prn -> ps converters

prn -> ps converters

Post by Neil Zanell » Thu, 21 Feb 2002 08:33:23



Hello,

Does anyone know of any converters which will convert
the MS .prn file format to postscript? I would assume
that prn is converted to ps at some point when files
are printed on Windows computers. Too bad MS does not
have pipes to redirect printer output to a file.

Thanks,

Neil

 
 
 

prn -> ps converters

Post by Madhusudan Sing » Thu, 21 Feb 2002 09:44:28


On Tuesday 19 February 2002 18:33, Neil Zanella, purporting to be

Quote:

> Hello,

> Does anyone know of any converters which will convert
> the MS .prn file format to postscript? I would assume
> that prn is converted to ps at some point when files
> are printed on Windows computers. Too bad MS does not
> have pipes to redirect printer output to a file.

> Thanks,

> Neil

A .prn file is almost completely identical to a .ps file. M$ for obvious
reasons, names its files differently.

All you need to get rid of in a .prn file are the pesky ^M (use dos2unix)
characters and there are some comments in a .prn file at the very end
(compare with a .ps file and you will know). Remove them, and rename your
file.

 
 
 

prn -> ps converters

Post by Dances With Cro » Thu, 21 Feb 2002 09:56:10


On Tue, 19 Feb 2002 20:03:23 -0330, Neil Zanella staggered into the
Black Sun and said:

Quote:> Does anyone know of any converters which will convert the MS .prn file
> format to postscript?

If the selected printer in 'Doze is a PS printer, .PRN *is* PostScript.
Funny, that.  You can manually add a "generic PostScript printer" to the
list of system devices in some way if you don't have one, or at least
you could under NT.  I recall running into some weird problem while
trying to do that in 2K, but there's gotta be a way.

Quote:> I would assume that prn is converted to ps at some point when files
> are printed on Windows computers. Too bad MS does not have pipes to
> redirect printer output to a file.

Pipes don't redirect output to a file, they redirect output to STDIN of
another process.  And DOS had both pipes and redirection, in a
partially-broken way, though DOS lacks most of the useful tools for
manipulating things with pipes....

--
Matt G|There is no Darkness in Eternity/But only Light too dim for us to see
Brainbench MVP for Linux Admin /
http://www.brainbench.com     /  "He is a rhythmic movement of the
-----------------------------/    penguins, is Tux." --MegaHAL

 
 
 

prn -> ps converters

Post by Victor Wagn » Thu, 21 Feb 2002 14:48:04



 : Hello,

 : Does anyone know of any converters which will convert
 : the MS .prn file format to postscript? I would assume
 : that prn is converted to ps at some point when files
 : are printed on Windows computers. Too bad MS does not
 : have pipes to redirect printer output to a file.

If you've installed correct printer driver under Windows,
.prn IS postscript.

--

 
 
 

prn -> ps converters

Post by Lew Pitch » Thu, 21 Feb 2002 21:49:01


On Tue, 19 Feb 2002 20:03:23 -0330, Neil Zanella


>Hello,

>Does anyone know of any converters which will convert
>the MS .prn file format to postscript?

Not off hand, but (assuming that you have a printer compatable with
the printer originally selected for Windows) you should be able to
'print' a .PRN file to the 'raw' printer and get something usefull.

Quote:>I would assume
>that prn is converted to ps at some point when files
>are printed on Windows computers.

.PRN files are stored in the raw data format of the specific printer
for which they were generated. To make a .PRN file in MSWindows, you
have to select a printer, then "print to file" using that printer's
profile.

If you have selected a printer that happens to be a Postscript
printer, the .PRN file will contain postscript. OTOH, if you selected
a printer that (say) uses PCL (i.e. an HP injet printer), then the
.PRN file will contain PCL.

Quote:> Too bad MS does not have pipes to redirect printer output to a file.

That's exactly what they _do_ have; a per-application, GUI-selected
and managed pipe which moves the raw, printer-specific, printstream to
a file instead of it's printer. Think of the MSWindows "print-to-file"
as a printcap :of: which writes to file (or, perhaps, a :lp: which is
a file rather than a device).

Quote:>Thanks,

>Neil

Lew Pitcher, Information Technology Consultant, Toronto Dominion Bank Financial Group

(Opinions expressed are my own, not my employer's.)