Plug And Play

Plug And Play

Post by Anand Thak » Thu, 14 Dec 1995 04:00:00



Are there any utilities to get plug and play devices to work on Linux?  I
have a "legacy" system, and hence have to use a special plug and play
driver to configure it on bootup.  It works fine if I load up in DOS and
have the driver init the card (which, by the way is a Supra 28.8
internal), then reboot into Linux.  Is there anyway to bypass this step?

                                Thanks,

--

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      ____|         /| /\/ /| /\/ />  / /-/ /| |< /_/ /<       |____
          |  "Evil will always triumph, because good is dumb." |
          |                                     -- Lord Helmet |

 
 
 

Plug And Play

Post by William Burr » Thu, 14 Dec 1995 04:00:00


: Are there any utilities to get plug and play devices to work on Linux?  I
: have a "legacy" system, and hence have to use a special plug and play
: driver to configure it on bootup.  It works fine if I load up in DOS and
: have the driver init the card (which, by the way is a Supra 28.8
: internal), then reboot into Linux.  Is there anyway to bypass this step?

Probably not.  But developers should know that Intel is giving away PnP
source code and documentation on CDROM.  PnP is not an impossibility on
LInux.

--
William Burrow  --  Fredericton Area Network

 
 
 

Plug And Play

Post by Cameron L. Spitz » Tue, 16 Jan 1996 04:00:00






>: : Are there any utilities to get plug and play devices to work on Linux?  I
>: : have a "legacy" system, and hence have to use a special plug and play
>: : driver to configure it on bootup.  It works fine if I load up in DOS and
>: : have the driver init the card (which, by the way is a Supra 28.8
>: : internal), then reboot into Linux.  Is there anyway to bypass this step?

>: Probably not.  But developers should know that Intel is giving away PnP
>: source code and documentation on CDROM.  PnP is not an impossibility on
>: LInux.

>I was thinking the same thing today as I was cursing Creative for all
>that PnP *that complicates use with Linux.  We need a way for Linux
>to initialize the PnP cards.

It's about time we started talking about this.  Microsoft Plug and
Play is about to become pervasive in ISA cards.  I know of products
in development at two companies that are likely to be big sellers
which will require it.  There will be no other way to activate them.
Nothing can stop it.  If Linux is to be viable
on 1996's ISA hardware, it *must* do Plug and Play and do it
correctly.  Sad but true.  At least the spec is available.

Cameron
--
http://www.veryComputer.com/

 
 
 

Plug And Play

Post by Matt Masu » Tue, 16 Jan 1996 04:00:00



: : Are there any utilities to get plug and play devices to work on Linux?  I
: : have a "legacy" system, and hence have to use a special plug and play
: : driver to configure it on bootup.  It works fine if I load up in DOS and
: : have the driver init the card (which, by the way is a Supra 28.8
: : internal), then reboot into Linux.  Is there anyway to bypass this step?

: Probably not.  But developers should know that Intel is giving away PnP
: source code and documentation on CDROM.  PnP is not an impossibility on
: LInux.

I was thinking the same thing today as I was cursing Creative for all
that PnP *that complicates use with Linux.  We need a way for Linux
to initialize the PnP cards.  Now I'm not a Linux guru by any means, but
I would guess that support in the kernel would do the trick, or maybe a
module.  Comments anyone?  I think that such support would eliminate a
lot of trouble people have with this PnP stuff (Creative Labs sound
boards and 3Com Ether cards come to mind).

--
*  Matthew C. Masuda        * "That which does not kill us makes  *

 
 
 

Plug And Play

Post by Dave Pla » Thu, 18 Jan 1996 04:00:00


Quote:>It's about time we started talking about this.  Microsoft Plug and
>Play is about to become pervasive in ISA cards.  I know of products
>in development at two companies that are likely to be big sellers
>which will require it.  There will be no other way to activate them.
>Nothing can stop it.  If Linux is to be viable
>on 1996's ISA hardware, it *must* do Plug and Play and do it
>correctly.  Sad but true.  At least the spec is available.

I'm afraid agree.  I've heard from one or two people who are having
difficulty with their PCnet '961 network cards.  They work OK after a
hard boot, but don't come up after a soft-reboot, and I suspect that the
reason is the lack of complete P&P initialization at soft-reboot time.

--

      USNAIL: The 3DO Company, Systems Software group
              600 Galveston Drive
              Redwood City, CA  94063

 
 
 

Plug And Play

Post by Peat Blackthor » Fri, 19 Jan 1996 04:00:00



: It's about time we started talking about this.  Microsoft Plug and
: Play is about to become pervasive in ISA cards.  I know of products
: in development at two companies that are likely to be big sellers
: which will require it.  There will be no other way to activate them.
: Nothing can stop it.  If Linux is to be viable
: on 1996's ISA hardware, it *must* do Plug and Play and do it
: correctly.  Sad but true.  At least the spec is available.

        I dunno.  I dont think its that horrid of a task.  Linux is a
wonderful thing, and I dont really see it as that horrid of a sacrifice
to make it PnP compatable.  Hey, it might even make the market for Linux
expand ..

--
 __                       __                                           __
/_/\  Peter Blackthorne  /_/\  "Reality is just a collective hunch."  /_/\

 
 
 

1. A plug for the Plug-and-Play Howto

I read the first half of the "Plug and Play Howto" and it provides the
information needed to resolve hardware resource conflicts.
Here is the canonical link:
http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/Plug-and-Play-HOWTO.html

One key piece of information that this document provides is to advise
users to use "Plug and Play" mode for ISA cards when available.  Then,
when setting the BIOS for OS type, select non-plug-and-play for Linux.
 This simply means that the motherboard initialization routines will
try to properly allocate resources (before OS boot begins).

This information helped me a lot, when I was having difficulty setting
up a Linux box, using a spare Micronics W6-Li motherboard.  This
board's setup routine ("BIOS setup") does not have a screen where
resources can be reserved for use by non-pnp-isa cards.  The
documentation for this motherboard should probably state the board
works only with ISA cards which can be configured plug-and-play. I
also had to "force" resource re-allocation to totally resolve the
system conflicts.  After resetting, the OS booted with no conflicts,
and Kudzu could see my "new" devices. (Sweet!)

By the way, the board is working great as my first dual processor
system with a shiny, new kernel (2.4.20-pre10) which supports USB 2.0
(NEC chipset on a pci card).  The performance is not bad (2-200MHz
cpu's, 256 MB RAM- makes for a very usable system.)  I wouldn't put
these systems in the trash heap, yet.  But, if you are throwing them
out, I'll take 'em ;-)

--Douglas Mayne

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