Questions (linux coexist with DOS; flavors of linux; X)

Questions (linux coexist with DOS; flavors of linux; X)

Post by Ryan A. Carte » Thu, 17 Oct 1996 04:00:00



I'm planning to install linux soon (I have Slackware on a CD),
but have a few quick questions.  Primarily, I need to know if it
is possible for linux to co-exist with DOS on a partition.  My
impression is that it is not, but I'm unsure.

Also (big opinion question here), I'm trying to decide what is
the best flavor of linux to use.  As I mentioned, I have
Slackware (2.?.?) but was reading about redhat last night.  If
you have an opinion on these or other versions (with
explanation), I'd love to hear it.

Finally,  I need a little explanation about the X system.  X is
an interface (a shell) for unix machines that provides a GUI
interface.  But X is not enough?  You then need something to run
on top of that?  Here's where Motif comes in, right?  Is it
possible to run with only X?  What benefits are there in having
Motif (or some others, perhaps)?  Are X and Motif available via
FTP on the net?  Is there an expense to use them?

<sigh> Sorry for the over-abundance of questions, but TIA for
the help!  Oh, please respond via eMail.

Thanks again.

Ryan Carter

 
 
 

Questions (linux coexist with DOS; flavors of linux; X)

Post by jo.. » Thu, 17 Oct 1996 04:00:00



Quote:

> I'm planning to install linux soon (I have Slackware on a CD),
> but have a few quick questions.  Primarily, I need to know if it
> is possible for linux to co-exist with DOS on a partition.  My
> impression is that it is not, but I'm unsure.

It's possible, you can install Linux in a separate FAT directory.
Linux will use the UMSDOS fs on top of FAT and use this directory as
root. It's not a good solution, but if you are absolutely positive you
won't repartition your disk it'll work.

A better solution is to use FIPS to shrink your DOS partition
and create separate partitions for Linux. That way you don't have
to reinstall all your DOS/Win stuff.

Quote:

> Also (big opinion question here), I'm trying to decide what is
> the best flavor of linux to use.  As I mentioned, I have
> Slackware (2.?.?) but was reading about redhat last night.  If
> you have an opinion on these or other versions (with
> explanation), I'd love to hear it.

Slackware 2.# is outdated. Get 3.1 if you want to use Slackware.  I
prefer RedHat because of the packaging system, frequent updates
and the teTeX distribution (haven't seen the latest NTeX, though)
I don't think RedHat has options for UMSDOS installation, maybe
Slackware has?

Quote:

> Finally,  I need a little explanation about the X system.  X is
> an interface (a shell) for unix machines that provides a GUI
> interface.  But X is not enough?  You then need something to run
> on top of that?  Here's where Motif comes in, right?  Is it
> possible to run with only X?  What benefits are there in having
> Motif (or some others, perhaps)?  Are X and Motif available via
> FTP on the net?  Is there an expense to use them?

X11 draws windows on your screen (to put it simple :-) On top of X11
you use a window manager (wm) to draw borders around windows, raise
and iconify them, provide system menues etc. The wm also provides the
look and feel of the windows borders and system menues etc. Buttons
and ?stuff? ?inside applications? use widgets to draw buttons and
menus. Motif provides such widgets, and so does Athena. There is also
a motif wm (mwm) that provides the same look and feel for the window
frames/borders and system menues as the Motif widgets does, that way
you can have a consistent look on your desktop.

Motif is a commercial product, so you can't download it for free.
However, many apps come statically linked with the Motif libraries so
you can still run them with a Motif look, but not with the Motif
wm. Also some Motif library clones has shown up, so you can run some
dynamically linked Motif based apps. Most other window managers are
free, and some of them looks very much like mwm (like the lesstif wm,
or a properly configured fvwm2).

Bottom line is; you don't need Motif to use X11.

--
Jon Martin Solaas


 
 
 

Questions (linux coexist with DOS; flavors of linux; X)

Post by Evan Jeffr » Thu, 17 Oct 1996 04:00:00



: but have a few quick questions.  Primarily, I need to know if it
: is possible for linux to co-exist with DOS on a partition.  My
: impression is that it is not, but I'm unsure.

slackware can install on a dos partition.  to do it as such, you boot to dos
and then use loadlin to load linux.  It is supposed to work well.  I don't
know if other distributions make it easy to do this.  I seem to remember
hearing that red-hat didn't.  please don't flame if I am wrong.  anyway, I
wouldn't recommend doing this.  It makes things unnecisarily complicated,
especially if you later want to move linux to a 2extfs partition.  for the
bold of heart, FIPS will shrink a dos partition to make room for a 2extfs,
and in the event that you didn't like linux, could grow your dos partition
back to full size.  Partition magic will do the same thing, if you have it.

