Telnet question

Telnet question

Post by Toolma » Thu, 18 Mar 1999 04:00:00



If I'm trying to connect to my Linux box via Telnet (from my Windows 98)
station wouldn't you expect the root account to work?
Each time I try this connection with the root account it won't connect
(states my login is incorrect).  Any ideas?  I can most definitely login
directly to the system using the root account.........Problem with telnet?
 
 
 

Telnet question

Post by Steve Em » Thu, 18 Mar 1999 04:00:00




Quote:>If I'm trying to connect to my Linux box via Telnet (from my Windows 98)
>station wouldn't you expect the root account to work?
>Each time I try this connection with the root account it won't connect
>(states my login is incorrect).  Any ideas?  I can most definitely login
>directly to the system using the root account.........Problem with telnet?

For obvious security reasons, telnetting to the root account is
disabled.  Just telnet to a non-root user and su.

Regards
Steve



 
 
 

Telnet question

Post by David Z. Maz » Thu, 18 Mar 1999 04:00:00


tm> If I'm trying to connect to my Linux box via Telnet (from my
tm> Windows 98) station wouldn't you expect the root account to work?

Well, no, not particularly.  I would expect the user account you do
most of your work as to work, though.

If you *must* log in as root remotely and su just isn't good enough
for you, you should be able to trivially find a solution on DejaNews.

--

"Hey, Doug, do you mind if I push the Emergency Booth Self-Destruct Button?"
"Oh, sure, Dave, whatever...you _do_ know what that does, right?"

 
 
 

Telnet question

Post by John Wolansk » Fri, 19 Mar 1999 04:00:00


Telnet won't let you telent in as root in Linux.

To get to root, you'd have to telent in as a regular user and then switch
to root, once you're logged in, thusly:

su - root

--
--John Wolanski
Remove the "_removethis_" from my email address to reply.



Quote:> If I'm trying to connect to my Linux box via Telnet (from my Windows 98)
> station wouldn't you expect the root account to work?
> Each time I try this connection with the root account it won't connect
> (states my login is incorrect).  Any ideas?  I can most definitely login
> directly to the system using the root account.........Problem with
telnet?

 
 
 

Telnet question

Post by Jeff Sher » Fri, 19 Mar 1999 04:00:00



> If I'm trying to connect to my Linux box via Telnet (from my Windows 98)
> station wouldn't you expect the root account to work?
> Each time I try this connection with the root account it won't connect
> (states my login is incorrect).  Any ideas?  I can most definitely login
> directly to the system using the root account.........Problem with telnet?

as the three people prior to me said, it's a bad bad idea
but if you REALLY want to rename the /etc/securetty file to something else (or
erase it if you really want) and then you can... but isn't su so much nicer? :)
 
 
 

Telnet question

Post by James Youngma » Fri, 19 Mar 1999 04:00:00



> If I'm trying to connect to my Linux box via Telnet (from my Windows 98)
> station wouldn't you expect the root account to work?

No; log in as your real username, and then become
root by using "su -".

It's for your own protection.

--

 
 
 

Telnet question

Post by fernand » Sat, 20 Mar 1999 04:00:00


It is a security issue.
I use to login as a normal user an then "su".
But if you really want to allow root telnet, then remove /etc/securetty


> If I'm trying to connect to my Linux box via Telnet (from my Windows 98)
> station wouldn't you expect the root account to work?
> Each time I try this connection with the root account it won't connect
> (states my login is incorrect).  Any ideas?  I can most definitely login
> directly to the system using the root account.........Problem with telnet?

--
--------------------------------------------
This are my personal opinions
Real email: sanabriaf at yahoo dot com
 
 
 

Telnet question

Post by GoGonzag » Sat, 20 Mar 1999 04:00:00


I think logging in as someone else and then becoming a superuser is a waste
of time when you're the administrator of the system.
I looked at the securetty file and I see tty1-tty8.  What's the significance
of these entries?


>It is a security issue.
>I use to login as a normal user an then "su".
>But if you really want to allow root telnet, then remove /etc/securetty


>> If I'm trying to connect to my Linux box via Telnet (from my Windows 98)
>> station wouldn't you expect the root account to work?
>> Each time I try this connection with the root account it won't connect
>> (states my login is incorrect).  Any ideas?  I can most definitely login
>> directly to the system using the root account.........Problem with
telnet?

