The "new" warez law and the "gnu" answer - Give me a BREAK!

The "new" warez law and the "gnu" answer - Give me a BREAK!

Post by Kevin P. Insco » Sun, 23 Nov 1997 04:00:00



Quote:> >If you only know how to use Linux or even UNIX, your employment
> >prospects are shrinking, and RAPIDLY.  While if you're an expert in
> >using, programming and administering NT4 and 95 you're on the start of
> >the growth curve.  I know, I earn my living as a computer consultant
> >(for over 20 years) and I was a PROMINENT X/Motif/OpenLook developer.
> >I've watched the number of openings for this technology steadily
> >shrink over the past 18 months and I see - and help - companies switch
> >over to NT for database servers and workstations EVERY DAY!

Ummm...hate to burst your bubble...but just about every survey
I have seen in the last 4 years has had Sun and AIX as the hot
skill sets recruiters are looking for...NT generally rates several
notches lower then unix. Why..because everybody wants to be a CNE
or MSCE or XYZ..or whatever. Meanwhile my unix skills keep me in
demand as I field (no joke) 2-10 calls a week from recruiters for my
*UNIX* skills...yes I have Microsoft...no they dont care..they
want unix...and boy are they willing to pay.

And I get paid to play with unix...what a country...

--
Kevin P. Inscoe  e-mail: kevin[dot]inscoe[at]cbis[dot]com
Cincinnati Bell Information Systems
Open Systems Group      Sun/Unix/AIX/Dec Sys. Admin.
Specialized Systems     (407) 771-5385
Lake Mary, FL           http://www.iag.net/~inscoe

 
 
 

The "new" warez law and the "gnu" answer - Give me a BREAK!

Post by Kevin P. Insco » Sun, 23 Nov 1997 04:00:00


Quote:> >If you only know how to use Linux or even UNIX, your employment
> >prospects are shrinking, and RAPIDLY.  While if you're an expert in
> >using, programming and administering NT4 and 95 you're on the start of
> >the growth curve.  I know, I earn my living as a computer consultant
> >(for over 20 years) and I was a PROMINENT X/Motif/OpenLook developer.
> >I've watched the number of openings for this technology steadily
> >shrink over the past 18 months and I see - and help - companies switch
> >over to NT for database servers and workstations EVERY DAY!

Ummm...hate to burst your bubble...but just about every survey
I have seen in the last 4 years has had Sun and AIX as the hot
skill sets recruiters are looking for...NT generally rates several
notches lower then unix. Why..because everybody wants to be a CNE
or MSCE or XYZ..or whatever. Meanwhile my unix skills keep me in
demand as I field (no joke) 2-10 calls a week from recruiters for my
*UNIX* skills...yes I have Microsoft...no they dont care..they
want unix...and boy are they willing to pay.

And I get paid to play with unix...what a country...

--
Kevin P. Inscoe  e-mail: kevin[dot]inscoe[at]cbis[dot]com
Cincinnati Bell Information Systems
Open Systems Group      Sun/Unix/AIX/Dec Sys. Admin.
Specialized Systems     (407) 771-5385
Lake Mary, FL           http://www.iag.net/~inscoe

 
 
 

The "new" warez law and the "gnu" answer - Give me a BREAK!

Post by Frank Sweetse » Sun, 23 Nov 1997 04:00:00



Quote:> Ummm...hate to burst your bubble...but just about every survey
> I have seen in the last 4 years has had Sun and AIX as the hot
> skill sets recruiters are looking for...NT generally rates several
> notches lower then unix. Why..because everybody wants to be a CNE
> or MSCE or XYZ..or whatever. Meanwhile my unix skills keep me in
> demand as I field (no joke) 2-10 calls a week from recruiters for my
> *UNIX* skills...yes I have Microsoft...no they dont care..they
> want unix...and boy are they willing to pay.

> And I get paid to play with unix...what a country...

That's one of my *favorite* aspects about linux.  it allows me to have full
root access to a unix machine on my desktop, that I can completely scew up
without having to worry about paying for anything if it breaks :)  Thanks
to my little linux machine, I've gotten experience upgrading system libs,
configuring sendmail, inetd, and dozens of other things that I never could
have touched without buying an outrageously expensive commercial unix
license.

