term vs slirp (slip emulator)

term vs slirp (slip emulator)

Post by Aria Prima Noviant » Sat, 20 May 1995 04:00:00



Hi, I just found a program called slirp, that does a slip/clisp emulation.
I'm using term right now, and I want to know is there anyone that tried both
of them, performance comparison between them?

Thanks a lot,
Aria

This is what I got from slirp readme, but I want to know the real experience.

* Only needs compilation on one side of the link (the remote side)

* No need to "port" (termify) software

* Can be used by non-UNIX users (DOS/Win/Mac/etc.)

* Is more secure

* Is easier to use by multiple users (since you're using the kernel's
  networking code, which is already multi-user (well, should be...))

.. Advantages of term over SLiRP:

* Compression (this is planned in SLiRP.  Infact, I plan to "borrow" the
  compression code from term :)

* Term has more complete emulation (see below)

* Tupload (working on it)

.. Advantages of SLiRP over real (C)SLIP/PPP accounts:

* No need to have your own IP address.  This can be useful if you are
  running out of IP's (as the whole Internet is)

* You can connect your whole LAN to the 'Net without even needing one IP
  address.  eg: If you have a LAN of 3 PC's at home, just route all packets
  to the host that has the modem, have it forward IP packets and route all
  packets over SLiRP.  Easy!

* Speed.  Depending on your situation, the speed improvement can be
  significant.  In real (C)SLIP/PPP connections, the IP packets are sent to
  and from the remote host directly, whereas with SLiRP, it's the
  remote-host which takes care of all this, SLiRP only (tries to) makes sure
  the modem is used to full capacity.  It's sorta like a "funneling" effect,

  as long as the remote-host has a fast connection to the 'Net, it'll keep
  enough data buffered to keep SLiRP happy.

* Security.  No need to worry about IP address spoofing, ICMP attacks, etc.
  You dictate how much access to grant outside users to your home machine,
  via port redirection.  (Watch those X redirections!  Make sure you have
  access control enabled, or you can be snooped with the greatest of ease)

.. Advantages of real (C)SLIP/PPP over SLiRP:

* You get your own IP address.  This lets other people ftp into your home
  machine without needing to use a weird port number, etc.

* All programs will work.  In SLiRP, some programs may not work because you
  do not have your own IP address, so some programs need to be "emulated".

* Speed.  Again, depending on your situation, speed may be better than with
  SLiRP. (eg: because SLiRP will be run on a machine, competing with other
  processes, it will slow down on high loads, whereas with real (C)SLIP/PPP,
  the remote-host usually only acts as a "router" so it won't be prone to
  high loads)

 
 
 

term vs slirp (slip emulator)

Post by Lou Parr » Sun, 21 May 1995 04:00:00



: Hi, I just found a program called slirp, that does a slip/clisp emulation.
: I'm using term right now, and I want to know is there anyone that tried both
: of them, performance comparison between them?

: Thanks a lot,
: Aria

: This is what I got from slirp readme, but I want to know the real experience.

...Stuff Deleted...

I've used both...
Overall, I find that slirp is MUCH easier, assuming you have your network
configuration set up properly.

Slirp allows you to use many common networking tools without any recompiling.

And, since you are using the slip interface in the Kernel, it is
transparent to most programs...It also works if you have a network set up
locally between your computer and others, to forward ip packets from
other computers around you to the internet (like a gateway, sorta)...
However, certain programs won't work at all because they require the
ability to tell a remote program information about where to connect on
your computer...And this information can never quite be accurate with slirp.

There is an effort underway to emulate certain protocols like talk, irc,
etc... (Note: ftp & http work fine).

Term, on the other hand, works well for having multiple logins on a
remote computer.  But, all networking programs myst be compiled with
support for Term, to utilize its connection.

It has absolutely no kernel support.  And, porting many programs yourself
is difficult.

It DOES, however, have slightly more potential than slirp in that if you
spend the time, most network actions can be performed as if you were on
the internet yourself...Perhaps in future versions this will become more so.

        Overall, I'd suggest slirp, since it's much easier and more
compatable, but if you want to spend the time, term is also good.

        -Lou Parrot


 
 
 

term vs slirp (slip emulator)

Post by Between 408 and 510. » Sun, 28 May 1995 04:00:00



>Term, on the other hand, works well for having multiple logins on a
>remote computer.  But, all networking programs myst be compiled with
>support for Term, to utilize its connection.
>It has absolutely no kernel support.  And, porting many programs yourself
>is difficult.

