Reiserfs root partition resize

Reiserfs root partition resize

Post by Gert Kleeman » Tue, 01 Jul 2003 03:22:37



Hey,

I installed Gentoo and left some space for windows, but Gentoo rocks so
much that i really dont need to install windows.

Could someone post working steps to resize my root partion?

Also how safe is it to resize the partition? I really dont want to
install Gentoo again :P

Thanks,
Gert

 
 
 

Reiserfs root partition resize

Post by Michael Heimin » Tue, 01 Jul 2003 04:43:55



> Hey,
> I installed Gentoo and left some space for windows, but Gentoo rocks so
> much that i really dont need to install windows.
> Could someone post working steps to resize my root partion?
> Also how safe is it to resize the partition? I really dont want to
> install Gentoo again :P

Why do you want to resize your / at all? There's no reason,
you can create a new fs on the M$ partition and use it
as /home or /usr, wherever you need space.

--
Michael Heiming

Remove +SIGNS and www. if you expect an answer, sorry for
inconvenience, but I get tons of SPAM

 
 
 

Reiserfs root partition resize

Post by mjt » Tue, 01 Jul 2003 06:16:16



> I installed Gentoo and left some space for windows, but Gentoo rocks so
> much that i really dont need to install windows.

... i absolutely LOVE reading stuff like this.

Quote:> Could someone post working steps to resize my root partion?
> Also how safe is it to resize the partition? I really dont want to
> install Gentoo again :P

a lot depends on what your current partition strategy is. anyway,
there is the reiser utilities package, which includes resizing
the partition. not much to it, other than running the package.


reiserfsck (8)       - check a Linux Reiserfs file system
mkreiserfs (8)       - create a Linux ReiserFS file system
reiserfstune (8)     - (unknown)
resize_reiserfs (8)  - Reiserfs filesystem resizer
debugreiserfs (8)    - (unknown)
reiserfsck (8)       - check a Linux Reiserfs file system
mkreiserfs (8)       - create a Linux ReiserFS file system
reiserfstune (8)     - (unknown)
resize_reiserfs (8)  - Reiserfs filesystem resizer
debugreiserfs (8)    - (unknown)

--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 Michael J. Tobler: motorcyclist, surfer,  #    Black holes result
 skydiver, and author: "Inside Linux",     #   when God divides the  
 "C++ HowTo", "C++ Unleashed"              #     universe by zero

 
 
 

Reiserfs root partition resize

Post by mjt » Tue, 01 Jul 2003 06:43:41


... to further this, i would get knoppix.com or use gentoo's bootable
CD to do the partitioning.
.
--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 Michael J. Tobler: motorcyclist, surfer,  #    Black holes result
 skydiver, and author: "Inside Linux",     #   when God divides the  
 "C++ HowTo", "C++ Unleashed"              #     universe by zero

 
 
 

Reiserfs root partition resize

Post by Gert Kleeman » Tue, 01 Jul 2003 07:13:52




>>Hey,

>>I installed Gentoo and left some space for windows, but Gentoo rocks so
>>much that i really dont need to install windows.

>>Could someone post working steps to resize my root partion?

>>Also how safe is it to resize the partition? I really dont want to
>>install Gentoo again :P

> Why do you want to resize your / at all? There's no reason,
> you can create a new fs on the M$ partition and use it
> as /home or /usr, wherever you need space.

I thought about doing simply mounting it somewhere, but i would prefer
to have one large root disk.

There must be a way to resize it ... or not?

 
 
 

Reiserfs root partition resize

Post by Michael Heimin » Tue, 01 Jul 2003 07:43:59


...

Quote:> I thought about doing simply mounting it somewhere, but i would prefer
> to have one large root disk.

One does usually use several partitions on a Linux system.

/
/usr
/boot (not really needed anymore)
/tmp
/home
/var
/opt (perhaps)

Might be a little overkill for a desktop, but
I'd put at least /home on it's own partition.

Quote:> There must be a way to resize it ... or not?

Yep, follow 'man resize_reiserfs'.

--
Michael Heiming

Remove +SIGNS and www. if you expect an answer, sorry for
inconvenience, but I get tons of SPAM

 
 
 

Reiserfs root partition resize

Post by Szomraky Stefa » Tue, 01 Jul 2003 14:41:49



> One does usually use several partitions on a Linux system.