--
Frank Sweetser rasmusin at wpi.edu fsweetser at blee.net | PGP key available
paramount.res.wpi.net RedHat 4.9.1 Linux 2.0.32   i586   | at public servers
"I'll carry your books, I'll carry a tune, I'll carry on, carry over,
carry forward, Cary Grant, cash & carry, Carry Me Back To Old *ia,
I'll even Hara Kari if you show me how, but I will *not* carry a gun."
                -- Hawkeye, M*A*S*H

 
 
 

The "new" warez law and the "gnu" answer - Give me a BREAK!

Post by Frank Sweetse » Sun, 23 Nov 1997 04:00:00




> : That's one of my *favorite* aspects about linux.  it allows me to have full
> : root access to a unix machine on my desktop, that I can completely scew up
> : without having to worry about paying for anything if it breaks :)  Thanks

> You might also want to try out SCO Unixware or Openserver, those two
> products can also give you root access for around 19 bucks.

true, these are alternatives, and I applaud them for making these offers.
however, I prefer linux because I get everything, full-featured, unlimited
user, unlimited license.

Quote:> : to my little linux machine, I've gotten experience upgrading system libs,
> : configuring sendmail, inetd, and dozens of other things that I never could

> It is only useful if you are planning to work as a system administrator,
> Good thing about being a system administrator is that there is no need to
> write a lot of programs, everyday is just about the same with all the
> routine jobs.  Pretty cool if you hate coding.

sounds like my kinda job :-)

--
Frank Sweetser rasmusin at wpi.edu fsweetser at blee.net | PGP key available
paramount.res.wpi.net RedHat 4.9.1 Linux 2.0.32   i586   | at public servers
Feel free to contact me (flames about my english and the useless of this
driver will be redirected to /dev/null, oh no, it's full...).
(Michael Beck, describing the PC-speaker sound device)

 
 
 

The "new" warez law and the "gnu" answer - Give me a BREAK!

Post by Dong L » Mon, 24 Nov 1997 04:00:00


: That's one of my *favorite* aspects about linux.  it allows me to have full
: root access to a unix machine on my desktop, that I can completely scew up
: without having to worry about paying for anything if it breaks :)  Thanks

You might also want to try out SCO Unixware or Openserver, those two
products can also give you root access for around 19 bucks.

: to my little linux machine, I've gotten experience upgrading system libs,
: configuring sendmail, inetd, and dozens of other things that I never could

It is only useful if you are planning to work as a system administrator,
Good thing about being a system administrator is that there is no need to
write a lot of programs, everyday is just about the same with all the
routine jobs.  Pretty cool if you hate coding.

-Dong
: have touched without buying an outrageously expensive commercial unix
: license.
:
: --
: Frank Sweetser rasmusin at wpi.edu fsweetser at blee.net | PGP key available
: paramount.res.wpi.net RedHat 4.9.1 Linux 2.0.32   i586   | at public servers
: "I'll carry your books, I'll carry a tune, I'll carry on, carry over,
: carry forward, Cary Grant, cash & carry, Carry Me Back To Old *ia,
: I'll even Hara Kari if you show me how, but I will *not* carry a gun."
:                 -- Hawkeye, M*A*S*H

 
 
 

The "new" warez law and the "gnu" answer - Give me a BREAK!

Post by Eric Lee Gre » Fri, 28 Nov 1997 04:00:00



Quote:>It is only useful if you are planning to work as a system administrator,
>Good thing about being a system administrator is that there is no need to
>write a lot of programs, everyday is just about the same with all the
>routine jobs.  Pretty cool if you hate coding.

Err, hate to bust your bubble, but Unix system administrators often do
a bit of coding. Most Unix installations have a large collection of
administrative scripts to automate various tasks (such as, e.g., adding
5,000 freshmen to your NIS database based on an export list from the
mainframe administrative system :-).

As far as I know NT has no such scripting capabilities. If you want to
automate administrative tasks with NT, err... well... hmm...

I double as system administrator for about 220 Unix servers and as a
database programmer. If we had 220 NT systems in the field there was
no way we could do it -- everything is highly automated via a ton of
scripts I wrote way back in the beginning. (No, I'm not the only
database programmer at Executive Consultants -- but I *AM* the only
competent system administrator for all those systems, although site
managers can do many tasks from the menus that I set up). Of course,
the biggest secret is standardization, standardization,
standardization... the first thing I did when I came into the company
was create an automated software distribution & installation system
that automatically kept all servers in the field "synched". I didn't
even have to buy any software to do it -- the Internet sites are
updated over the Internet, the modem-only sites are updated via
UUCP. To do the same with NT would require considerable cash
outlays...

--

   Linux & Educational Administration computer solutions