Mail Server Newbie

Mail Server Newbie

Post by James Horvat » Thu, 15 Feb 2001 06:43:03



I am looking to set up a simple Linux mail server at home to collect email
from a number of POP3 accounts, store them on a "mail hub" machine, and
allow access to those messages from Microsoft Outlook 2000 (on a Windows
2000 Pro machine).

I have Mandrake Linux 7.2 (minimal install) on a Pentium Celeron 400MHz with
32MB RAM.

I have installed sendmail (but haven't gotten too far with configuring it
yet (do I even need this?  Would qmail be a better option for a rookie?)),
and fetchmail (which is able to successfully collect my mail from a variety
of accounts and store it on the linux box).  I setup local DNS on the linux
machine, and can ping the mailhub from the Windows machines.

My question is, what do I need to setup to read my mail from my Windows
machine using Outlook 2000?  I can read it from Linux using Kmail, etc., so
I know the transfer from the POP accounts worked fine.  As stated I can ping
the mailhub (using either the IP address or the name (mailsys.mydomain.com))
from the Windows machine, but Outlook states it can't connect with the
mailhub.  Do I need NIS?  NFS?  Samba?  Sendmail?  Procmail?  Something
else?

TIA,

James

 
 
 

Mail Server Newbie

Post by Jeremiah DeWitt Weine » Thu, 15 Feb 2001 07:21:59



> I am looking to set up a simple Linux mail server at home to collect email
> from a number of POP3 accounts, store them on a "mail hub" machine, and
> allow access to those messages from Microsoft Outlook 2000 (on a Windows
> 2000 Pro machine).

        OK, but you don't say just how you want the Windows clients to be
able to access the mail.  POP?  IMAP?  Something else?

Quote:> I have installed sendmail (but haven't gotten too far with configuring it
> yet (do I even need this?  Would qmail be a better option for a rookie?)),

        Urk.  I do this sort of stuff for a living, and I don't recommend
sendmail for _anybody_, unless you happen to need some of the more specialized
capabilities of sendmail - which I doubt you do.  qmail or Exim are much
easier to deal with.

Quote:> My question is, what do I need to setup to read my mail from my Windows
> machine using Outlook 2000?  I can read it from Linux using Kmail, etc., so
> I know the transfer from the POP accounts worked fine.  As stated I can ping
> the mailhub (using either the IP address or the name (mailsys.mydomain.com))
> from the Windows machine, but Outlook states it can't connect with the
> mailhub.  Do I need NIS?  NFS?  Samba?  Sendmail?  Procmail?  Something
> else?

        Sounds like you've made a really good start, actually.  What you need
now is a POP or IMAP daemon.  IMAP is probably better, given what you've
described so far.  (Why bother collecting the mail in a central place just
to spread it out across all the Windows boxen again?)  ipop3d and imapd are
two choices; I've no doubt there are others.

JDW

 
 
 

Mail Server Newbie

Post by Manish Jethan » Thu, 15 Feb 2001 08:25:30



>I am looking to set up a simple Linux mail server at home to collect email
>from a number of POP3 accounts, store them on a "mail hub" machine, and
>allow access to those messages from Microsoft Outlook 2000 (on a Windows
>[snip]
>mailhub.  Do I need NIS?  NFS?  Samba?  Sendmail?  Procmail?  Something
>else?

Try qpopper. Download from qualcomm.com and check the documentation. It's a
POP server (daemon) that will allow your Windows clients to access mail on the
Linux server.

Manish Jethani

--

Not only is UNIX dead, it's starting to smell really bad.
                -- Rob Pike

 
 
 

Mail Server Newbie

Post by Rod Smi » Thu, 15 Feb 2001 13:31:56





>> I have installed sendmail (but haven't gotten too far with configuring it
>> yet (do I even need this?  Would qmail be a better option for a rookie?)),

>    Urk.  I do this sort of stuff for a living, and I don't recommend
> sendmail for _anybody_, unless you happen to need some of the more specialized
> capabilities of sendmail - which I doubt you do.  qmail or Exim are much
> easier to deal with.

I'm not a big sendmail fan myself, but it does have one big advantage
for most Linux users: It comes with most Linux distributions. (A couple
of notable exceptions: Debian and its derivatives ship with Exim, and
Mandrake ships with Postfix.) This means that sendmail is up and running
with little or no effort on most systems. If the mail server
configuration needs serious changes, then it might be worth the hassle
of removing sendmail and installing and configuring qmail, Exim,
Postfix, or possibly something else. OTOH, if you've got all the tools
to modify the sendmail m4 scripts and recompile them, sendmail
configuration isn't too tricky, either. The trouble is that some
distributions omit this stuff from a basic installation, so you've got
to track it all down -- which isn't really all that difficult, but it's
a lot of stuff for a newbie to figure out.