> /
> /usr
> /boot (not really needed anymore)
> /tmp
> /home
> /var
> /opt (perhaps)

> Might be a little overkill for a desktop, but
> I'd put at least /home on it's own partition.

Actually, this is no longer usefull. You'll only run in space problems
if you decide to do so!! (Space left on /usr, but not enough on /home,
etc..)

It's unnecessary too. Most people only have a single HDD. If /usr
crashes, then it's 99% certain that /home will crash too.

Traditionally this was done in the 60ties because Unices were booted
from many tapes (small root tape, big /usr tape), and this REALLY
improved speed and safety.

 
 
 

Reiserfs root partition resize

Post by Michael Heimin » Tue, 01 Jul 2003 15:07:37




>> One does usually use several partitions on a Linux system.

>> /
>> /usr
>> /boot (not really needed anymore)
>> /tmp
>> /home
>> /var
>> /opt (perhaps)

Oops, forgot:
swap

Quote:

>> Might be a little overkill for a desktop, but
>> I'd put at least /home on it's own partition.
> Actually, this is no longer usefull. You'll only run in space problems
> if you decide to do so!! (Space left on /usr, but not enough on /home,
> etc..)

This is your personal opinion, I disagree, here is a nice article
explaining it all:

http://linux.oreillynet.com/pub/a/linux/2001/10/11/filesystem.html

--
Michael Heiming

Remove +SIGNS and www. if you expect an answer, sorry for
inconvenience, but I get tons of SPAM

 
 
 

Reiserfs root partition resize

Post by Gert Kleeman » Tue, 01 Jul 2003 16:40:36




> ...

>>I thought about doing simply mounting it somewhere, but i would prefer
>>to have one large root disk.

> One does usually use several partitions on a Linux system.

> /
> /usr
> /boot (not really needed anymore)
> /tmp
> /home
> /var
> /opt (perhaps)

> Might be a little overkill for a desktop, but
> I'd put at least /home on it's own partition.

>>There must be a way to resize it ... or not?

> Yep, follow 'man resize_reiserfs'.

Noticed that one ... but the thing that really bugged me was the warning
  message at the bottom.
"Warning: Note that this is a BETA program and may corrupt filesystems!"
So i decided to do a little scouting first ... although i probably
phrased my question badly.
 
 
 

Reiserfs root partition resize

Post by Peter T. Breue » Tue, 01 Jul 2003 18:53:21




>> One does usually use several partitions on a Linux system.
>> /
>> /usr
>> /boot (not really needed anymore)
>> /tmp
>> /home
>> /var
>> /opt (perhaps)

>> Might be a little overkill for a desktop, but
>> I'd put at least /home on it's own partition.
> Actually, this is no longer usefull. You'll only run in space problems

Rubbish. It's a fine setup. His /boot and /tmp can be common to several
distro's installations, and so can his /opt. I'd add /usr/local, and
point /usr/src into there.

Quote:> if you decide to do so!! (Space left on /usr, but not enough on /home,

Nonsense. /usr does not change in size! It's readonly!

Quote:> It's unnecessary too. Most people only have a single HDD. If /usr

No, it's very necessary. As you'll find out the next time your disk
develops a bad zone.

Quote:> crashes, then it's 99% certain that /home will crash too.
> Traditionally this was done in the 60ties because Unices were booted

No, it's been done all the time, for the obvious reasons of self
preservation ..  many small partitions are zillions of times safer than
one big one, because you can mount them readonly, or sync, or noatime,
or whatever, according to usage.

Quote:> from many tapes (small root tape, big /usr tape), and this REALLY
> improved speed and safety.

Nonsense. In the first place you are confusing the 60s with the 80s
(which tells me you weren't around for either), and in the second place
you are an idiot, who plainly doesn't administer systems, so please
just go away ...

Peter

 
 
 

Reiserfs root partition resize

Post by Christopher Brown » Tue, 01 Jul 2003 20:55:32




>> One does usually use several partitions on a Linux system.
>> /
>> /usr
>> /boot (not really needed anymore)
>> /tmp
>> /home
>> /var
>> /opt (perhaps)
>> Might be a little overkill for a desktop, but
>> I'd put at least /home on it's own partition.

> Actually, this is no longer usefull. You'll only run in space problems
> if you decide to do so!! (Space left on /usr, but not enough on /home,
> etc..)

> It's unnecessary too. Most people only have a single HDD. If /usr
> crashes, then it's 99% certain that /home will crash too.

