"/usr" versus "/usr/local"

"/usr" versus "/usr/local"

Post by Flej Lin » Sun, 31 Dec 1899 09:00:00



I have Redhat 6.0 installed and find that "/usr" and "/usr/local" have many
of the same folder names in them, for example:

/usr/bin and /usr/local/bin
/usr/sbin and /usr/local/sbin
/usr/doc and /usr/local/doc
/usr/etc and /usr/local/etc
/usr/man and /usr/local/man
/usr/lib and /usr/local/lib
/usr/include and /usr/local/include

Is this normal or have I configured things wrong? Does Redhat use only the
"/usr", only the "/usr/local", or both?

Flej Ling

 
 
 

"/usr" versus "/usr/local"

Post by brw.. » Sun, 31 Dec 1899 09:00:00



> I have Redhat 6.0 installed and find that "/usr" and "/usr/local" have many
> of the same folder names in them, for example:
> /usr/lib and /usr/local/lib
> /usr/include and /usr/local/include

etc...

Quote:> Is this normal or have I configured things wrong? Does Redhat use only the
> "/usr", only the "/usr/local", or both?

Your setup is fine.  /usr is generally installed by the system, while /usr/local
is generally reserved for installs local to your system. If you install some
new software, it is likely that it will go into /usr/local.
Quote:> Flej Ling


 
 
 

"/usr" versus "/usr/local"

Post by Floyd Davidso » Sun, 31 Dec 1899 09:00:00



>I have Redhat 6.0 installed and find that "/usr" and "/usr/local" have many
>of the same folder names in them, for example:

>/usr/bin and /usr/local/bin
>/usr/sbin and /usr/local/sbin
>/usr/doc and /usr/local/doc
>/usr/etc and /usr/local/etc
>/usr/man and /usr/local/man
>/usr/lib and /usr/local/lib
>/usr/include and /usr/local/include

>Is this normal or have I configured things wrong? Does Redhat use only the
>"/usr", only the "/usr/local", or both?

Configure your PATH to use /usr/local/bin before /usr/bin (same
with sbin).  From that point on, if you change and program in
/bin, /sbin, /usr/bin or /usr/sbin, put the new version in
/usr/local/bin or /usr/local/sbin instead, and leave the
original where it is.  Because of your PATH, the new version
will be used.

However, a year or two from now when you want to upgrade to the
latest version of your distribution, change the PATH by deleting
/usr/local references, and in an instant your system is back to
being configured as per the original distribution.

The scripts used in the new distribution to upgrade will expect
programs to act the way the previous distribution programs did,
and may fail if the original programs are replaced by upgraded
versions with slight variations in functionality or output
formatting.

--
Floyd L. Davidson         <http://www.ptialaska.net/~floyd>

 
 
 

"/usr" versus "/usr/local"

Post by Bill Unr » Sun, 31 Dec 1899 09:00:00



]I have Redhat 6.0 installed and find that "/usr" and "/usr/local" have many
]of the same folder names in them, for example:

]/usr/bin and /usr/local/bin
]/usr/sbin and /usr/local/sbin
]/usr/doc and /usr/local/doc
]/usr/etc and /usr/local/etc
]/usr/man and /usr/local/man
]/usr/lib and /usr/local/lib
]/usr/include and /usr/local/include

]Is this normal or have I configured things wrong? Does Redhat use only the
]"/usr", only the "/usr/local", or both?

By tradition /usr/local is the place to put things which you compile and
place on your system, while /usr is the place for things which come with the
operating system. If /usr/local is placed on a different partition, then
when you reinstall the OS all of your special programs are left unaffected
and do not need to be reinstalled.

 
 
 

"/usr" versus "/usr/local"

Post by Grant Edwar » Sun, 31 Dec 1899 09:00:00



>]Is this normal or have I configured things wrong? Does Redhat use only the
>]"/usr", only the "/usr/local", or both?

>By tradition /usr/local is the place to put things which you compile and
>place on your system, while /usr is the place for things which come with the
>operating system. If /usr/local is placed on a different partition, then
>when you reinstall the OS all of your special programs are left unaffected
>and do not need to be reinstalled.

I highly recommend keeping /usr/local and home directories on
non-system partitions (different than / or /usr).  That way you
can re-install from scratch without loosing stuff...

--
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