Partitions

Partitions

Post by Shme » Mon, 15 Jun 1998 04:00:00



I'm reinstalling Linux on my computer and want to know how to partition it.
I was using RH5.0 and I had 2 partitions:
One 60M partition for /
and one 1800M partition for /usr

I did this at the suggestion of a couple of linux books I have but I ran out
of disk space for /.
Is there any way to resize the root (/) partition?
Also, do I even need multiple partitions?  I'm using a 2G hard drive by
itself so I'm not installing through multi drives.  Why would you partition
it the way I did anyway?

Thanks
Shawn

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Partitions

Post by Jay T » Tue, 16 Jun 1998 04:00:00



> I'm reinstalling Linux on my computer and want to know how to partition it.
> I was using RH5.0 and I had 2 partitions:
> One 60M partition for /
> and one 1800M partition for /usr

> do I even need multiple partitions?

No.  I don't bother.

Quote:>  Why would you partition it the way I did anyway?

Historically (for Unix systems) it has often been recommended, to keep
the system stuff in root on a separate filesystem than the "user stuff"
in /usr.  If the /usr filesystem becomes corrupt due to a crash
(especially while running numerous applications with files open), then
the / filesystem is not necessarily affected.  If you happen to lose
some essential files in /etc, the system may not be bootable.

Also, since things in / don't change as often as what's in /usr (which
used to include the users' home directories), keeping them separate
would perhaps reduce fragmentation of the / filesystem.  But don't worry
about that one.

Sometimes / and /usr (and nowadays /var and /home) are put on separate
disks (note, *disks*, not just partitions).  This can help with
performance.  For example, if you have /home and / on separate disks,
you are in your home directory in /home/user and do a

vi file

the vi executable is read in from one disk (/) and the file is read from
another (/home), so you get some extra performance from the parallel
accesses.  I've read that extra performance can happen if some
combination of /, /home, /usr, /var, /tmp, etc. are kept on separate
disks, but I don't know the full details of how much performance
increase to expect, which are most important to split up, and on what
operations additional performance would be significant.

Actually, this is probably worth some modern research, since CPUs and
RAM have increased in speed much more than hard disks over the past 10
or so years.  Maybe someone has studied that recently...

- Jay Ts

--
Click on http://www.kachina.net/~jay to find out about
Linux Consulting, Web Design and Programming Services.

To be o' not t'be, dat be de bottom line.  What it is, Mama!
        - output of 'fortune | jive'

 
 
 

Partitions

Post by Gary L. Henniga » Tue, 16 Jun 1998 04:00:00


| >
| > I'm reinstalling Linux on my computer and want to know how to partition it.
| > I was using RH5.0 and I had 2 partitions:
| > One 60M partition for /
| > and one 1800M partition for /usr
| >
| > do I even need multiple partitions?
|
| No.  I don't bother.

[other useful info/opinon snipped]

There are a few advantages to partitioning your disks.

1) fsck time - Most linux systems I've seen run fsck after an ext2
partition has been mounted so many times (20 on Debian). If you've got
a particularly large disk with just a single partition this fsck can
take a considerable amount of time. Personally I partition my disk(s)
and stagger the number of mounts after which fsck will be run for each
partition. This minimizes the amount of time any one boot will take
doing an fsck. Of course if your system runs 24/7 this isn't as much
of an issue.

2) backups - Many larger installation prefer to do backups on a
per-partition basis and stagger when "level 0" backups are done on a
particular partition. It's more efficient this way and allows you to
more easily restore specific files that might need restoring.

Of course, for personal systems, it's really just a matter of
preference.

To the original poster, you can read the mini-HOWTO for partitioning
and maybe get some ideas. Take a peek at:

http://www.ssc.com/linux/LDP/HOWTO/mini/Partition.html

Gary

 
 
 

1. Partition Software - Partition Magic, Bootit, Boot Manager or Ranish Partition Manager


spake unto us, saying:

By default, Solaris and Linux will not be able to see each other, and
the Windows flavors will not be able to see either one.  So your only
concern will be the visibility between NT and Win95.

If you install those two in primary partitions on the same drive, there
shouldn't be a problem with that either.

Bootit is a utility I know of but have not used.

The only "Boot Manager" I know about is the OS/2 Boot Manager (also the
same as the IBM Boot Manager included as part of Partition Magic 3.x),
and it's a nice basic boot menu, but I'm not sure it's available at all
as a separate product.  I've used it for years (since 1992 I think).

Partition Magic is a glorified (and relatively powerful) fdisk utility
which I've used for quite a while.  Very useful, IMhO.  Newer versions
have things I'm not familiar with (I'm still using the OS/2 version of
PM 2.03).

Ranish's Partition Manager looks like a REALLY slick utility, and it's
on my list to play with.  But I copped out and bought a copy of System
Commander here instead.  :-)

I think I would recommend that you add System Commander to your list
above, since it allows you to selectively change primary partition
visibility (in many cases) for each individual boot menu entry.

Really, though, you probably don't need it.  The only question I would
have is how to get NT's boot manager to get along with Solaris' boot
manager, and I suspect that can be done.

--

       OS/2 + Linux (Slackware+RedHat+SuSE) + FreeBSD + Solaris +
        WinNT4 + Win95 + PC/GEOS + Executor = PC Hobbyist Heaven!
                   OPCODE: HCF = Halt and Catch Fire

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