> Traditionally this was done in the 60ties because Unices were booted
> from many tapes (small root tape, big /usr tape), and this REALLY
> improved speed and safety.

The reasons haven't gone away, although _some_ are no longer as vital.

In yesteryear, it was important for /sbin and / to be separate, as
booting from tape was a Real Pain, and the vital tools on /sbin were,
well, vital.  The availability of boot CDs makes it far less important
to have /usr and /boot and /opt separate.

On the other hand, having those three filesystems mountable read-only
is useful from a security perspective.

In contrast, /var obviously has to be read/write, as is /tmp.  It
wouldn't be outrageous for /tmp to be a link to /var/tmp.

/home is the only filesystem that forcibly has to be backed up in
totality; it sure is nice for it to be separate from the others so
that it is easy to back up, as well as so that you may install a new
Linux distribution without forcibly having to blow away "your files."

Root is separate from all of the others, so that adds up to at least
four filesystems:
 1.  /usr /sbin /opt /boot (perhaps shared on one fs)
 2.  /var /tmp (perhaps shared on one fs)
 3.  / (probably with just /etc stored there)
 4.  /home
--

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"The  Unix philosophy  is  to  provide some  scraps  of  metal and  an
enormous roll of duct tape.  With those -- and possibly some scraps of
your own -- you can conquer the world." -- G. Sumner Hayes

 
 
 

Reiserfs root partition resize

Post by Michael Buchenriede » Tue, 01 Jul 2003 22:58:10




>> One does usually use several partitions on a Linux system.

>> /
>> /usr
>> /boot (not really needed anymore)
>> /tmp
>> /home
>> /var
>> /opt (perhaps)

>> Might be a little overkill for a desktop, but
>> I'd put at least /home on it's own partition.

My setup looks quite similar.

Quote:>Actually, this is no longer usefull.

Wrong.

Quote:>You'll only run in space problems
>if you decide to do so!! (Space left on /usr, but not enough on /home,
>etc..)

Well, once you fill up the 60 or 80 GB on that single part. you are talking
about, the very same happens.

Quote:>It's unnecessary too. Most people only have a single HDD.

I tend to disagree. And apart from that - the statement makes no sense at
all.

Quote:

>If /usr
>crashes, then it's 99% certain that /home will crash too.

This is

a) incorrect (at least as far as saving your valuable data is
   concerned) [1]
b) misleading, as a HD crash is far from being the only crit. situation
   you might come across on a system in operation. [2]

Quote:>Traditionally this was done in the 60ties because Unices were booted
>from many tapes (small root tape, big /usr tape), and this REALLY
>improved speed and safety.

Rubbish. [3]

Michael

[1] In case of a HD failure, it is far more likely that you will be able
    to mount single partitions from a rescue CD separately, copy the data
    elsewhere and get away without too much loss of data. The _total_ loss
    of a HD from one day to the next is the least probably one (though it
    happens as well); typically, HD errors can be detected in time and
    precautions be taken. [4]
[2] Think about an update. Or a reinstallation. Or security.
[3] Tape boot was a nice feature, but it was only done for installing
    the operating system.
[4] smartmontools. Backup system(s) in place.

--

          Lumber Cartel Unit #456 (TINLC) & Official Netscum
    Note: If you want me to send you email, don't munge your address.

 
 
 

Reiserfs root partition resize

Post by Bruce All » Wed, 02 Jul 2003 15:41:46


Quote:> [1] In case of a HD failure, it is far more likely that you will be able
>     to mount single partitions from a rescue CD separately, copy the data
>     elsewhere and get away without too much loss of data. The _total_ loss
>     of a HD from one day to the next is the least probably one (though it
>     happens as well); typically, HD errors can be detected in time and
>     precautions be taken. [4]
<SNIP>
> [4] smartmontools. Backup system(s) in place.

I just wanted to provide a URL:

http://smartmontools.sourceforge.net/

 
 
 

1. Newbie needs help resizing ReiserFS partitions

I have the following setup on hda:

/dev/hda3       /               ReiserFS        
/dev/hda1          /boot        ext2
/dev/hda4          /home        ReiserFS

I am using SuSE 7.1

My / partiton is filling up and I would like to shrink /home and give the space
to / is there any way to do this? I don't think GnuParted or Partition Magic do
Reiser yet.

Thanks, Brad

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