Iwill DVD266-R Linux compatibility

Iwill DVD266-R Linux compatibility

Post by Ian Pilche » Mon, 16 Jul 2001 06:02:13



Even since I upgraded my Tyan Trinity 400-based system to Red Hat 7.1,
I've had occassional IDE DMA problems (once every few weeks) -- despite
the fact that the Apollo Pro 133A chipset on this board is not supposed
to be affected by these problems.  I've seen the same problem with both
Red Hat's 2.4.2 kernel and 2.4.5ac10.

Thus far, mirroring has prevented me from losing any data, but I'm
getting pretty sick of this.  (If I wanted an unstable system, I'd run
Windows.)  So off I went to Fry's to checkout out my motherboard
options.  I decided that if I'm going to invest the time to swap boards,
I should look for something that I can live with for a while -- namely a
board with dual-processor and DDR memory support.  I was also hoping to
get away from VIA chipsets.

The only board that met my requirements was the Iwill DVD266-R.  (In
fact Iwill's web site claims that it's the only board that has these
features.)  But there's the dreaded VIA chipset again.  So what's a
poor technophile to do?

  * Is Iwill's claim correct that no other board supports dual Pentium
    III processors and DDR memory correct?

  * If Iwill's claim is incorrect or dated, is there another *chipset*
    that will do what I want?

  * Anyone have any experience with any of the specific components on
    this board -- Apollo Pro266 chipset (VT8633 and VT8233), AMI 80649
    IDE RAID controller, C-Media CMI8738 sound chip?

  * lm_sensors support?

Specs are available at:

http://www.iwillusa.com/products/spec.asp?ModelName=DVD266-R&SupportID=

Thanks!

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Iwill DVD266-R Linux compatibility

Post by Richard Robert » Mon, 16 Jul 2001 10:06:11


I have quite a bit of experience with homebrewed-component-systems and thus with different brands, etc.  First off, I would not mix Intel and DDR.  While it does "work", DDR is AMD's technology and Intel and AMD are competitors and do not like sharing stuff, so you will get a much more stable and probably faster system if you get Pentium+RDRAM or Athlon+DDR (I'm assuming you don't want SDRAM).  Personally I'd go with the Athlon and DDR, simply because I'm not crazy about Intel and Athlon's cheaper anyway (and the infamous "compatibility issues"...I've never seen any).  Of couse you could go with the Intel too if you want.

Now for the answer to your question #1...I wouldn't be surprised.  For the reason I gave above, you'll have trouble finding a (decent) board that has both.

That voids question #2

Question #3:  Yes and for the most part they suck (in my opinion of course).  The reason I say this is because I read about all sorts of real compatibility issues and bugs with VIA/Apollo chipsets.  Even in the Linux kernel configuration there are warnings about enabling certain options with VIA/Apollo chipsets.  As for those on-board components, I've never heard of any of the brands (which is bad), and I stay away from on-board stuff anyway.  Most decent boards have 5 or so PCI slots, and then you can upgrade or replace broken stuff or whatever.

All in all, and considering I haven't heard of Iwill either, I'd stay away from their boards.  Motherboard quality really does make a huge difference in speed and stability (not to mention configurablity (if that's a word))

NOW HERE'S MY POSITIVE ADVICE!!!  :-)

Whatever you do get an Asus board.  Not only are they stable and fast but in terms of usability they are very nice.  While others such as Abit and friends usually recieve good ratings, in my observations they are hit-or-miss.  If you get an Intel processor get an Intel chipset, and if you get an AMD processor get an AMD chipset.  While others work with the current state of processor development the same-brand chipsets will be the most "compatible", ie the fastest and most stable.

Anyway I hope this helps since it took me so long to type :-) and now I'm going for dinner...

good luck,
Richard

On Sat, 14 Jul 2001 21:02:13 GMT


> Even since I upgraded my Tyan Trinity 400-based system to Red Hat 7.1,
> I've had occassional IDE DMA problems (once every few weeks) -- despite
> the fact that the Apollo Pro 133A chipset on this board is not supposed
> to be affected by these problems.  I've seen the same problem with both
> Red Hat's 2.4.2 kernel and 2.4.5ac10.