--

http://www.rodsbooks.com
Author of books on Linux & multi-OS configuration

 
 
 

Mail Server Newbie

Post by Paul Kimo » Thu, 15 Feb 2001 14:57:57



> I'm not a big sendmail fan myself, but it does have one big advantage
> for most Linux users: It comes with most Linux distributions. (A couple
> of notable exceptions: Debian and its derivatives ship with Exim, and
> Mandrake ships with Postfix.)

Debian ships with _all_ the major MTAs.

$ cat /var/state/apt/lists/http.us.debian.org_debian_dists_stable_*Packages |
  egrep 'Package: (sendmail$|qmail|postfix$|exim$)'
Package: exim
Package: postfix
Package: sendmail
Package: qmail-src

--
Paul Kimoto
This message was originally posted on Usenet in plain text.  Any images,
hyperlinks, or the like shown here have been added without my consent,
and may be a violation of international copyright law.

 
 
 

Mail Server Newbie

Post by Michael Heimin » Thu, 15 Feb 2001 16:51:06



> I am looking to set up a simple Linux mail server at home to collect email
> from a number of POP3 accounts, store them on a "mail hub" machine, and
> allow access to those messages from Microsoft Outlook 2000 (on a Windows
> 2000 Pro machine).

> I have Mandrake Linux 7.2 (minimal install) on a Pentium Celeron 400MHz with
> 32MB RAM.

> I have installed sendmail (but haven't gotten too far with configuring it
> yet (do I even need this?  Would qmail be a better option for a rookie?)),
> and fetchmail (which is able to successfully collect my mail from a variety
> of accounts and store it on the linux box).  I setup local DNS on the linux
> machine, and can ping the mailhub from the Windows machines.

If sendmail is on your box and running, I asume you just want it to forward all

your outgoing mail to your ISP mail server, just edit /etc/sendmail.cf and put
this in:

# "Smart" relay host (may be null)
DS<your_ISP_mailserver>

Don't touch anything else in this file, unless you are absolutly sure what
you're doing.
Now reload sendmail with it's startup files:

/sbin/init.d/sendmail reload
or
/usr/sbin/rcsendmail reload

Send some mails and check
/var/log/mail

If you have problems post the output!

Quote:

> My question is, what do I need to setup to read my mail from my Windows
> machine using Outlook 2000?  I can read it from Linux using Kmail, etc., so
> I know the transfer from the POP accounts worked fine.  As stated I can ping
> the mailhub (using either the IP address or the name (mailsys.mydomain.com))
> from the Windows machine, but Outlook states it can't connect with the
> mailhub.  Do I need NIS?  NFS?  Samba?  Sendmail?  Procmail?  Something
> else?

> TIA,

> James

For POP3 you could go with qpopper from eudora as other suggested, it's easy to
setup
and comes with detailed instructions.

Only problem could be your usage of Outlook, which is prone to make trouble, I
would
use something different, pegasus or eudora MUA have both more features than
anyone
needs and work without any problems.

Good luck

Michael Heiming

 
 
 

Mail Server Newbie

Post by Jean-David Beye » Thu, 15 Feb 2001 21:28:03


Rod Smith wrote (in part):




> >> I have installed sendmail (but haven't gotten too far with configuring it
> >> yet (do I even need this?  Would qmail be a better option for a rookie?)),

> >       Urk.  I do this sort of stuff for a living, and I don't recommend
> > sendmail for _anybody_, unless you happen to need some of the more specialized
> > capabilities of sendmail - which I doubt you do.  qmail or Exim are much
> > easier to deal with.

> I'm not a big sendmail fan myself, but it does have one big advantage
> for most Linux users: It comes with most Linux distributions.

[snip]

Quote:> This means that sendmail is up and running
> with little or no effort on most systems.

Since I use Red Hat (6.2.3 at the moment), this is almost true. While
sendmail is up and running, it does not work the way I want because the
sendmail.cf is not suitable for me. Also, the version is only 8.9.3-20,
which is out of date.

So, I download the latest source from http://www.sendmail.org/ and build
it myself.

