Kppp and wvdial

Kppp and wvdial

Post by John Marti » Tue, 11 Jan 2000 04:00:00



I have installed SuSe 6.1 Linux, and the KDE desktop.

I ran "yast" from the console to configure the modem, and then ran Kppp
from the desktop to configure the ISP connection.

However when I try to "connect" using Kppp, i receive: (1) modem ready and
(2) sorry, modem does not respond.

I then ran wvdialconf as directed in the SuSE manual, but the response was
that no modem was detected.

I have two hard drives which can be exchanged using a rack-cartridge
system.  Windows 98 is installed on one drive and Linux on the other.  When
I use Windows 98, the modem is connected to com port 2, and using Netscape
4.5, I can connect to my ISP. So the modem appears to be functiona.

Advice and suggestions will be appreciated.

--
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http://www.help.com/

 
 
 

Kppp and wvdial

Post by Silviu Minu » Tue, 11 Jan 2000 04:00:00


ln -s /dev/ttyS1 /dev/modem
setserial -a /dev/modem                  and see what IRQ and IO address is
Linux trying to use with the modem

Boot W98 and go to Device Manager->properties and see the resources of the
modem. Mine for instance uses irq 11 while Linux is by default hoping for irq
4.

Suppose you see irq 11 in W98. Then in Linux

setserial /dev/modem irq 11

Similarly if you want to modify other settings. Note that IRQs and stuff are a
hardware thing, and they are normally assigned by the BIOS (or with jumpers).
With setserial you're telling Linux what these resources are.


> I have installed SuSe 6.1 Linux, and the KDE desktop.

> I ran "yast" from the console to configure the modem, and then ran Kppp
> from the desktop to configure the ISP connection.

> However when I try to "connect" using Kppp, i receive: (1) modem ready and
> (2) sorry, modem does not respond.

> I then ran wvdialconf as directed in the SuSE manual, but the response was
> that no modem was detected.

> I have two hard drives which can be exchanged using a rack-cartridge
> system.  Windows 98 is installed on one drive and Linux on the other.  When
> I use Windows 98, the modem is connected to com port 2, and using Netscape
> 4.5, I can connect to my ISP. So the modem appears to be functiona.

> Advice and suggestions will be appreciated.

> --
> Posted via CNET Help.com
> http://www.help.com/


 
 
 

Kppp and wvdial

Post by Peter T. Breue » Tue, 11 Jan 2000 04:00:00


: I have installed SuSe 6.1 Linux, and the KDE desktop.

: I ran "yast" from the console to configure the modem, and then ran Kppp

Eh?  How can you do a good job with yast?  At best you can point the
softlinks at the right places.  But configure the kernel interrupt?  Set
the mobo ioport?

: However when I try to "connect" using Kppp, i receive: (1) modem ready and
: (2) sorry, modem does not respond.

Sounds a lot like a winmodem. Dump it, Or provide more details. In any
case read the serial howto and the modem howto and do as they say.

: I then ran wvdialconf as directed in the SuSE manual, but the response was
: that no modem was detected.

Apparently a winmodem. I kind of deduce that this is an internal winmodem on
the pci bus, but since you didn't say anything, it could be anything. If
it's not a winmodem you have excelent prospects. If it is a winmodem, your
chances are very slim.

Peter

 
 
 

Kppp and wvdial

Post by John Marti » Wed, 12 Jan 2000 04:00:00


Hi Peter,

Thank you for replying to my call for help.  I realize when I reread my
message that I did not include any details about my modem.  Sorry.  The
modem is a U.S. Robotics 56K Faxmodem. I understand that this is not a
Winmodem but I could be wrong.  The SuSE web site shows that my modem is
supported by my distribution.

???????

Thanks again for your reply.



> : I have installed SuSe 6.1 Linux, and the KDE desktop.

> : I ran "yast" from the console to configure the modem, and then ran Kppp

> Eh?  How can you do a good job with yast?  At best you can point the
> softlinks at the right places.  But configure the kernel interrupt?  Set
> the mobo ioport?

> : However when I try to "connect" using Kppp, i receive: (1) modem ready
and
> : (2) sorry, modem does not respond.