> Thus far, mirroring has prevented me from losing any data, but I'm
> getting pretty sick of this.  (If I wanted an unstable system, I'd run
> Windows.)  So off I went to Fry's to checkout out my motherboard
> options.  I decided that if I'm going to invest the time to swap boards,
> I should look for something that I can live with for a while -- namely a
> board with dual-processor and DDR memory support.  I was also hoping to
> get away from VIA chipsets.

> The only board that met my requirements was the Iwill DVD266-R.  (In
> fact Iwill's web site claims that it's the only board that has these
> features.)  But there's the dreaded VIA chipset again.  So what's a
> poor technophile to do?

>   * Is Iwill's claim correct that no other board supports dual Pentium
>     III processors and DDR memory correct?

>   * If Iwill's claim is incorrect or dated, is there another *chipset*
>     that will do what I want?

>   * Anyone have any experience with any of the specific components on
>     this board -- Apollo Pro266 chipset (VT8633 and VT8233), AMI 80649
>     IDE RAID controller, C-Media CMI8738 sound chip?

>   * lm_sensors support?

> Specs are available at:

> http://www.iwillusa.com/products/spec.asp?ModelName=DVD266-R&SupportID=

> Thanks!

> --
> ========================================================================

> ========================================================================


 
 
 

Iwill DVD266-R Linux compatibility

Post by Robert M Taylor, Jr » Tue, 17 Jul 2001 11:35:16


Iwill makes fine motherboards. The chip-set issue is a different matter. I
believe that the issue of stability of the chip-set is due most often a
matter of the vendors willingness to support the chip-set. VIA boards are
probably not up to the performance of the AMD/Intel chip-set boards, but
there are plenty of well designed and built VIA boards out there by Iwill,
Asus, Abit and AOpen/Acer. They are not unstable, they are slower.
I also would not buy a DDR/Intel solution right now. AMD solutions are
cheaper and faster than anything less than a P4. T'bird chips are much
cheaper and faster.
If I ever replace this aging BX mainboard, the chip-set will likely not be
either AMD or Intel. AMD does not really want the cost of that part of
development. They would rather license this out to other companies. Intel
kit costs far too much considering the performance vs. price ratio. I would
rather wait for better DDR performance from either VIA or SIS (736 needs
Linux support soon if not already there).


> I have quite a bit of experience with homebrewed-component-systems and
> thus with different brands, etc.  First off, I would not mix Intel and
> DDR.  While it does "work", DDR is AMD's technology and Intel and AMD are
> competitors and do not like sharing stuff, so you will get a much more
> stable and probably faster system if you get Pentium+RDRAM or Athlon+DDR
> (I'm assuming you don't want SDRAM).  Personally I'd go with the Athlon
> and DDR, simply because I'm not crazy about Intel and Athlon's cheaper
> anyway (and the infamous "compatibility issues"...I've never seen any).
> Of couse you could go with the Intel too if you want.

> Now for the answer to your question #1...I wouldn't be surprised.  For the
> reason I gave above, you'll have trouble finding a (decent) board that has
> both.

> That voids question #2

> Question #3:  Yes and for the most part they suck (in my opinion of
> course).  The reason I say this is because I read about all sorts of real
> compatibility issues and bugs with VIA/Apollo chipsets.  Even in the Linux
> kernel configuration there are warnings about enabling certain options
> with VIA/Apollo chipsets.  As for those on-board components, I've never
> heard of any of the brands (which is bad), and I stay away from on-board
> stuff anyway.  Most decent boards have 5 or so PCI slots, and then you can
> upgrade or replace broken stuff or whatever.

> All in all, and considering I haven't heard of Iwill either, I'd stay away
> from their boards.  Motherboard quality really does make a huge difference
> in speed and stability (not to mention configurablity (if that's a word))

> NOW HERE'S MY POSITIVE ADVICE!!!  :-)

> Whatever you do get an Asus board.  Not only are they stable and fast but
> in terms of usability they are very nice.  While others such as Abit and
> friends usually recieve good ratings, in my observations they are
> hit-or-miss.  If you get an Intel processor get an Intel chipset, and if
> you get an AMD processor get an AMD chipset.  While others work with the
> current state of processor development the same-brand chipsets will be the
> most "compatible", ie the fastest and most stable.

> Anyway I hope this helps since it took me so long to type :-) and now I'm
> going for dinner...

> good luck,
> Richard

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