3Com USR 5610 PCI Modem Problems

3Com USR 5610 PCI Modem Problems

Post by web » Thu, 15 Jun 2000 04:00:00



I am an absolute newbie to Linux.  Running Mandrake 6.0 (the one that came
with Maximum Linux last fall) in a dual-boot situation on a P233MMX.  I've
got just about everything working.  A background in IRIX has seemed to help
me some.  Linux runs so much faster on this old horse.  However, my modem is
giving me problems.

I originally had a winmodem and ditched it after reading the listings at
www.o2.net
On that site they had listed the 3Com 3CP5610 as being "OK" for Linux.
Another entry on the Mandrake FAQ confirmed that, indeed, at least somebody
was able to make this work.  No me though....

I think the problem may stem from the fact that in Win95, the modem shows up
at Com5.  A check at 3Com confirmed this to be true and that it is not
changeable.  (This modem is jumperless)  They say that it will show up at
Com4 in other OS's but they don't include Linux in that list of "others."

I'm trying to use kppp and of course can only select com1-4 for my modem.
Has anyone else run into this before?  Is the answer right in front of my
eyes?  Any help would be appreciated.

Most humbly
web

 
 
 

3Com USR 5610 PCI Modem Problems

Post by Rob Cla » Thu, 15 Jun 2000 04:00:00




>I think the problem may stem from the fact that in Win95, the modem shows up
>at Com5.  A check at 3Com confirmed this to be true and that it is not
>changeable.  (This modem is jumperless)  They say that it will show up at
>Com4 in other OS's but they don't include Linux in that list of "others."

Please see the second note in http://www.o2.net/~gromitkc/3cp5610.txt

Using setserial, you can set the modem to be on any "COM port" that you
want, as long as the _physical_ COM port is disabled.  For example, if my
motherboard has a built-in COM2, I disable that in the BIOS.  Then I use

  setserial /dev/ttyS1 irq 10 ....

as in the example.



 
 
 

3Com USR 5610 PCI Modem Problems

Post by Webe » Fri, 16 Jun 2000 04:00:00




> >I think the problem may stem from the fact that in Win95, the modem shows up
> >at Com5.  A check at 3Com confirmed this to be true and that it is not
> >changeable.  (This modem is jumperless)  They say that it will show up at
> >Com4 in other OS's but they don't include Linux in that list of "others."

> Please see the second note in http://www.o2.net/~gromitkc/3cp5610.txt

> Using setserial, you can set the modem to be on any "COM port" that you
> want, as long as the _physical_ COM port is disabled.  For example, if my
> motherboard has a built-in COM2, I disable that in the BIOS.  Then I use

>   setserial /dev/ttyS1 irq 10 ....

> as in the example.



  Rob,

Thanks very much for the help...I can get some sleep now.

BTW I am writing this in linux...

web

 
 
 

3Com USR 5610 PCI Modem Problems

Post by Andrey Vlaso » Fri, 16 Jun 2000 04:00:00


Hi there,

I will tell my modem story. Windows 98 reported it as COM4 and I spent about
2 hours before I found trhat in Linux it was /dev/ttyS2 (COM3). My conclusion
was that Linux assign next available /devttyS?? and documentation or
Windows98 mislead people. Try do not disable port in BIOS and check
through setserial which /dev/ttyS?? (port) will be taken  by your modem.

in bash

for tty in 3 4 5 6
do
      setserial "your parameters here" /dev/ttyS$tty
      setserial -g /dev/ttyS$tty
done

something like that (can not check as on Solaris system at the moment)

Andrey


> I am an absolute newbie to Linux.  Running Mandrake 6.0 (the one that came
> with Maximum Linux last fall) in a dual-boot situation on a P233MMX.  I've
> got just about everything working.  A background in IRIX has seemed to help
> me some.  Linux runs so much faster on this old horse.  However, my modem is
> giving me problems.

> I originally had a winmodem and ditched it after reading the listings at
> www.o2.net
> On that site they had listed the 3Com 3CP5610 as being "OK" for Linux.
> Another entry on the Mandrake FAQ confirmed that, indeed, at least somebody
> was able to make this work.  No me though....