> Sounds a lot like a winmodem. Dump it, Or provide more details. In any
> case read the serial howto and the modem howto and do as they say.

> : I then ran wvdialconf as directed in the SuSE manual, but the response
was
> : that no modem was detected.

> Apparently a winmodem. I kind of deduce that this is an internal winmodem
on
> the pci bus, but since you didn't say anything, it could be anything. If
> it's not a winmodem you have excelent prospects. If it is a winmodem,
your
> chances are very slim.

> Peter

--
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Kppp and wvdial

Post by John Marti » Wed, 12 Jan 2000 04:00:00


Hi,

Thank you for your response to my cry for help.

Win98-Device Manager-Properties shows:

     Interrupt request = 3 and input/output range = 02F8-02FF.

After booting Linux and logging in as root, I typed

     ln -s /dev/ttyS1 /dev/modem

and received following response:

     ln: /dev/modem: file exists

I typed:

     setserial -a /dev/modem

and received following response:

     /dev/modem, line 1, UART:16550A, Port: 0x02f8
     Baud_base: 115200, close_delay:50, divisor: 0
     closing_wait: 3000, closing_wait2: infinite
     Flags: spd_normal skip_test

Appears that both Win98 and Linux are using the same IRQ--3.

Will appreciate hearing further from you.

Thanks again.


> ln -s /dev/ttyS1 /dev/modem
> setserial -a /dev/modem                  and see what IRQ and IO address
is
> Linux trying to use with the modem

> Boot W98 and go to Device Manager->properties and see the resources of
the
> modem. Mine for instance uses irq 11 while Linux is by default hoping for
irq
> 4.

> Suppose you see irq 11 in W98. Then in Linux

> setserial /dev/modem irq 11

> Similarly if you want to modify other settings. Note that IRQs and stuff
are a
> hardware thing, and they are normally assigned by the BIOS (or with
jumpers).
> With setserial you're telling Linux what these resources are.


> > I have installed SuSe 6.1 Linux, and the KDE desktop.

> > I ran "yast" from the console to configure the modem, and then ran Kppp
> > from the desktop to configure the ISP connection.

> > However when I try to "connect" using Kppp, i receive: (1) modem ready
and
> > (2) sorry, modem does not respond.

> > I then ran wvdialconf as directed in the SuSE manual, but the response
was
> > that no modem was detected.

> > I have two hard drives which can be exchanged using a rack-cartridge
> > system.  Windows 98 is installed on one drive and Linux on the other.  
When
> > I use Windows 98, the modem is connected to com port 2, and using
Netscape
> > 4.5, I can connect to my ISP. So the modem appears to be functiona.

> > Advice and suggestions will be appreciated.

> > --
> > Posted via CNET Help.com
> > http://www.help.com/

--
Posted via CNET Help.com
http://www.help.com/
 
 
 

Kppp and wvdial

Post by Peter T. Breue » Wed, 12 Jan 2000 04:00:00


: Thank you for replying to my call for help.  I realize when I reread my
: message that I did not include any details about my modem.  Sorry.  The
: modem is a U.S. Robotics 56K Faxmodem. I understand that this is not a

Internal? External? Model number?

: Winmodem but I could be wrong.  The SuSE web site shows that my modem is
: supported by my distribution.

If it's internal, then I'm afraid that it is either a winmodem or it is
not. USR internals come in both flavours. Look up the model number on
the linux winmodems page.

  http://www.o2.net/~gromitkc/winmodem.html

Peter

 
 
 

Kppp and wvdial

Post by John Marti » Wed, 12 Jan 2000 04:00:00


Hi Peter,

Thank you for your assistance and patience.

I dug up the invoice for my computer purchase and learned that my modem is
a U.S. Robotics 5687 v.90 Int. 56K OEM modem.

I visited the web site you mentioned and this modem was listed as
compatible with Linux, but with a caveat about a 5687-002 model.  So I
called the shop that assembled the computer, and was assured by a tech
there that my modem is not a Winmodem.  

Is there anything else I can do or should I just consider purchasing a
different modem?

Thanks again.  Your assistance is appreciated.



> : Thank you for replying to my call for help.  I realize when I reread my
> : message that I did not include any details about my modem.  Sorry.  The
> : modem is a U.S. Robotics 56K Faxmodem. I understand that this is not a

> Internal? External? Model number?

