Windows Emulators

Windows Emulators

Post by Dennis Nigbu » Tue, 24 Dec 2002 20:33:50



Dear group,

since I still need to use some Windows programs although I've started
working mainly with Linux, I'm looking at emulation software. I'm using
SuSE 8.0, for which, as far as I'm aware, VMWare, WINE, and Win4Lin are all
available and should work.

Can anyone point me to reviews and other articles on the Net that can teach
me something about how these emulators work, what their individual
strengths are, and whether there are any known compatibility issues?

Merry Christmas to you all!
--
The other Dennis

 
 
 

Windows Emulators

Post by Anthony Lawrenc » Tue, 24 Dec 2002 22:23:34



> Dear group,

> since I still need to use some Windows programs although I've started
> working mainly with Linux, I'm looking at emulation software. I'm using
> SuSE 8.0, for which, as far as I'm aware, VMWare, WINE, and Win4Lin are all
> available and should work.

> Can anyone point me to reviews and other articles on the Net that can teach
> me something about how these emulators work, what their individual
> strengths are, and whether there are any known compatibility issues?

I think Google can point you to more than you'd ever want to know about
any of those.

--
Tony Lawrence
Free  Linux Skills Test: http://aplawrence.com/skillstest.html

 
 
 

Windows Emulators

Post by Carl Fin » Tue, 24 Dec 2002 23:16:37



> since I still need to use some Windows programs although I've started
> working mainly with Linux, I'm looking at emulation software. I'm using
> SuSE 8.0, for which, as far as I'm aware, VMWare, WINE, and Win4Lin are all
> available and should work.

Well, WINE stands for Wine Is Not an Emulator.  And VMWare and
Win4Lin aren't Windows emulators -- they're x86 PC emulators.  All
three have web sites you could find with a 30 second search.
--

I-Con's Science and Technology Programming
<http://www.iconsf.org/>
 
 
 

Windows Emulators

Post by Malk » Wed, 25 Dec 2002 00:10:04




>> Dear group,

>> since I still need to use some Windows programs although I've started
>> working mainly with Linux, I'm looking at emulation software. I'm
>> using SuSE 8.0, for which, as far as I'm aware, VMWare, WINE, and
>> Win4Lin are all available and should work.

>> Can anyone point me to reviews and other articles on the Net that can
>> teach me something about how these emulators work, what their
>> individual strengths are, and whether there are any known
>> compatibility issues?

> I think Google can point you to more than you'd ever want to know
> about any of those.

You don't say which Windows programs you need, either.  If it is Office,
check out Codeweavers' CrossOver Office - it is great.

Malke
--
Elephant Boy Computers
www.elephantboycomputers.com
"Don't Panic!"
remove 3's to reply

 
 
 

Windows Emulators

Post by Sundial Service » Wed, 25 Dec 2002 01:23:01



> since I still need to use some Windows programs although I've started
> working mainly with Linux, I'm looking at emulation software. I'm using
> SuSE 8.0, for which, as far as I'm aware, VMWare, WINE, and Win4Lin are
> all available and should work.

First of all, test to see if you really /do/ need that Windows software.  
For example, "http://www.openoffice.org" provides an Office-suite that in
my humble opinion is not only _compatible_ with MS-Office files {reading
and writing}, but actually _better._

Second:  "WINE = Wine Is Not an Emulator."  WINE is a direct port of
Win16/Win32 to the Linux environment .. bugs and all.

VMWare and the like are "x86 virtual-machines."  They create an environment
that matches a "bare machine," and you can boot another operating system
(even Linux, BTW) in the environment that they create.

Quote:> Can anyone point me to reviews and other articles on the Net that can
> teach me something about how these emulators work, what their individual
> strengths are, and whether there are any known compatibility issues?

No, but Google and the vendor's web-sites can, /ad/ /nauseum./

Quote:> Merry Christmas to you all!

And to you and yours!