: Finally,  I need a little explanation about the X system.  X is
: an interface (a shell) for unix machines that provides a GUI
: interface.  But X is not enough?  You then need something to run

Well, in theory, you can run with just X: put a color_xterm in your .xinitrc
file, then whenever you start X, it will run an xterm, which will be the
parent of all Xwindows processes.  X will then close when you quit that
xterm.  however, this is really neuters X, as there are no built in
provisions to move or resize windows, among other things.  You want a window
manager which will put borders on windows and let you resize/move them, plus
give menus and such.  In short, all that makes a GUI useful.  there are
several window managers, fvwm should come with your distribution.  there are
two things called motif.  the motif libraries, which many programs require
to run, regardless of window manager.  This is a commerical library.  In
some cases, you can use "less-tif" which emulates much of the motif
functionality.  the motif window manager is a window manager that I have no
experience with, but provides similar functionality to any other window
manager.  It is also commercial.

Evan Jeffrey

: on top of that?  Here's where Motif comes in, right?  Is it
: possible to run with only X?  What benefits are there in having
: Motif (or some others, perhaps)?  Are X and Motif available via
: FTP on the net?  Is there an expense to use them?
:
: <sigh> Sorry for the over-abundance of questions, but TIA for
: the help!  Oh, please respond via eMail.
:
: Thanks again.
:
: Ryan Carter

:
:

 
 
 

Questions (linux coexist with DOS; flavors of linux; X)

Post by Grant Edwar » Fri, 18 Oct 1996 04:00:00



: Finally,  I need a little explanation about the X system.  X is
: an interface (a shell) for unix machines that provides a GUI
: interface.  But X is not enough?  You then need something to run
: on top of that?  Here's where Motif comes in, right?  Is it
: possible to run with only X?  What benefits are there in having
: Motif (or some others, perhaps)?  Are X and Motif available via
: FTP on the net?  Is there an expense to use them?

The short version:

 1) X is a protocol that specifies a method for programs to draw stuff
    on displays (possibly via a network).

 2) Motif is a set of library routines that can be used to construct a user
    interface by providing the programmer with pre-defined "widgets" like
    text entry boxes, buttons, sliders, etc.  Motif isn't free.  You can
    get Motif for Linux for about $150.

 3) There are many other user interface libraries (many free) that provide
    similar functionality.

 4) You don't _need_ Motif unless there is a specific program that you want
    to run that requires Motif (there aren't too many programs like that).

If you've got web access, I wrote a paper that answers most of your X
questions.  Take a look at

  http://www.visi.com/~grante/Xtut/

If you don't have web access, I could e-mail a postscript version.

--
Grant Edwards        | Microsoft isn't the   | Yow!  I'm rated PG-34!!
Rosemount Inc.       | answer. Microsoft     |
                     | is the question, and  |

 
 
 

1. Mini Linux coexists in DOS partition and boot from DOS

Mini Linux coexists in DOS partition and boots from DOS,

ftp://frozen-wasteland.winternet.com/users/stud/linux/

Warning this server also contains obscene material.

--
Michael Louis Scott
Greenwich, Connecticut 06830 U.S.A.
Scott's Internet Hotlist  
ftp://hobbes.nmsu.edu/os2/network/tcpip/scott003.zip
http://sprawl.sensemedia.net:8080/people/scott/scott.html

2. Hercules Stingray and Linux..

3. DOS 6.0 + Linux coexist ?

4. X in 16bpp mode with an PCI ATI Mach32

5. Help with Linux and Dos coexisting

6. Linux on IBM Thinkpad R32-M8A

7. Linux and DOS coexisting on 2 HD system

8. Linux Problems

9. DOS 6.0 + Linux coexist ?

10. Coexist Linux-DOS info

11. Linux and DOS refuse to coexist!!

12. New to Linux, Flavor questions

13. Another FreeBSD & Linux coexisting question.