> : Winmodem but I could be wrong.  The SuSE web site shows that my modem
is
> : supported by my distribution.

> If it's internal, then I'm afraid that it is either a winmodem or it is
> not. USR internals come in both flavours. Look up the model number on
> the linux winmodems page.

>   http://www.o2.net/~gromitkc/winmodem.html

> Peter

--
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http://www.help.com/
 
 
 

Kppp and wvdial

Post by Peter T. Breue » Wed, 12 Jan 2000 04:00:00


: I dug up the invoice for my computer purchase and learned that my modem is
: a U.S. Robotics 5687 v.90 Int. 56K OEM modem.

You need more info than that. Look at the modem and take down its
model number.

: I visited the web site you mentioned and this modem was listed as
: compatible with Linux, but with a caveat about a 5687-002 model.  So I
: called the shop that assembled the computer, and was assured by a tech

Call him back and tell him that you assure him that it is and see what
happens! What does his assurance count for? He won't know. Just check
the model number, and then you WILL know.

: there that my modem is not a Winmodem.  

: Is there anything else I can do or should I just consider purchasing a
: different modem?

Whyever?  Just check the model number and look it up.  If it's not a
winmodem, then do what the Modem and PnP HOWTOs tell you to do with it.
You should be fine.

Peter

 
 
 

Kppp and wvdial

Post by Akira Yamanit » Thu, 13 Jan 2000 04:00:00




> : Thank you for replying to my call for help.  I realize when I reread my
> : message that I did not include any details about my modem.  Sorry.  The
> : modem is a U.S. Robotics 56K Faxmodem. I understand that this is not a

> Internal? External? Model number?

> : Winmodem but I could be wrong.  The SuSE web site shows that my modem is
> : supported by my distribution.

> If it's internal, then I'm afraid that it is either a winmodem or it is
> not. USR internals come in both flavours. Look up the model number on
> the linux winmodems page.

>   http://www.o2.net/~gromitkc/winmodem.html

> Peter

If Windows is using a typical serial io base port, it's not a
WinModem. I believe all WinModems will also report a used memory
range (and DMA channel if I'm not mistaken).
 
 
 

Kppp and wvdial

Post by Silviu Minu » Thu, 13 Jan 2000 04:00:00


Post _verbatim_ the output of

ls -l /dev/modem
setserial -a /dev/modem

How exactly does the modem behave? Can you run minicom? Is IRQ 3 being used by
something else? Look for IRQ conflicts in Win98. You can also look in /proc
(devices, ioports, interrupts, pci). Are you sure it's com2, irq 3?


> Hi,

> Thank you for your response to my cry for help.

> Win98-Device Manager-Properties shows:

>      Interrupt request = 3 and input/output range = 02F8-02FF.

> After booting Linux and logging in as root, I typed

>      ln -s /dev/ttyS1 /dev/modem

> and received following response:

>      ln: /dev/modem: file exists

> I typed:

>      setserial -a /dev/modem

> and received following response:

>      /dev/modem, line 1, UART:16550A, Port: 0x02f8
>      Baud_base: 115200, close_delay:50, divisor: 0
>      closing_wait: 3000, closing_wait2: infinite
>      Flags: spd_normal skip_test

> Appears that both Win98 and Linux are using the same IRQ--3.

> Will appreciate hearing further from you.

> Thanks again.


> > ln -s /dev/ttyS1 /dev/modem
> > setserial -a /dev/modem                  and see what IRQ and IO address
> is
> > Linux trying to use with the modem

> > Boot W98 and go to Device Manager->properties and see the resources of
> the
> > modem. Mine for instance uses irq 11 while Linux is by default hoping for
> irq
> > 4.

> > Suppose you see irq 11 in W98. Then in Linux

> > setserial /dev/modem irq 11

> > Similarly if you want to modify other settings. Note that IRQs and stuff
> are a
> > hardware thing, and they are normally assigned by the BIOS (or with
> jumpers).
> > With setserial you're telling Linux what these resources are.


> > > I have installed SuSe 6.1 Linux, and the KDE desktop.

> > > I ran "yast" from the console to configure the modem, and then ran Kppp
> > > from the desktop to configure the ISP connection.