----------------------------------
Fast automatic Paradox table repair at a click of a mouse!
http://www.sundialservices.com/products/chimneysweep

 
 
 

Windows Emulators

Post by B. Joshua Rose » Wed, 25 Dec 2002 01:53:32



> Dear group,

> since I still need to use some Windows programs although I've started
> working mainly with Linux, I'm looking at emulation software. I'm using
> SuSE 8.0, for which, as far as I'm aware, VMWare, WINE, and Win4Lin are
> all available and should work.

> Can anyone point me to reviews and other articles on the Net that can
> teach me something about how these emulators work, what their individual
> strengths are, and whether there are any known compatibility issues?

> Merry Christmas to you all!

If what you want to run are applications like MS Office, Quickbooks,
Framemaker and thing like that then Win4Lin is the best choice. I've been
using it for several years and it works very well for basic Win9x
applications. Win4Lin gives you full Win9x networking on top of full
Linux networking (for example you can mount SAMBA and Windoze shares
directly thorugh network neighborhood, in addition you can mount any
Linux partition as a drive so NFS mounted directories are accessible to
Windoze applications). The performance of Windoze applications on Win4Lin
is as good or better than native performance and Win98 on Win4Lin is
significantly more stable than native Win98.

The limitations of Win4Lin are the following,

1) Only supports 128M of RAM, this isn't a problem for Office type
applications but it could be if you wanted to use it for some heavy duty
crunching.

2) Doesn't handle serial port devices well.

3) It's Win9x only so if a program requires Win2K or better you can't run
it.

I use Wine for command line Windoze applications and it works fine with
them however using it for real GUI based Windows apps is problematical.
Your best bet if you want to use Wine is to try Crossover Office.

I've never tried VMware, it's more expensive than Win4Lin but it does
support Win2K and WinXP.

 
 
 

Windows Emulators

Post by Carl Fin » Wed, 25 Dec 2002 02:40:51




Quote:> Second:  "WINE = Wine Is Not an Emulator."  WINE is a direct port of
> Win16/Win32 to the Linux environment .. bugs and all.

No, it isn't.  How could it be, when Microsoft doesn't release
source?

It's an emulation of the win16 and win32 APIs.
--

Manager, Dueling Modems Computer Forum
<http://dm.net>

 
 
 

Windows Emulators

Post by Peter T. Breue » Wed, 25 Dec 2002 03:34:42





>> Second:  "WINE = Wine Is Not an Emulator."  WINE is a direct port of
>> Win16/Win32 to the Linux environment .. bugs and all.
> No, it isn't.  How could it be, when Microsoft doesn't release
> source?

Easily. It's called a "clean room" implementation. First somebody specs
the inteface, reverse engineering the windows stuff if necessary, then
somebody else implements it (pickles it in wine).

Quote:> It's an emulation of the win16 and win32 APIs.

No it isn't. It's an implementaton of them.

Peter

 
 
 

Windows Emulators

Post by Max Bernaer » Wed, 25 Dec 2002 04:11:24




>> Dear group,

>> since I still need to use some Windows programs although I've started
>> working mainly with Linux, I'm looking at emulation software. I'm using
>> SuSE 8.0, for which, as far as I'm aware, VMWare, WINE, and Win4Lin are
>> all available and should work.

>> Can anyone point me to reviews and other articles on the Net that can
>> teach me something about how these emulators work, what their individual
>> strengths are, and whether there are any known compatibility issues?

>> Merry Christmas to you all!

> If what you want to run are applications like MS Office, Quickbooks,
> Framemaker and thing like that then Win4Lin is the best choice. I've been
> using it for several years and it works very well for basic Win9x
> applications. Win4Lin gives you full Win9x networking on top of full
> Linux networking (for example you can mount SAMBA and Windoze shares
> directly thorugh network neighborhood, in addition you can mount any
> Linux partition as a drive so NFS mounted directories are accessible to
> Windoze applications). The performance of Windoze applications on Win4Lin
> is as good or better than native performance and Win98 on Win4Lin is
> significantly more stable than native Win98.

> The limitations of Win4Lin are the following,

> 1) Only supports 128M of RAM, this isn't a problem for Office type
> applications but it could be if you wanted to use it for some heavy duty
> crunching.

