Install Advice

Install Advice

Post by David Fument » Wed, 09 Apr 2003 11:16:18



1.  Use recent, standard, standard, standard hardware.
2.  If windows, XP or Win2K, not the others
3.  Never do an upgrade.  Reformat and do a fresh install.
4.  Run patch update programs (e.g. Windows update, up2date).
5.  Don't forget to read the README file!
 
 
 

Install Advice

Post by Sven Vermeule » Wed, 09 Apr 2003 20:06:00



>  3.  Never do an upgrade.  Reformat and do a fresh install.

This is, sorry to say, bullshit. Several Linux/Unix versions can be easily
upgraded, without troubles. There are "only if" statements, however. One of
them is "only if you haven't installed non-distribution software", because
the distribution can only update the software it delivers...

Upgrading takes far less time than reinstalling, which is *very* important
for production systems, especially if the server doesn't have a
mirrorsolution (failover or other situations).

Wkr,
        Sven Vermeulen

 
 
 

Install Advice

Post by David Fument » Thu, 10 Apr 2003 03:43:50


Respectfully disagree.  Too many variables when upgrading.  Even when it may
seem to be ok, how do you really know?  You don't.  With a fresh install you
know the vendor has tested that setup.  Does anyone really want to take a
chance and have, say, a database messed up and only to find it out after how
long?




> >  3.  Never do an upgrade.  Reformat and do a fresh install.

> This is, sorry to say, bullshit. Several Linux/Unix versions can be easily
> upgraded, without troubles. There are "only if" statements, however. One
of
> them is "only if you haven't installed non-distribution software", because
> the distribution can only update the software it delivers...

> Upgrading takes far less time than reinstalling, which is *very* important
> for production systems, especially if the server doesn't have a
> mirrorsolution (failover or other situations).

> Wkr,
> Sven Vermeulen

 
 
 

Install Advice

Post by Sven Vermeule » Thu, 10 Apr 2003 03:59:58



>  Respectfully disagree.  Too many variables when upgrading.  Even when it may
>  seem to be ok, how do you really know?  You don't.  With a fresh install you
>  know the vendor has tested that setup.  Does anyone really want to take a
>  chance and have, say, a database messed up and only to find it out after how
>  long?

The vendor also tests upgrades. And the vendor doesn't test all possible
configurations. And the chances that a database gets messed up are very
small: the database itself doesn't change during an update, unless you also
upgrade the database-format (f.i. MyISAM->InnoDB), which will not be
happening during a normal distro-upgrade.

A good upgrade will create a system in exactly the same state as if you'd
use a fresh-install, and this much quicker than using a fresh install. Yes,
there are catches, but they are well-known.

And you'll surely test an upgrade on a develbox before proceeding to a
productionsystem ;)

Oh well, it'll probably be another "purely individual taste"... right next to
"best distribution", "best mailerdaemon", "best ftp-daemon", ...

Wkr,
        Sven Vermeulen

 
 
 

Install Advice

Post by David L. Johnso » Thu, 10 Apr 2003 06:00:45



> Respectfully disagree.  Too many variables when upgrading.  Even when it may
> seem to be ok, how do you really know?  You don't.  With a fresh install you
> know the vendor has tested that setup.  Does anyone really want to take a
> chance and have, say, a database messed up and only to find it out after how
> long?

I have to disagree with this logic, and agree with the previous response
below.  Updating, or upgrading packages will, yes, occasionally break
something.  Usually it won't though.  If it does, most of the time it's
just a configuration file that needs to be tweaked.  Flushing ane        
re-installing removes all the configuration you have done.  You have to
re-do what you did before, and still run the risk that a configuration
syntax has changed, requiring all the work that upgrading would have done,
on top of the new-intallation headaches.

I recently installed debian on a new computer -- I had been using debian
for years, but even so there was an additional hassle involved in
configuring the new machine.  That would not have been there simply
updating as you go along.

Quote:>> Upgrading takes far less time than reinstalling, which is *very* important
>> for production systems, especially if the server doesn't have a
>> mirrorsolution (failover or other situations).

--

David L. Johnson

   __o   | Let's not escape into mathematics.  Let's stay with reality. --
 _`\(,_  | Michael Crichton  
(_)/ (_) |

 
 
 

1. Install Advice-Solaris for Intel

Each time I try to install from the original Sun media, I get an error
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I suspect the Solaris wants to have the drive preformatted and
pre-partitioned, but there doesn't seem to be any way to run the solaris
fdisk program.

Any one been here before? What step am I missing?

I'm trying to use a Pentium II 350, 128 Megs ram, 9 gig Ultra2SCSI
Drive, ASUS P2BLS.  Hardware detection goes smoothly - just when the
program is about to write to hard disk that it crashes.

-Jeff

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