But a second big advantage is that there is Usenet group:
comp.mail.sendmail where a group of extremely knowledgeable people
rapidly answer questions. There are also a few people in this newsgroup
that can do the same, but the other is the appropriate one. (Of course,
there is probably a newsgroup for qmail and Exim as well, but I never
looked.)

--
 .~.  Jean-David Beyer           Registered Linux User 85642.
 /V\                             Registered Machine    73926.
/( )\ Shrewsbury, New Jersey
^^-^^ 7:20am up 16 days, 15:47, 4 users, load average: 2.05, 2.08, 2.06

 
 
 

Mail Server Newbie

Post by Jean-David Beye » Thu, 15 Feb 2001 21:32:16




> > I am looking to set up a simple Linux mail server at home to collect email
> > from a number of POP3 accounts, store them on a "mail hub" machine, and
> > allow access to those messages from Microsoft Outlook 2000 (on a Windows
> > 2000 Pro machine).

> > I have Mandrake Linux 7.2 (minimal install) on a Pentium Celeron 400MHz with
> > 32MB RAM.

> > I have installed sendmail (but haven't gotten too far with configuring it
> > yet (do I even need this?  Would qmail be a better option for a rookie?)),
> > and fetchmail (which is able to successfully collect my mail from a variety
> > of accounts and store it on the linux box).  I setup local DNS on the linux
> > machine, and can ping the mailhub from the Windows machines.

> If sendmail is on your box and running, I asume you just want it to forward all

> your outgoing mail to your ISP mail server, just edit /etc/sendmail.cf and put
> this in:

The experts on comp.mail.sendmail really disfavor diddling
/etc/sendmail.cf (which is no longer there, but in /etc/mail/sendmail.cf
anyway in the newer versions of sendmail), but recommend editing the
simpler sendmail.mc file instead. The comparable line would be:

dnl Use your.isp.neme as "smart" relay host. (19.6.47)
define(`SMART_HOST', `your.isp.name')

and then re-run m4 to generate the new sendmail.cf file.

- Show quoted text -

Quote:> # "Smart" relay host (may be null)
> DS<your_ISP_mailserver>

> Don't touch anything else in this file, unless you are absolutly sure what
> you're doing.
> Now reload sendmail with it's startup files:

> /sbin/init.d/sendmail reload
> or
> /usr/sbin/rcsendmail reload

> Send some mails and check
> /var/log/mail

> If you have problems post the output!

> > My question is, what do I need to setup to read my mail from my Windows
> > machine using Outlook 2000?  I can read it from Linux using Kmail, etc., so
> > I know the transfer from the POP accounts worked fine.  As stated I can ping
> > the mailhub (using either the IP address or the name (mailsys.mydomain.com))
> > from the Windows machine, but Outlook states it can't connect with the
> > mailhub.  Do I need NIS?  NFS?  Samba?  Sendmail?  Procmail?  Something
> > else?

> > TIA,

> > James

> For POP3 you could go with qpopper from eudora as other suggested, it's easy to
> setup
> and comes with detailed instructions.

> Only problem could be your usage of Outlook, which is prone to make trouble, I
> would
> use something different, pegasus or eudora MUA have both more features than
> anyone
> needs and work without any problems.

> Good luck

> Michael Heiming

--
 .~.  Jean-David Beyer           Registered Linux User 85642.
 /V\                             Registered Machine    73926.
/( )\ Shrewsbury, New Jersey
^^-^^ 7:25am up 16 days, 15:52, 4 users, load average: 2.08, 2.08, 2.07
 
 
 

Mail Server Newbie

Post by Michael Heimin » Thu, 15 Feb 2001 22:35:02





> > > I am looking to set up a simple Linux mail server at home to collect email
> > > from a number of POP3 accounts, store them on a "mail hub" machine, and
> > > allow access to those messages from Microsoft Outlook 2000 (on a Windows
> > > 2000 Pro machine).

> > > I have Mandrake Linux 7.2 (minimal install) on a Pentium Celeron 400MHz with
> > > 32MB RAM.

> > > I have installed sendmail (but haven't gotten too far with configuring it
> > > yet (do I even need this?  Would qmail be a better option for a rookie?)),
> > > and fetchmail (which is able to successfully collect my mail from a variety
> > > of accounts and store it on the linux box).  I setup local DNS on the linux
> > > machine, and can ping the mailhub from the Windows machines.