> > > However when I try to "connect" using Kppp, i receive: (1) modem ready
> and
> > > (2) sorry, modem does not respond.

> > > I then ran wvdialconf as directed in the SuSE manual, but the response
> was
> > > that no modem was detected.

> > > I have two hard drives which can be exchanged using a rack-cartridge
> > > system.  Windows 98 is installed on one drive and Linux on the other.
> When
> > > I use Windows 98, the modem is connected to com port 2, and using
> Netscape
> > > 4.5, I can connect to my ISP. So the modem appears to be functiona.

> > > Advice and suggestions will be appreciated.

> > > --
> > > Posted via CNET Help.com
> > > http://www.help.com/

> --
> Posted via CNET Help.com
> http://www.help.com/

 
 
 

Kppp and wvdial

Post by Silviu Minu » Thu, 13 Jan 2000 04:00:00


Oh, and by the way, you can take a look at

http://www.o2.net/~gromitkc/winmodem.html

 
 
 

Kppp and wvdial

Post by Silviu Minu » Thu, 13 Jan 2000 04:00:00



> Hi,

> Following is what I have in aswer to your questions.

> 1.  typed     ls -1 /dev/modem
>     response  /dev/modem

There it is, right there! The response should be
lrwxrwxrwx   1 root     root           10 Jul 26 01:03 /dev/modem ->
/dev/ttyS1

You don't have the link /dev/modem to /dev/ttyS1

ln -s /dev/ttyS1 /dev/modem

Quote:> 2.  typed     setserial -a /dev/modem
>     response  /dev/modem,Line 1,UART:16550A,Port:0x02f8,IRQ:3
>                    Baud_base:115200,close_delay:50,divisor:0
>                    closing_wait:3000,closing_wait2:infinite
>                    Flags:spd-normal skip-test

If /dev/modem is a dangling link I don't see how you get this from setserial.
Anyways, check /dev/modem as above
If /dev/modem is pointing to nothing and all software is using /dev/modem, no
wonder you get no response at all from

Quote:

> 8.   question:  Are you sure it's com2, irq 3?
>      answer:    No I'm not sure, but see contents of included files.

> Thanks for your patience.  I looking at a lot of trees now, but I still
> haven't seen the forest.

You see these things in Win98. Rightclick on My Computer -> Properties
->Device Manager -> Modem -> Resources. Also in Device Manager, rightclick on
the very top item (I forget what it is, maybe System, or Computer).
This will show all IRQs.

If /dev/modem is not the problem, go to BIOS (press delete while booting) and
tell the BIOS that you have a PNP system. Then the BIOS should only assign a
minimal set of resources, not including the modem. Then in Linux you should be
able to assign resources with isapnp if the modem is isapnp, or with the
pcitools (lspci, setpci) if it's pci.


> > Post _verbatim_ the output of

> > ls -l /dev/modem
> > setserial -a /dev/modem

> > How exactly does the modem behave? Can you run minicom? Is IRQ 3 being
> used by
> > something else? Look for IRQ conflicts in Win98. You can also look in
> /proc
> > (devices, ioports, interrupts, pci). Are you sure it's com2, irq 3?

> > > Hi,

> > > Thank you for your response to my cry for help.

> > > Win98-Device Manager-Properties shows:

> > >      Interrupt request = 3 and input/output range = 02F8-02FF.

> > > After booting Linux and logging in as root, I typed

> > >      ln -s /dev/ttyS1 /dev/modem

> > > and received following response:

> > >      ln: /dev/modem: file exists

> > > I typed:

> > >      setserial -a /dev/modem

> > > and received following response:

> > >      /dev/modem, line 1, UART:16550A, Port: 0x02f8
> > >      Baud_base: 115200, close_delay:50, divisor: 0
> > >      closing_wait: 3000, closing_wait2: infinite
> > >      Flags: spd_normal skip_test

> > > Appears that both Win98 and Linux are using the same IRQ--3.

> > > Will appreciate hearing further from you.

> > > Thanks again.


