Newbie wnats to learn

Newbie wnats to learn

Post by R. Frank Loude » Sun, 11 Aug 1996 04:00:00



I need some advice on the best way to learn this wonderfuly confusing
operating system.

Thanks for reading my attachment,

[ Learn.Linux 2K ]
I'm new to Unix in general and Linux specifically. I am enthralled with the
power and versatility of this operating system. But I am not learning
fast enough to suit my impatient self.

I have recently been looking at the Debian release. I have the Slackware
3.0 on my system at home now. I don't intend for this to be a gripe but
it may sound this way. Debian appeals to me because it installs piece by
piece and I feel like that might be a very good way to learn one's way
around this maze of possibilities.

I appreciate that Slackware has put the entire package together and I
have had little trouble installing and configuring some of the absolute
necessities (net access via PPP to my ISP mostly and X) and most of the
software installed at the initial setup works, right out of the box, as
they say.

However, in my entheusiasm, I have downloaded two or three software
applications and have yet to manage to get one of them working. I
understand one of my weaknesses, outside of not knowing Linux very well,
is I am also new to C/C++. I also have an idea that GNAT (yes, I know Ada
is kinda grusome to most C programmers!) and POV may be a bit more than I
should have bit off for starters.

And I have a bit of education in the field but the system we worked on
at school was VMS and believe me I never got near the operations room. I
was much to busy writing loops in Ada to read in the "Findley Farm
Team's" averages!

So, while I am contemplating Debian, I would hate to give up the func-
tionality I have now.

Please, some of you who are experienced with Linux and C, what is the
best route for me to take?

I will be getting the Kernighan/Ritchie books. Should I stick with Slack-
ware and utilize what I already have working? Or risk long and
frustrating nights attempting to get the Debian release installed. Would
it be best to give up computers altogether and take up stamp collecting
again???    ;^)

Sorry. I see I'm running off at the fingers again. Thanks to all who have
helped me in the past. And thanks to those who've managed to get this far
in this "treatise", and finally, a special thanks to those who might find
time to share some "words of wisdom" with a new comer.

 
 
 

Newbie wnats to learn

Post by Henry Cros » Mon, 12 Aug 1996 04:00:00



> I need some advice on the best way to learn this wonderfuly confusing
> operating system.

 Personally I'd start with either Red Hats' Doctor Linux or Yggdrasil's Linux Bible.
(Well actually I am starting with. :)
--
H.Cross

=============================================================================
Work:     | OS/2 - Awesome multi-tasking capabilities.
Play:     | DOS and it's graphical menu system. (Windows)
Learn:    | U of NIX (LINUX rocks!)
=============================================================================

 
 
 

Newbie wnats to learn

Post by Jim Staffo » Tue, 13 Aug 1996 04:00:00



: >
: > I need some advice on the best way to learn this wonderfuly confusing
: > operating system.

I just recently installed slackware 3.0 (about 5 weeks ago). The best way
to learn to compile programs is to read the files that come with them ie:
README, INSTALL, ect. The INSTALL file is really helpful as it usally
tells you what you have to do to compile the program. The most problems
that I've had are not having the proper libraries, you'll see an error
message saying something like libc03 not found or something simular. The
README file will usally tell you where to get the libraries you need.

I've found the best way to learn is just doing it. I've bought 2 Linux
books so far and in my opion they aren't worth the money I spent on them.

Good luck,

jamess

 
 
 

Newbie wnats to learn

Post by Henry Cros » Tue, 13 Aug 1996 04:00:00





> : >
> : > I need some advice on the best way to learn this wonderfuly confusing
> : > operating system.

> I just recently installed slackware 3.0 (about 5 weeks ago). The best way
> to learn to compile programs is to read the files that come with them ie:
> README, INSTALL, ect. The INSTALL file is really helpful as it usally
> tells you what you have to do to compile the program. The most problems
> that I've had are not having the proper libraries, you'll see an error
> message saying something like libc03 not found or something simular. The
> README file will usally tell you where to get the libraries you need.

> I've found the best way to learn is just doing it. I've bought 2 Linux
> books so far and in my opion they aren't worth the money I spent on them.

If you bought the Que or SAM's book's I'd have to agree.

regards,
H.Cross

 
 
 

Newbie wnats to learn

Post by Judith McMill » Tue, 13 Aug 1996 04:00:00


*snip*

: I just recently installed slackware 3.0 (about 5 weeks ago). The best way
: to learn to compile programs is to read the files that come with them ie:
: README, INSTALL, ect. The INSTALL file is really helpful as it usally
: tells you what you have to do to compile the program. The most problems
: that I've had are not having the proper libraries, you'll see an error
: message saying something like libc03 not found or something simular. The
: README file will usally tell you where to get the libraries you need.
:  
: I've found the best way to learn is just doing it. I've bought 2 Linux
: books so far and in my opion they aren't worth the money I spent on them.
:
: Good luck,
:
: jamess
:

Yeah, what he said... I put Linux on about two months ago... f**ked up a
bunch of things right from the get-go :).  As I progressed with installation
etc., and my eventual upgrade from kernel 1.2.13 to kernel 2.0.9, I learned
a LOT about what to do and what order to do it in... and what NOT to do.
There's no substitute for practical experience... although I strongly
recommend that you read EVERYTHING that the distribution says to read.  Doing
that will save you a good deal of grief and hair-tearing in the long run.

--jlmc
--
+=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=+
| "L'essentiel est invisible pour les       <~|\        _-~~~~\_          |
|  yeux... on ne vu bien q'avec le coeur."   \|/      /~__     /          |
| =====================`======,==`=====,===='====,===<-~  ~-_/~\          |
|       --Antoine de Sainte-Exupery,     /|\      /|\ \_     ~\/          |
|            _Le_Petit_Prince_           \|_>    <_|/   ~-____/~          |
+=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=+

 
 
 

Newbie wnats to learn

Post by Anatoly Akkerma » Fri, 16 Aug 1996 04:00:00



> I need some advice on the best way to learn this wonderfuly confusing
> operating system.

> Thanks for reading my attachment,

>     ---------------------------------------------------------------

> is I am also new to C/C++. I also have an idea that GNAT (yes, I know Ada
> is kinda grusome to most C programmers!) and POV may be a bit more than I
> should have bit off for starters.

> And I have a bit of education in the field but the system we worked on
> at school was VMS and believe me I never got near the operations room. I
> was much to busy writing loops in Ada to read in the "Findley Farm
> Team's" averages!

> So, while I am contemplating Debian, I would hate to give up the func-
> tionality I have now.

> Please, some of you who are experienced with Linux and C, what is the
> best route for me to take?

Get a couple of good books on C/C++ programming in UNIX environment. I
recommend O'Reilly and Associates printing company. They also have very
good sys admin and network admin books. check out their Web page
http://www.ora.com/catalog/index.html

They have reasonable prices and excellent books.

Start with

Practical C Programming (about 28 dollars)

Practical C++ Programming.
C++ the core language.

These two books you can get in a set for $40 if you buy it directly from
O'Reilly.

Do the exercises at the end of each chapter.

        Anatoly Akkerman.

 
 
 

Newbie wnats to learn

Post by Walter Smit » Sat, 17 Aug 1996 04:00:00




> > I need some advice on the best way to learn this wonderfuly confusing
> > operating system.
>         Anatoly Akkerman.


Greetings,
If you're writing loops in ADA, you really ARE in trouble !!!!

8-)        8-)

Get the HOWTO documents from a linux site, like sunsite.unc.edu or
ftp.linux.org or www.cdrom.com or ......
Theres lots of them.

Walt in Baltimore......

 
 
 

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