> > If sendmail is on your box and running, I asume you just want it to forward all

> > your outgoing mail to your ISP mail server, just edit /etc/sendmail.cf and put
> > this in:

> The experts on comp.mail.sendmail really disfavor diddling
> /etc/sendmail.cf (which is no longer there, but in /etc/mail/sendmail.cf
> anyway in the newer versions of sendmail), but recommend editing the
> simpler sendmail.mc file instead. The comparable line would be:

> dnl Use your.isp.neme as "smart" relay host. (19.6.47)
> define(`SMART_HOST', `your.isp.name')

> and then re-run m4 to generate the new sendmail.cf file.

True, but as the OP said he would be newbie and sendmail should run on his system
(preinstalled MTA on most distros)
it should be a lot easier for him, to change this one line and reload sendmail, than
figuring
out how to build a new sendmail.cf with m4.

Anyway, his distro should have some tool to set this and make it even easier, but I
don't know about mandrake,
as I use SuSE which comes with yast, that allows easy sendmail setup (ie. if you're
on dialup and want to set sendmail
expensive) of course this setup tool want let you do much with sendmail, but for
most home users it's quite enough...

Michael Heiming

- Show quoted text -

Quote:

> > # "Smart" relay host (may be null)
> > DS<your_ISP_mailserver>

> > Don't touch anything else in this file, unless you are absolutly sure what
> > you're doing.
> > Now reload sendmail with it's startup files:

> > /sbin/init.d/sendmail reload
> > or
> > /usr/sbin/rcsendmail reload

> > Send some mails and check
> > /var/log/mail

> > If you have problems post the output!

> > > My question is, what do I need to setup to read my mail from my Windows
> > > machine using Outlook 2000?  I can read it from Linux using Kmail, etc., so
> > > I know the transfer from the POP accounts worked fine.  As stated I can ping
> > > the mailhub (using either the IP address or the name (mailsys.mydomain.com))
> > > from the Windows machine, but Outlook states it can't connect with the
> > > mailhub.  Do I need NIS?  NFS?  Samba?  Sendmail?  Procmail?  Something
> > > else?

> > > TIA,

> > > James

> > For POP3 you could go with qpopper from eudora as other suggested, it's easy to
> > setup
> > and comes with detailed instructions.

> > Only problem could be your usage of Outlook, which is prone to make trouble, I
> > would
> > use something different, pegasus or eudora MUA have both more features than
> > anyone
> > needs and work without any problems.

> > Good luck

> > Michael Heiming

> --
>  .~.  Jean-David Beyer           Registered Linux User 85642.
>  /V\                             Registered Machine    73926.
> /( )\ Shrewsbury, New Jersey
> ^^-^^ 7:25am up 16 days, 15:52, 4 users, load average: 2.08, 2.08, 2.07

 
 
 

Mail Server Newbie

Post by Jeremiah DeWitt Weine » Fri, 16 Feb 2001 01:17:03



> I'm not a big sendmail fan myself, but it does have one big advantage
> for most Linux users: It comes with most Linux distributions.

        Hey, Windows came with my computer, but I don't regard it as an
advantage.  <g>  I agree that usually sendmail in your distribution's
default configuration will do what you want without too much trouble.  The
problems arise when you want to start changing things.  A guy sophisticated
enough to set up his own multi-drop mail server will probably want to do that.
Of course, he could probably grok sendmail well enough to do what he wants,
but why go through the extra pain?  (Not to mention sendmail's rotten security
record, although it _has_ gotten better as of late.)

JDW

 
 
 

Mail Server Newbie

Post by Rod Smi » Fri, 16 Feb 2001 04:58:40




Quote:

> But a second big advantage is that there is Usenet group:
> comp.mail.sendmail where a group of extremely knowledgeable people
> rapidly answer questions. There are also a few people in this newsgroup
> that can do the same, but the other is the appropriate one. (Of course,
> there is probably a newsgroup for qmail and Exim as well, but I never
> looked.)

A grep on my .newsrc file finds hits for qmail, but not for Exim or
Postfix. I know that there are qmail and Postfix mailing lists (I
subscribed to both for a while). Probably for sendmail and Exim, too,
but I've not checked.

--

http://www.rodsbooks.com
Author of books on Linux & multi-OS configuration

 
 
 

Mail Server Newbie

Post by Rod Smi » Fri, 16 Feb 2001 05:07:04







>> > > I have Mandrake Linux 7.2 (minimal install) on a Pentium Celeron 400MHz with
>> > > 32MB RAM.