> > > > ln -s /dev/ttyS1 /dev/modem
> > > > setserial -a /dev/modem                  and see what IRQ and IO
> address
> > > is
> > > > Linux trying to use with the modem

> > > > Boot W98 and go to Device Manager->properties and see the resources
> of
> > > the
> > > > modem. Mine for instance uses irq 11 while Linux is by default hoping
> for
> > > irq
> > > > 4.

> > > > Suppose you see irq 11 in W98. Then in Linux

> > > > setserial /dev/modem irq 11

> > > > Similarly if you want to modify other settings. Note that IRQs and
> stuff
> > > are a
> > > > hardware thing, and they are normally assigned by the BIOS (or with
> > > jumpers).
> > > > With setserial you're telling Linux what these resources are.


> > > > > I have installed SuSe 6.1 Linux, and the KDE desktop.

> > > > > I ran "yast" from the console to configure the modem, and then ran
> Kppp
> > > > > from the desktop to configure the ISP connection.

> > > > > However when I try to "connect" using Kppp, i receive: (1) modem
> ready
> > > and
> > > > > (2) sorry, modem does not respond.

> > > > > I then ran wvdialconf as directed in the SuSE manual, but the
> response
> > > was
> > > > > that no modem was detected.

> > > > > I have two hard drives which can be exchanged using a
> rack-cartridge
> > > > > system.  Windows 98 is installed on one drive and Linux on the
> other.
> > > When
> > > > > I use Windows 98, the modem is connected to com port 2, and using
> > > Netscape
> > > > > 4.5, I can connect to my ISP. So the modem appears to be functiona.

> > > > > Advice and suggestions will be appreciated.

> > > > > --
> > > > > Posted via CNET Help.com
> > > > > http://www.help.com/

> > > --
> > > Posted via CNET Help.com
> > > http://www.help.com/

> --
> Posted via CNET Help.com
> http://www.help.com/

 
 
 

Kppp and wvdial

Post by John Marti » Fri, 14 Jan 2000 04:00:00


Hi,

Following is what I have in aswer to your questions.

1.  typed     ls -1 /dev/modem
    response  /dev/modem

2.  typed     setserial -a /dev/modem
    response  /dev/modem,Line 1,UART:16550A,Port:0x02f8,IRQ:3
                   Baud_base:115200,close_delay:50,divisor:0
                   closing_wait:3000,closing_wait2:infinite
                   Flags:spd-normal skip-test

3.  question:  How does the modem behave?
    answer:    Works Ok in WIN98,  no response at all in Linux.

4.  question:  Can you run minicom?
    answer:    I can run Minicom from the KDE desktop.  When I maximize the
               screen, the lowest row shows the modem to be "offline". I
               could configure by typing ALT-O, selecting serial port
               setup, entering /dev/modem, and saving file as dfl.  I was
               also able to set ECHO to ON, and initialize modem, but it
               remained offline.It would not respond to ATDT.

5.  question:  Is IRQ 3 being used by something else?
    answer:    /proc/interrupts shows IRQ 3 assigned to "serial"

6.  question:  IRQ conflicts in WIN98?
    answer:    none that I could find

7.  question:  Contents of /proc/(devices,ioports,interrupts,pci)?
    answer: (a)/proc/devices

                Character devices
                   1   mem
                   2   pty
                   3   ttyp
                   4   ttyS
                   5   cua
                   7   vcs
                  10   misc
                  36   netlink
                 128   ptm
                 136   pts

                Block devices
                   1   ramdisk
                   2   fd
                   3   ide0
                   9   md
                  22   ide1
           (b)/proc/ioports

               02f8-02ff  :  serial(auto)
               03f8-03ff  :  serial(auto)
               remaing 16 lines omitted

            (c)/proc/interrupts
                  CPU0
               0:  501198     XT-PIC     timer
               1:    3537     XT-PIC     keyboard
               2:       0     XT-PIC     cascade
               3:       0     XT-PIC     serial
               8:       2     XT-PIC     rtc
              12:   45577     XT-PIC     PS/2 Mouse
              13:       1     XT-PIC     fpu
              14:  471847     XT-PIC     ide0
              15:       8     XT-PIC     ide1
             NMI:       0