>--
>--------------------------------------------
>This are my personal opinions
>Real email: sanabriaf at yahoo dot com

 
 
 

Telnet question

Post by Mark Swop » Sat, 20 Mar 1999 04:00:00


If I remember, the ttys listed are those that allow root login.
Mine include ttyp0, 1, & 2  and I can login as root via telnet.
I think that man securetty will tell you more.

mas


>I think logging in as someone else and then becoming a superuser is a waste
>of time when you're the administrator of the system.
>I looked at the securetty file and I see tty1-tty8.  What's the
significance
>of these entries?


>>It is a security issue.
>>I use to login as a normal user an then "su".
>>But if you really want to allow root telnet, then remove /etc/securetty


>>> If I'm trying to connect to my Linux box via Telnet (from my Windows 98)
>>> station wouldn't you expect the root account to work?
>>> Each time I try this connection with the root account it won't connect
>>> (states my login is incorrect).  Any ideas?  I can most definitely login
>>> directly to the system using the root account.........Problem with
>telnet?

>>--
>>--------------------------------------------
>>This are my personal opinions
>>Real email: sanabriaf at yahoo dot com

 
 
 

Telnet question

Post by Dan Nguye » Sat, 20 Mar 1999 04:00:00


: I think logging in as someone else and then becoming a superuser is a waste
: of time when you're the administrator of the system.
: I looked at the securetty file and I see tty1-tty8.  What's the significance
: of these entries?
It's not a waste of time.  As a sysadmin, the trouble to su to root
saves on the trouble of a possible hacker attack.

tty1-tty8 are your virtual consoles.  This asumes that anyone who is
sitting at your computer should be able to login as root.

If you must login as root, occasionally this is true I suggest
installing ssh.  Ssh is not subject to securetty since all connects go
through encrypted logins.

:>It is a security issue.
:>I use to login as a normal user an then "su".
:>But if you really want to allow root telnet, then remove /etc/securetty
:>
:>>
:>> If I'm trying to connect to my Linux box via Telnet (from my Windows 98)
:>> station wouldn't you expect the root account to work?
:>> Each time I try this connection with the root account it won't connect
:>> (states my login is incorrect).  Any ideas?  I can most definitely login
:>> directly to the system using the root account.........Problem with
: telnet?
:>
:>--
:>--------------------------------------------
:>This are my personal opinions
:>Real email: sanabriaf at yahoo dot com

--
           Dan Nguyen            | It is with true love as it is with ghosts;

http://www.cse.msu.edu/~nguyend7 |                    -La Rochefocauld, Maxims

 
 
 

Telnet question

Post by Chris J/ » Mon, 22 Mar 1999 04:00:00


If you trust the security of the network your computer is connected to, then
root logins via telnet are fine. If you have any doubt, then don't allow
root logins...rationale being that anyone on the network with a packet
sniffer will be able to see you log in to your machine as watch your plaintext
root password...so they then write it down, wait till you disapear, then
log in to your machine as root.

Although that said, anyone with a packet sniffer could see you su, then
grab the root password. General opinion: only be root if you can secure
your remote connection (eg: ssh) or you have a direct physical connection
with the machine (console or terminal).

tty1 to tty8 are assumed to be directly connected terminals, or virtual
consoles. In Linux, tty1 to tty8 are the VC's. In other UNIX'es they'd
be other serially connected terminals (ie, they plug into a physical RS232
port on the back on the machine...think VT100 or Wyse terminals), hence
could be more secure. On many UNIX's, /etc/securetty just has 1 entry: console.

Chris...


>I think logging in as someone else and then becoming a superuser is a waste
>of time when you're the administrator of the system.
>I looked at the securetty file and I see tty1-tty8.  What's the significance
>of these entries?

--

   \ If not for me then do it for yourself  \ www.nccnet.co.uk/~sixie/   \
    \ If not for me then do it for the world \ pine.shu.ac.uk/~cjohnso0/  \
     \                   -- Stevie Nicks      \                            \
 
 
 

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Escape character is '^]'.

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