> Anyway, his distro should have some tool to set this and make it even easier, but I
> don't know about mandrake,

I missed the comment about the original poster using Mandrake. Mandrake
uses Postfix as its default MTA. As such, it's probably best to *NOT*
install sendmail, but reconfigure Postfix as required. Of course, if you
really WANT to use sendmail, you can rip out Postfix and install
sendmail, but that's just extra effort. Since that post also mentioned
installing sendmail, it's unclear if this has already been done or if it
might perhaps be running BOTH Postfix AND sendmail, which could
conceivably cause conflicts or peculiar behavior.


> My question is, what do I need to setup to read my mail from my Windows
> machine using Outlook 2000?  I can read it from Linux using Kmail, etc., so
> I know the transfer from the POP accounts worked fine.

If this much is working, you're most of the way there. You just need a
POP or IMAP server for Linux, to let your local network systems read the
mail. I believe both come in a package called imap on Mandrake, so just
install that and, if necessary, futz with the appropriate /etc/xinetd.d/
configuration files to enable the server(s). (You'll need to restart
xinetd so it knows to handle the new servers.)

--

http://www.rodsbooks.com
Author of books on Linux & multi-OS configuration

 
 
 

Mail Server Newbie

Post by James Horvat » Fri, 16 Feb 2001 06:50:29


Thank you all for the responses. To clarify a couple issues and keep you all
up to date (if you care):

1). Mandrake 7.2 minimal install did in fact install sendmail, not postfix.
This may have been a recent change to Mandrake?

2). At the behest of the original responder, and after reviewing countless
web pages on the differences between qmail and sendmail, I yanked sendmail
off the system and installed qmail 1.03 from source. The installation has
apparently gone smoothly as all of the tests proposed fire without a hitch.
I did pick up the O'Reilly Sendmail book (a.k.a. the bat book) but haven't
put much time into reading it yet. It is my intention to switch over to the
more universal standard (sendmail) at some point in the distant future.

Which leaves me a little in the dark. I still need a way to connect to the
mail directories with Microsoft Outlook (for both sending and receiving).
Many of you have mentioned Qpopper (which I'll download in a little bit),
but I'd like to make sure I'm not overlapping or running more than I need
to. Presently I have Fetchmail, Qmail, and (soon) Qpopper running (in
addition to some recommended toolsets like qmail daemontools). Is this the
best combination of ease and efficiency?

Outlook sends messages to Qmail smtp which sends the mail to my ISP.
Messages from the ISP are grabbed by Fetchmail, stored on the Linux server,
and delivered to Outlook by Qpopper/imapd/ipop3d. This is more or less my
understanding of the process. Can Qmail act as the pop3/imap server to
replace Qpopper/imapd/ipop3d? If so, how?

James







> >> > > I have Mandrake Linux 7.2 (minimal install) on a Pentium Celeron
400MHz with
> >> > > 32MB RAM.

> > Anyway, his distro should have some tool to set this and make it even
easier, but I
> > don't know about mandrake,

> I missed the comment about the original poster using Mandrake. Mandrake
> uses Postfix as its default MTA. As such, it's probably best to *NOT*
> install sendmail, but reconfigure Postfix as required. Of course, if you
> really WANT to use sendmail, you can rip out Postfix and install
> sendmail, but that's just extra effort. Since that post also mentioned
> installing sendmail, it's unclear if this has already been done or if it
> might perhaps be running BOTH Postfix AND sendmail, which could
> conceivably cause conflicts or peculiar behavior.


> > My question is, what do I need to setup to read my mail from my Windows
> > machine using Outlook 2000?  I can read it from Linux using Kmail, etc.,
so
> > I know the transfer from the POP accounts worked fine.

> If this much is working, you're most of the way there. You just need a
> POP or IMAP server for Linux, to let your local network systems read the
> mail. I believe both come in a package called imap on Mandrake, so just
> install that and, if necessary, futz with the appropriate /etc/xinetd.d/
> configuration files to enable the server(s). (You'll need to restart
> xinetd so it knows to handle the new servers.)

> --

> http://www.rodsbooks.com
> Author of books on Linux & multi-OS configuration

 
 
 

Mail Server Newbie

Post by jbuch.. » Fri, 16 Feb 2001 10:41:43



> I'm not a big sendmail fan myself, but it does have one big advantage
> for most Linux users: It comes with most Linux distributions. (A couple

For those running Mandrake:

The postfix rpm that comes with Mandrake 7.0 works fine with Redhat
6.2, I suspect that any Mandrake/Redhat releases of similar vintage
allow this. The compatibility goes both ways.

