Using Linux to learn AIX - which version is best ?

Using Linux to learn AIX - which version is best ?

Post by Paul Lyn » Fri, 06 Dec 1996 04:00:00



This may sound like a stupid thing to ask, but here goes....

The company I work for uses AIX exclusively. I need to get some  Unix
experience (AIX in particular) so which version of Linux would be best
suited for this purpose.

Or is it the case that, like fine wines, they all taste the same and
only a real expert can tell the difference.

I have seen a book on sale which contains both Slackware and Redhat on
two CD-ROMs for under 50 ukp. Worth getting ?

TIA,

Paul *

 
 
 

Using Linux to learn AIX - which version is best ?

Post by Jochen Dieh » Fri, 06 Dec 1996 04:00:00



> This may sound like a stupid thing to ask, but here goes....

> The company I work for uses AIX exclusively. I need to get some  Unix
> experience (AIX in particular) so which version of Linux would be best
> suited for this purpose.

> Or is it the case that, like fine wines, they all taste the same and
> only a real expert can tell the difference.

there is definitely a great difference between AIX and Linux. The main
point s (as they come straight in my mind):
1. SMIT
2. LVM
3. Easy to use and administer.
4. ...

So, if you need practise in *AIX* let your company buy you a 250 with
AIX and learn it. If you need practice in Unix in general (what is cpio
-dmpv anyway?), you can use Linux as well.

Jochen

 
 
 

Using Linux to learn AIX - which version is best ?

Post by Paul Mor » Fri, 06 Dec 1996 04:00:00



> The company I work for uses AIX exclusively. I need to get some  Unix
> experience (AIX in particular) so which version of Linux would be best
> suited for this purpose.

> Or is it the case that, like fine wines, they all taste the same and
> only a real expert can tell the difference.

Hello.

There are LOTS of differences between AIX and Linux. AIX has a system
managament menu system called SMIT through which you can do most of
the normal sysadmin type activities via menus. It keeps track of
software programs and patches installed and the device configuration
in an object oriented database. It also uses journaled file systems,
which is another topic all in itself.

But, if you want to get your hands dirty in basic "Unix" type commands,
Linux is great. I started using Linux back in university, and now
use AIX intensly, and can say that my Linux experiences, especially
with X11, helped me greatly in learning AIX.

A good book to get is the O'Reilly "Essential System Administration"
book. It covers both AIX and Linux system admin topics.

pm

--

--
Paul Mora

 
 
 

Using Linux to learn AIX - which version is best ?

Post by Cliff Pra » Sat, 07 Dec 1996 04:00:00




>Or is it the case that, like fine wines, they all taste the same and
>only a real expert can tell the difference.

>I have seen a book on sale which contains both Slackware and Redhat on
>two CD-ROMs for under 50 ukp. Worth getting ?

All Linuxes are pretty much the same. All unixes are pretty much the same,
but less so. AIX is probably (what I've seen of it) a little less standard
than most. All Unixes are tending to be the same (posix compliant). Any
Linux would probably do to learn Unix. (The differences tend to be minor
except in the area of System Admin where proprietary shells seem to be the
rule - no big deal though.

50 uk pounds is probably a little steep, but not excessive. But then again,
I've lost track of the prices of books in the UK....8-)

Cliff

 
 
 

Using Linux to learn AIX - which version is best ?

Post by Terry Glied » Sat, 07 Dec 1996 04:00:00



> The company I work for uses AIX exclusively. I need to get some  Unix
> experience (AIX in particular) so which version of Linux would be best
> suited for this purpose.

If your goal is just to learn "unix", then Linux will serve you
just fine. AIX supports most everything BSDish and System V-ish.
E.g. ps aux or ps -af will both work. This is true with most anything
I can think of.

A BIG difference is in administration. AIX seldom uses the conventional
flat files you will find on BSD-like systems. But if your goal is
to learn Shell programming, how to use filters, vi etc. Linux will
serve you well.
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