> I think the problem may stem from the fact that in Win95, the modem shows up
> at Com5.  A check at 3Com confirmed this to be true and that it is not
> changeable.  (This modem is jumperless)  They say that it will show up at
> Com4 in other OS's but they don't include Linux in that list of "others."

> I'm trying to use kppp and of course can only select com1-4 for my modem.
> Has anyone else run into this before?  Is the answer right in front of my
> eyes?  Any help would be appreciated.

> Most humbly
> web

 
 
 

3Com USR 5610 PCI Modem Problems

Post by Christopher Brow » Sat, 17 Jun 2000 04:00:00


Centuries ago, Nostradamus foresaw a time when web would say:

Quote:>I am an absolute newbie to Linux.  Running Mandrake 6.0 (the one that came
>with Maximum Linux last fall) in a dual-boot situation on a P233MMX.  I've
>got just about everything working.  A background in IRIX has seemed to help
>me some.  Linux runs so much faster on this old horse.  However, my modem is
>giving me problems.

>I originally had a winmodem and ditched it after reading the listings at
>www.o2.net
>On that site they had listed the 3Com 3CP5610 as being "OK" for Linux.
>Another entry on the Mandrake FAQ confirmed that, indeed, at least somebody
>was able to make this work.  No me though....

>I think the problem may stem from the fact that in Win95, the modem shows up
>at Com5.  A check at 3Com confirmed this to be true and that it is not
>changeable.  (This modem is jumperless)  They say that it will show up at
>Com4 in other OS's but they don't include Linux in that list of "others."

>I'm trying to use kppp and of course can only select com1-4 for my modem.
>Has anyone else run into this before?  Is the answer right in front of my
>eyes?  Any help would be appreciated.

Something's probably messed up there; there aren't enough interrupts
and IRQs out there for there to be more than 4 actual ports on the
average PC.

You might look at: <http://www.kcdata.com/~gromitkc/pedersen.txt>

The comments by Ron Zdrojkowski look to be particularly of use:
- they allow you to look at something (/proc/pci) that is informative,
- they provide some information on why the card is a tad problematic
  to fiddle with
- it provides some instructions involving simple commands, rather than
  trying to "can it" inside an automated system that may have a hard
  time coping with the Real World.

Excerpted thus:

  These hints were written for the 3Com 3CP5610, but should also apply
  to any 3Com modem with "Vendor id=12b9. Device id=1008."

*/



Subject: 3com5610

Hello,

I thought you might wanted to know, I got a 3com/usr 3cp5610 to work, by
adding the following to the startup scripts...

exec setserial /dev/ttyS4 irq 9 port 0xb000 ^fourport ^auto_irq skip_test
autoconfig spd_vhi

The ^fourport is the key since setserial otherwise will believe the card
has four ports instead of just the one shown in /proc/pci (I spend a night
figuring this out, so I will pass this on to somebody else, so they can
save the hassle). skip_test is important too for setserial to believe
there is an 16550A instead of the 16550AF there really is.

On the same irq 9 I have several PCI devices: pcmcia scsi, USB, sound and
modem, which all seems to work.

------



Subject: re: 3Com 3CP5610 modem

Regarding the 3Com 3CP5610 modem and Linux

This is what worked for me on a Gateway GP6.  I don't have much
experience with Linux or x86 PCs so I don't know if this will work for
you.

After installing the modem card and starting up the system, Windows
took over and "installed" the card. I assume it stores some parameters
in the NVRAM used by the BIOS. I tried a lot of things to force
interrupt values and ioport values through Windows and ended up wiping
out my Windows setup to the point where I had some difficulty getting
it to boot up in any system. Once I got over that problem, I found a
way to avoid Windows completely after the initial sort of "plug and
play" setup.

The process turns out to be pretty simple.

Boot up in Linux after the card has been installed and the  Windows
initialization has occured.

In a terminal window, type

cat /proc/pci

Scroll down until you find the data for the serial controller. Mine
looked like:

<snip>
Bus  0, device  15, function  0:
    Serial controller: Unknown vendor Unknown device (rev 1).
      Vendor id=12b9. Device id=1008.
      Medium devsel.  IRQ 10.  
      I/O at 0x1890 [0x1891].