--

=================== http://www.buchanan1.net/ ==========================
"Interested in tautologies? Here's one for you: All the trademarks
 mentioned in this document are the property of their respective
 owners." -perlwin32faq
================= Visit: http://www.thehungersite.com ==================

 
 
 

Mail Server Newbie

Post by Rod Smi » Fri, 16 Feb 2001 12:45:44


[Posted and mailed]



Quote:> Thank you all for the responses. To clarify a couple issues and keep you all
> up to date (if you care):

> 1). Mandrake 7.2 minimal install did in fact install sendmail, not postfix.
> This may have been a recent change to Mandrake?

My Mandrake 7.2 system installed Postfix but not sendmail. I don't
believe I did a minimal install, though; I believe I chose a custom
install. The CD-ROM has RPMs for both. It sounds like Mandrake does
sendmail for a minimal install and Postfix for others, for some reason
I can't fathom. I believe they've been doing Postfix by default, at
least on the installation methods I've used, since Mandrake version 6.1
or 6.2.

Quote:> 2). At the behest of the original responder, and after reviewing countless
> web pages on the differences between qmail and sendmail, I yanked sendmail
> off the system and installed qmail 1.03 from source. The installation has
> apparently gone smoothly as all of the tests proposed fire without a hitch.
> I did pick up the O'Reilly Sendmail book (a.k.a. the bat book) but haven't
> put much time into reading it yet. It is my intention to switch over to the
> more universal standard (sendmail) at some point in the distant future.

My advice is that if you get *ANY* MTA working to your satisfaction,
switch only if you've got a compelling reason to do so. This can be
because you want to learn another, because you've found a problem with
whatever you're using, because another server supports features you
want to investigate, or various other reasons, but not because one
program is more or less "standard" than another. (Sometimes installing
an alternative server on a spare test system makes sense; you don't
want to interrupt regular mail delivery just to experiment, for
instance.) All SMTP MTAs are supposed to conform to various RFCs
defining e-mail transmission, and AFAIK all of the major ones we've
been discussing do a good enough job of this that they can talk to each
other and exchange mail quite reliably. Switching MTAs can be a pain --
it's a whole new configuration system to learn, and there are sometimes
subtle or not-so-subtle incompatibilities with local software, so the
effort just isn't worth it if the thing's working to your satisfaction,
unless you've got a compelling reason to change.

Quote:> Which leaves me a little in the dark. I still need a way to connect to the
> mail directories with Microsoft Outlook (for both sending and receiving).
> Many of you have mentioned Qpopper (which I'll download in a little bit),
> but I'd like to make sure I'm not overlapping or running more than I need
> to. Presently I have Fetchmail, Qmail, and (soon) Qpopper running (in
> addition to some recommended toolsets like qmail daemontools). Is this the
> best combination of ease and efficiency?

I'm not familiar with Qpopper, but to access the Linux mail server's
mail queues with mail clients on other systems, you need to run a pull
mail server. The most common protocols for this are POP and IMAP.
Qpopper is, if I'm not mistaken, one of several POP servers. I believe
it's designed for use with qmail, but I don't know that for sure.

Quote:> Outlook sends messages to Qmail smtp which sends the mail to my ISP.
> Messages from the ISP are grabbed by Fetchmail, stored on the Linux server,
> and delivered to Outlook by Qpopper/imapd/ipop3d. This is more or less my
> understanding of the process.

Correct, although qmail may or may not forward outgoing mail via your
ISP; it could send it directly to the addressee system.

Quote:> Can Qmail act as the pop3/imap server to
> replace Qpopper/imapd/ipop3d? If so, how?

I'm pretty sure that qmail doesn't support POP or IMAP directly; that's
what Qpopper is for. I've never configured a qmail-based system for POP
or IMAP, though, so I can't give any advice from experience on this.

--

http://www.rodsbooks.com
Author of books on Linux & multi-OS configuration

 
 
 

1. Mail Server - Newbie

Hi,

I'm new to Linux - working on figuring out how to use linux to act as a
mail server.  It seems you need to use sendmail, but the documentation
is somewhat over my head - Can anyone advise on the basic changes i need
to make to sendmail.mc to enable me to send / receive messages? (RHat
linux 8.0)

Also how does sendmail know user's email adresses - is there a conf file
to add e-mail users or does it defaul to something like

Thanks for your help - any inputs on where to get started reading etc.
are greatly appreciated.

Tom

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