            (d)/proc/pci

                pci devices found:
                  Bus  0, device   0,   function   0:
                    Host bridge: Intel 440BX - 82443BX Host (rev 2)
                      Medium devsel. Master Capable. Latency=64
                      Prefetchable 32 bit memory at 0xe4000000 [0xe4000008]
                  Bus 0, device 1, function 0
                    PCI bridge: Intel 440BX - 82443BX AGP (rev2)
                      Medium devsel. Master Capable. Latency=64 Min Gnt=136
                  Bus 0, device 4, function 0:
                    ISA bridge: Intel 82371AB PIIX4 ISA (rev2).
                      Medium devsel. Fast back-to-back-capable. Master    
                  Capable No bursts.
                  Bus 0, device 4, function 1:
                    IDE interface: Intel 82371AB PIIX4 IDE (rev 1).
                      Medium devsel Fast back-to-back capable. Master      
                      Capable Latency=32
                      I/O at 0xd800 [0xd801]
                  Bus 0, device 4, function 2:
                    USB Controller: Intel 82371AB PIIX4 USB (rev 1).
                      Medium devsel. Fast back-to-back capable. IRQ 10.    
                      Master Capable. Latency=32.
                      I/O at 0xd400 [0xd401].
                  Bus 0, device 4, function 3:
                    Bridge: Intel 82371AB PIIX4 ACPI (rev 2).
                      Medium devsel. Fast back-to-back capable
                  Bus 1, device 0, function 0:
                    VGA compatible controller: Intel Unknown device (rev  
                    33).
                      Vendor id=8086. Device id=7800.
                      Medium devsel. Fast back-to-back capable. IRQ 11.    
                      Master Capable. No bursts.
                      Prefetchable 32 bit memory at 0xe3000000 [0xe3000008]
                      Non-prefetchable 32 bit memory at 0xe2000000        
                      [0xe2000000].

8.   question:  Are you sure it's com2, irq 3?
     answer:    No I'm not sure, but see contents of included files.

Thanks for your patience.  I looking at a lot of trees now, but I still
haven't seen the forest.

Silviu Minut wrote:

> Post _verbatim_ the output of

> ls -l /dev/modem
> setserial -a /dev/modem

> How exactly does the modem behave? Can you run minicom? Is IRQ 3 being
used by
> something else? Look for IRQ conflicts in Win98. You can also look in
/proc
> (devices, ioports, interrupts, pci). Are you sure it's com2, irq 3?
> John Martin wrote:

> > Hi,

> > Thank you for your response to my cry for help.

> > Win98-Device Manager-Properties shows:

> >      Interrupt request = 3 and input/output range = 02F8-02FF.

> > After booting Linux and logging in as root, I typed

> >      ln -s /dev/ttyS1 /dev/modem

> > and received following response:

> >      ln: /dev/modem: file exists

> > I typed:

> >      setserial -a /dev/modem

> > and received following response:

> >      /dev/modem, line 1, UART:16550A, Port: 0x02f8
> >      Baud_base: 115200, close_delay:50, divisor: 0
> >      closing_wait: 3000, closing_wait2: infinite
> >      Flags: spd_normal skip_test

> > Appears that both Win98 and Linux are using the same IRQ--3.

> > Will appreciate hearing further from you.

> > Thanks again.

> > SIlviu Minut wrote:

> > > ln -s /dev/ttyS1 /dev/modem
> > > setserial -a /dev/modem                  and see what IRQ and IO
address
> > is
> > > Linux trying to use with the modem

> > > Boot W98 and go to Device Manager->properties and see the resources
of
> > the
> > > modem. Mine for instance uses irq 11 while Linux is by default hoping
for
> > irq
> > > 4.

> > > Suppose you see irq 11 in W98. Then in Linux

> > > setserial /dev/modem irq 11

> > > Similarly if you want to modify other settings. Note that IRQs and
stuff
> > are a
> > > hardware thing, and they are normally assigned by the BIOS (or with
> > jumpers).
> > > With setserial you're telling Linux what these resources are.

> > > John Martin wrote:

> > > > I have installed SuSe 6.1 Linux, and the KDE desktop.

> > > > I ran "yast" from the console to configure the modem, and then ran
Kppp
> > > > from the desktop to configure the ISP connection.

> > > > However when I try to "connect" using Kppp, i receive: (1) modem
ready
> > and
> > > > (2) sorry, modem does not respond.