<snip>

Make a note of the values for IRQ and I/O port. In my case they were
10 and 0x1890 respectively.

Then in the terminal window type

setserial /dev/ttyS1 irq 10 port 0x1890 autoconfig

where you use the correct values of irq and port for your system as
obtained from the "cat /proc/pci" output. Then, you need to create the
symbolic link between /dev/modem and /dev/ttyS1 with the ln command.
Once that is done, you should be able to access the modem using
minicom. If that works, and all of your PPP stuff is set up OK you
should be able to log onto the internet. I don't think it really
matters which COM port Windows uses for the modem.

At this point you will need to use the setserial command each time you
reboot your machine. To make it automatic, enter the setserial command
at the end or your rc.local file so that it is executed automatically
each time you reboot.

The only problem I had after doing this occured after I installed a
new SCSI controller card into the GP6. Windows installed the card but
later, when I went to use the modem in Linux, it didn't work. What
happened was, Windows changed the irq and port settings for the modem
card. The original values for the modem had now been assigned to the
SCSI card and the modem had two new values. Changing those values in
the setserial command to the new ones  found with "cat /proc/pci" put
everything right again. It's been working for several months with no
problems.

Several others have used this procedure successfully. I don't know if
anyone who has tried it has failed. Good luck.

------



Subject: 3com 5610/2977

I just thought I should share my slightly different experience from
Mr. Pedersen's.
I had a privilege recently of installing a 3com 3cp2977 PCI modem
under Mandrake 6.0. The machine is a Celeron 366 on PcChips
m761 (Intel BX) motherboard with C-media 8338 onboard sound.

For quite some time I had to stare at the "sorry, the modem is
busy" message, since the modem and sound used the same IRQ 10.
The modem worked great when the sound module was removed from the
memory, but that is not exactly the solution.
I had seen a report on the Internet about the same modem sharing
interrupts with other devices, but now I assume it was under
2.3.x kernel.
I didn't figure out how to change the interrupt, so I downloaded
the serial-4.92 driver from http://serial.sourceforge.net and
compiled it into 2.2.15pre14. (The only catch was to manually copy
the serial_compat.h to drivers/char). Anyway, the modem isn't sorry
anymore.
The nice part in the new serial driver is that it sets up /dev/ttyS2
during bootup, my job was just to find it was ttyS2.

Hope this can be of use for somebody.
--

"I  worry that  the person  who thought  up Muzak  may be  thinking up
something else." -- Lily Tomlin

 
 
 

1. Solved: configuration of 3Com/USR 5610 PCI modem

Hello,

I've been reading in this forum for information
about getting my PCI modem to work under linux.  I
just wanted to say thanks for  all of the great
suggestions, particularly, messages from Klavs T.
Pedersen and Matt G. "Dances with Crows".  I'm
including the solution, in case others are also
having problems.

Jeff

1.  Find the IRQ and base address for the modem:
cat /proc/pci

2. Find the entry for your modem, e.g.:
Bus  1, device   8, function  0:
Serial controller: Unknown vendor Unknown device(rev 1).
Vendor id=12b9. Device id=1008.
Medium devsel.  IRQ 10.
I/O at 0xecb8 [0xecb9].

3. Note the IRQ (in this case, 10) and base address (0xecb8)

4.  If you don't already have a /dev/ttyS4, make one with:
mknod -m 666 /dev/ttyS4 c 4 68

5. Now, configure the port with setserial (as root):
setserial /dev/ttyS4 irq 10 port 0xecb8 ^fourport ^auto_irq skip_test
autoconfig spd_vhi

6. Make a symbolic link to /dev/modem:
rm /dev/modem (if it exists already)
ln -s /dev/ttyS4 /dev/modem

7. To test this, start minicom.  If in the main screen, you can type
"AT" and have the modem respond "OK", then it is
working.

8. Finally, add the command from step 5 to the end of
/etc/rc.d/rc.local, like so:

#/etc/rc.d/rc.local:
...
exec setserial /dev/ttyS4 irq 10 port 0xecb8 ...

9.  Save and restart, and you are ready to go!

Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
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