Penguin Computing server

Penguin Computing server

Post by brya » Sun, 25 Apr 1999 04:00:00



: Hi, We are in the process of buying new web servers. Currently I'm
: considering Penguin Computing machines - has anyone used them? Any opinions
: about them? Also I will appreciate any suggestions about the best
: configuration for a fault tolerant web server. Do I need a separate IDE disk
: for the system?

: My current choice is:
: Supermicro MB with one PIII 450MHz

its a shame so few places build with asus.  penguin builds with
supermicro (* ami bios and OLD, too).  VA builds with tyan (same
crappy ami bios but a better board and supermicro).

neither place entertains the idea of using the [more stable and
configurable] asus board.  I wish I knew why.

: RAID one controller with 2 9.1GB drives(hot swappable)

I'd get 3 drives; 2 in raid1 and one as a hot standby.

--
Bryan

 
 
 

Penguin Computing server

Post by pe.. » Sun, 25 Apr 1999 04:00:00



Quote:> Hi, We are in the process of buying new web servers. Currently I'm
> considering Penguin Computing machines - has anyone used them?

Penguin machines are no different that your garden variety PC.  They
do use somewhat higher quality components than your average PC dealer,
though.

Quote:>   Also I will appreciate any suggestions about the best
> configuration for a fault tolerant web server. Do I need a separate IDE disk
> for the system?

For a server, you don't want *anything* IDE, and you want the fastest
SCSI system you can afford.

Quote:> My current choice is:
> Supermicro MB with one PIII 450MHz
> 512 MB RAM
> RAID one controller with 2 9.1GB drives(hot swappable)
> dual power supplies
> Intel 10/100 Ethernet Adapter
> ATI 2MB AGP Graphics Card
> EIDE CD-ROM

Dual power supplies and RAID-1 hardly make for a fault-tolerant
server.  In fact, you can't really build a fault-tolerant system out
of PC components unless you put several complete machines in parallel.

I'd *strongly* recomend that you go with a RAID-5 disk system, and
that you make certain that the cache RAM in the CPU *and* your system
RAM is true ECC party that can correct single-bit errors and detect
multi-bit errors.  Be warned that although this makes for a very
robust system (much more robust than your average PC) it is still by
no means fault tolerant.

-p.

 
 
 

Penguin Computing server

Post by Rod Roar » Mon, 26 Apr 1999 04:00:00



>Hi, We are in the process of buying new web servers. Currently I'm
>considering Penguin Computing machines - has anyone used them? Any opinions
>about them? Also I will appreciate any suggestions about the best
>configuration for a fault tolerant web server. Do I need a separate IDE disk
>for the system?

>My current choice is:
>Supermicro MB with one PIII 450MHz
>512 MB RAM
>RAID one controller with 2 9.1GB drives(hot swappable)
>dual power supplies
>Intel 10/100 Ethernet Adapter
>ATI 2MB AGP Graphics Card
>EIDE CD-ROM

What are you doing for backup?  Mirroring protects only against disk
failure.  In the real world there are plenty of other ways to hose a
system that are *much* more likely.

Spend your money on high quality drives (which probably means SCSI)
including one or two for fast backups with minimal downtime, ECC memory
and a good UPS.  If there's enough left over for mirroring, fine.

-- Rod
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Sunset Systems                           Preconfigured Linux Computers
http://www.sunsetsystems.com/                      and Custom Software
----------------------------------------------------------------------

 
 
 

Penguin Computing server

Post by The Penguin Know » Mon, 17 May 1999 04:00:00


Use a load balancer for fault tolerance.  :^)
 
 
 

Penguin Computing server

Post by L.. » Mon, 24 May 1999 04:00:00


Hmmm... Nice set up!  Try our's: http://www.coyotepoint.com it's called
Equalizer.

                Cheers,
                -LkM

In article


Quote:> Use a load balancer for fault tolerance.  :^)

--
------------------------------------------------------
Lance Morgan              | Customer Service Engineer
Coyote Point Systems, Inc | http://www.coyotepoint.com
------------------------------------------------------

--== Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/ ==--
---Share what you know. Learn what you don't.---

 
 
 

1. New mobo in old ATX Penguin Computing box?

I've got an old Penguin Computing system (dual PIII 800MHz) system whose
power supply is slowly dying a painful death.  I might just swap out the
PS but was then wondering if I might as well take this opportunity to
make a "new" box out of it.

My question is whether a new mobo will fit into this system's old ATX
chassis.  Here is the box:

   http://www.calpc.com/catalog/2u-atx.html

The system is a few hundred miles away from me so I can't take it into
the local Fry's but I would appreciate any advice.

Thanks!

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