        What are you talking about? It only took me a couple of minutes
to make netscape work with term - I used a hex-editor to replace dynamic
library reference "libc" with "libt" in the binary. Voila!

Quote:>    Overall, I'd suggest slirp, since it's much easier and more
>compatable, but if you want to spend the time, term is also good.

        I spent more time compiling term on both platforms (Linux/SunOS)
than making it work. Escape/ignore 17, 19; and it's a breeze.

        Leo

 
 
 

term vs slirp (slip emulator)

Post by Matthew Shar » Mon, 29 May 1995 04:00:00



: Hi, I just found a program called slirp, that does a slip/clisp emulation.
: I'm using term right now, and I want to know is there anyone that tried both
: of them, performance comparison between them?

[stuff deleted]

Can anyone tell me where to get hold of slirp? Sounds like it could
be handy...(I have a 38k8 serial link in my room!) netscape etc would
be usefull!!

Thanks a lot,
Mat

 
 
 

term vs slirp (slip emulator)

Post by Yoo Chul Chun » Tue, 30 May 1995 04:00:00



Quote:>    What are you talking about? It only took me a couple of minutes
>to make netscape work with term - I used a hex-editor to replace dynamic
>library reference "libc" with "libt" in the binary. Voila!

There's an even easier way. You just get the termify package and do
'termify <filename>', and you get a term compatible program.


 
 
 

1. term vs slirp (slip emulator)?

Hi, I just found a program called slirp, that does a slip/clisp emulation.
I'm using term right now, and I want to know is there anyone that tried both
of them, performance comparison between them?

Thanks a lot,
Aria

This is what I got from slirp readme, but I want to know the real experience.

.. Advantages of SLiRP over term:

* Only needs compilation on one side of the link (the remote side)

* No need to "port" (termify) software

* Can be used by non-UNIX users (DOS/Win/Mac/etc.)

* Is more secure

* Is easier to use by multiple users (since you're using the kernel's
  networking code, which is already multi-user (well, should be...))

.. Advantages of term over SLiRP:

* Compression (this is planned in SLiRP.  Infact, I plan to "borrow" the
  compression code from term :)

* Term has more complete emulation (see below)

* Tupload (working on it)

.. Advantages of SLiRP over real (C)SLIP/PPP accounts:

* No need to have your own IP address.  This can be useful if you are
  running out of IP's (as the whole Internet is)

* You can connect your whole LAN to the 'Net without even needing one IP
  address.  eg: If you have a LAN of 3 PC's at home, just route all packets
  to the host that has the modem, have it forward IP packets and route all
  packets over SLiRP.  Easy!

* Speed.  Depending on your situation, the speed improvement can be
  significant.  In real (C)SLIP/PPP connections, the IP packets are sent to
  and from the remote host directly, whereas with SLiRP, it's the
  remote-host which takes care of all this, SLiRP only (tries to) makes sure
  the modem is used to full capacity.  It's sorta like a "funneling" effect,
  as long as the remote-host has a fast connection to the 'Net, it'll keep
  enough data buffered to keep SLiRP happy.

* Security.  No need to worry about IP address spoofing, ICMP attacks, etc.
  You dictate how much access to grant outside users to your home machine,
  via port redirection.  (Watch those X redirections!  Make sure you have
  access control enabled, or you can be snooped with the greatest of ease)

.. Advantages of real (C)SLIP/PPP over SLiRP:

* You get your own IP address.  This lets other people ftp into your home
  machine without needing to use a weird port number, etc.

* All programs will work.  In SLiRP, some programs may not work because you
  do not have your own IP address, so some programs need to be "emulated".

* Speed.  Again, depending on your situation, speed may be better than with
  SLiRP. (eg: because SLiRP will be run on a machine, competing with other
  processes, it will slow down on high loads, whereas with real (C)SLIP/PPP,
  the remote-host usually only acts as a "router" so it won't be prone to
  high loads)

2. Processors for Linux (CPU) ??

3. Slirp (SLIP emulator) configuration.

4. Quicktime plug-in for linux?

5. Best linux-unix link, pppd-slirp or term-term?

6. suid script support by kernel?

7. TERM and term emulator at vt100 but only 8 lines of vi

8. Firewall Ports

9. Slip vs Term

10. TERM vs SLIP

11. TERM vs. SLIP

12. TERM vs. SLIP???

13. TERM (the non-SLIP SLIP)