> > > > I then ran wvdialconf as directed in the SuSE manual, but the
response
> > was
> > > > that no modem was detected.

> > > > I have two hard drives which can be exchanged using a
rack-cartridge
> > > > system.  Windows 98 is installed on one drive and Linux on the
other.
> > When
> > > > I use Windows 98, the modem is connected to com port 2, and using
> > Netscape
> > > > 4.5, I can connect to my ISP. So the modem appears to be functiona.

> > > > Advice and suggestions will be appreciated.

> > > > --
> > > > Posted via CNET Help.com
> > > > http://www.help.com/

> > --
> > Posted via CNET Help.com
> > http://www.help.com/

--
Posted via CNET Help.com
http://www.help.com/
 
 
 

Kppp and wvdial

Post by Bob Hau » Fri, 14 Jan 2000 04:00:00



>1.  typed     ls -1 /dev/modem
>    response  /dev/modem

That should be "ls -l", dash-lower-case-L, not dash-lower-case-number-one.

Quote:>2.  typed     setserial -a /dev/modem
>    response  /dev/modem,Line 1,UART:16550A,Port:0x02f8,IRQ:3
>                   Baud_base:115200,close_delay:50,divisor:0
>                   closing_wait:3000,closing_wait2:infinite
>                   Flags:spd-normal skip-test

So this would be COM2 in Windows.

Quote:>8.   question:  Are you sure it's com2, irq 3?
>     answer:    No I'm not sure, but see contents of included files.

Is this an internal or external modem?

--
 -| Bob Hauck
 -| Wasatch Communications Group
 -| http://www.wasatch.com/~bobh

 
 
 

Kppp and wvdial

Post by John Marti » Sat, 15 Jan 2000 04:00:00


Hi,

Just a few minutes ago, I received the following from 3Com Online Support:

"The 5687 line of U.S. Sportster modems are not winmodems. They are
hardware based modems."

?????



> : I dug up the invoice for my computer purchase and learned that my modem
is
> : a U.S. Robotics 5687 v.90 Int. 56K OEM modem.

> You need more info than that. Look at the modem and take down its
> model number.

> : I visited the web site you mentioned and this modem was listed as
> : compatible with Linux, but with a caveat about a 5687-002 model.  So I
> : called the shop that assembled the computer, and was assured by a tech

> Call him back and tell him that you assure him that it is and see what
> happens! What does his assurance count for? He won't know. Just check
> the model number, and then you WILL know.

> : there that my modem is not a Winmodem.  

> : Is there anything else I can do or should I just consider purchasing a
> : different modem?

> Whyever?  Just check the model number and look it up.  If it's not a
> winmodem, then do what the Modem and PnP HOWTOs tell you to do with it.
> You should be fine.

> Peter

--
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http://www.help.com/
 
 
 

1. wvdial works, kppp doesn't !

Hi,

I am having trouble with kppp under SuSE 6.2. My system is as follows.

Celeron 333
Gigabyte GA-6BXE motherboard
voodoo 3 2000 AGP graphics card
linux installed on hda with win98 on hdb
Topic 56k external modem on com1

Having installed linux, I tried to make a dial up connection. Using wvdial,
after setting
up my username, password, IP address etc... I had no trouble making a PPP
conection
with my service provider.

So far so good.

Then tried the same with kppp (1.16.10 I think, on KDE 1.1.1), but I always
end up with
the message 'NO CARRIER' before any number is dialled. Can anyone suggest
what could be
the problem. I haven't made any special changes to wither program.

Thanks

Chris

Remove 'nospam.' to reply

P.S. I can attempt to post my config files, but when I do, my modem hangs
(in win98 AND linux)!!

2. NFS Coruption?

3. wvdial and kppp flaw

4. Problems with gcc 2.5.8

5. Newbie wvdial & kppp questions

6. Netscape 3.01 Gold ???'s

7. kppp vs wvdial

8. Q on files.

9. Can't Open Display After KPPP (Fine with Wvdial)

10. Diald, kppp and wvdial

11. kppp - won't connect to my ISP, but wvdial will

12. wvdial works, kppp doesn't!

13. wvdial, PAP, pppd dies after wvdial connects