Partitioning for new computer?

Partitioning for new computer?

Post by Michae » Wed, 23 Jun 1999 04:00:00



I am having a new computer built on which I would like to try out Linux as
well as Win 98.
Untill I can get a second hard drive can I partition my present hard drive
to run both?
If so could I then remove all traces of Linux and move it to the new hard
drive when I get it?
If someone could direct me to the proper How-To's it would be a great help.
The hard drive I have is a Maxtor Diamond max plus 5120 10.2Gb.
Thanks in advance.
            Michael
 
 
 

Partitioning for new computer?

Post by wizar » Wed, 23 Jun 1999 04:00:00



> I am having a new computer built on which I would like to try out Linux as
> well as Win 98.
> Untill I can get a second hard drive can I partition my present hard drive
> to run both?
> If so could I then remove all traces of Linux and move it to the new hard
> drive when I get it?
> If someone could direct me to the proper How-To's it would be a great help.
> The hard drive I have is a Maxtor Diamond max plus 5120 10.2Gb.
> Thanks in advance.
>             Michael

The answers more or less are yes to all of the above.    Search around online
an you will find info about installing Linux.    At the very minimum you will
need two partitions for linux.    There are limits to where the parttion with
the boot files can go ( at least with older versions of LiLo).

Actually having two drives can give you a performance boost in both Windows
and linux environments.    Putting the swap partitions on another drive
sitting on a SEPERATE IDE controller will boost performance.

Dave

 
 
 

Partitioning for new computer?

Post by Timothy Murp » Thu, 24 Jun 1999 04:00:00



>I am having a new computer built on which I would like to try out Linux as
>well as Win 98.
>Untill I can get a second hard drive can I partition my present hard drive
>to run both?

No problem.
In fact there is no advantage in having 2 drives.

Quote:>If so could I then remove all traces of Linux and move it to the new hard
>drive when I get it?

Easily.

Quote:>If someone could direct me to the proper How-To's it would be a great help.
>The hard drive I have is a Maxtor Diamond max plus 5120 10.2Gb.

I would get RedHat-6.0 (eg from www.cheapbytes.com for $2)
and read the rhmanual on the subject.
Basically, when you install RedHat Linux you are asked
if you want to partition the disk,
and can use DiskDruid or fdisk for this.
(I would use fdisk.)

I have a 9GB disk with 10 partitions (I think): vis
NT (1GB), DOS (64MB), /boot (32 MB), / (1GB), /usr/share (1GB),
/usr/local (1GB), /usr/src (1GB), /opt (1GB), /usr/tmp (1GB), swap (250MB).
All except the first 2 are Linux partitions.
The last 8 are logical partitions in an extended partition.

I think it is a good idea to have a lot of partitions
though some people disagree.
It is better to have /boot (or / if there isn't a /boot partition)
near the beginning of the disk.

As to getting rid of Linux from a disk,
if you format a partition you get rid of the info on it.

--
Timothy Murphy  

tel: +353-1-2842366
s-mail: School of Mathematics, Trinity College, Dublin 2, Ireland

 
 
 

Partitioning for new computer?

Post by Walter L. William » Fri, 25 Jun 1999 04:00:00



> I would get RedHat-6.0 (eg from www.cheapbytes.com for $2)
> and read the rhmanual on the subject.
> Basically, when you install RedHat Linux you are asked
> if you want to partition the disk,
> and can use DiskDruid or fdisk for this.
> (I would use fdisk.)

 Michael

Red Hat is a good distro. They are all a little different. Find one that
suits you. I started with Caldera OL 1.0, then I went to Red Hat 4.2 then
5.0. I now use SuSE 6.0 and find that fills my needs. Internet connectivity
was easy to setup and When I learn more about networking I hope
that will be easy to setup as well, with YaST.

Be open minded like the software.

Walt in Utah

 
 
 

1. Separate /boot partition needed for new computers ?

Hi all.

Condensed :

I just bought a new computer. Do I still need a small partition at the
beginning of a drive to place the /boot directory so that the Linux kernel
will be in the first 1024 cylinders of a drive like I had to do with my 486 ?

The Story :

When I had my 486, I had to make a small ( ~4MB ) partition at the beginning
of my hard drive and put the /boot directory in order to ensure that the
kernel was within the 1024 cylinder limit so that Linux will boot properly. I
then had a 1 gig partition for Windows, another gig for Linux, and several
megabytes for a Linux swap partition.

I recently bought myself a new computer and would lke to install NT and Linux
on it. I partitioned the drive in exactly the same manner, with the 4MB
partition as the first. I then installed Windows 95 on the second and Linux on
the third and four partitions respectively.

When I tried to install NT on top of Windows 95, I found that NT refused to
install onto what was drive C: but was not the first partition on the drive.
I understand that if C: was the first partition, NT would be happy. Can I
repartition the drive so that C: is the first partition, and have Linux lie at
the back of the disk ? Will there be any problems in booting Linux then ?

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