> 2) Doesn't handle serial port devices well.

> 3) It's Win9x only so if a program requires Win2K or better you can't run
> it.

> I use Wine for command line Windoze applications and it works fine with
> them however using it for real GUI based Windows apps is problematical.
> Your best bet if you want to use Wine is to try Crossover Office.

> I've never tried VMware, it's more expensive than Win4Lin but it does
> support Win2K and WinXP.

Thank you for the information.

I am new to Linux. I am evaluating the purchase of Win4Lin for running
Microfocus cobol compiler and Delphi 5.

The Microfocus cobol compiler is using a plug on the centronics port.

Is this possible ?

Thanks for your time.

Max.

 
 
 

Windows Emulators

Post by B. Joshua Rose » Wed, 25 Dec 2002 04:31:20





>>> Dear group,

>>> since I still need to use some Windows programs although I've started
>>> working mainly with Linux, I'm looking at emulation software. I'm
>>> using SuSE 8.0, for which, as far as I'm aware, VMWare, WINE, and
>>> Win4Lin are all available and should work.

>>> Can anyone point me to reviews and other articles on the Net that can
>>> teach me something about how these emulators work, what their
>>> individual strengths are, and whether there are any known
>>> compatibility issues?

>>> Merry Christmas to you all!

>> If what you want to run are applications like MS Office, Quickbooks,
>> Framemaker and thing like that then Win4Lin is the best choice. I've
>> been using it for several years and it works very well for basic Win9x
>> applications. Win4Lin gives you full Win9x networking on top of full
>> Linux networking (for example you can mount SAMBA and Windoze shares
>> directly thorugh network neighborhood, in addition you can mount any
>> Linux partition as a drive so NFS mounted directories are accessible to
>> Windoze applications). The performance of Windoze applications on
>> Win4Lin is as good or better than native performance and Win98 on
>> Win4Lin is significantly more stable than native Win98.

>> The limitations of Win4Lin are the following,

>> 1) Only supports 128M of RAM, this isn't a problem for Office type
>> applications but it could be if you wanted to use it for some heavy
>> duty crunching.

>> 2) Doesn't handle serial port devices well.

>> 3) It's Win9x only so if a program requires Win2K or better you can't
>> run it.

>> I use Wine for command line Windoze applications and it works fine with
>> them however using it for real GUI based Windows apps is problematical.
>> Your best bet if you want to use Wine is to try Crossover Office.

>> I've never tried VMware, it's more expensive than Win4Lin but it does
>> support Win2K and WinXP.

> Thank you for the information.

> I am new to Linux. I am evaluating the purchase of Win4Lin for running
> Microfocus cobol compiler and Delphi 5.

> The Microfocus cobol compiler is using a plug on the centronics port.

> Is this possible ?

> Thanks for your time.

> Max.

I don't think a dongle will work, if they support flexlm then that's what
you should use. Also there is a GNU cobol project, have you checked out
native cobol compilers for Linux?
 
 
 

Windows Emulators

Post by Carl Fin » Wed, 25 Dec 2002 04:32:43




>> No, it isn't.  How could it be, when Microsoft doesn't release
>> source?

> Easily. It's called a "clean room" implementation. First somebody specs
> the inteface, reverse engineering the windows stuff if necessary, then
> somebody else implements it (pickles it in wine).

That wouldn't be a "port" as I understand the term.

Quote:>> It's an emulation of the win16 and win32 APIs.

> No it isn't. It's an implementaton of them.

Fair enough.
--

I-Con's Science and Technology Programming
<http://www.iconsf.org/>
 
 
 

Windows Emulators

Post by Max Bernaer » Wed, 25 Dec 2002 04:43:50


Quote:

>> I am new to Linux. I am evaluating the purchase of Win4Lin for running
>> Microfocus cobol compiler and Delphi 5.

>> The Microfocus cobol compiler is using a plug on the centronics port.

>> Is this possible ?

>> Thanks for your time.

>> Max.

> I don't think a dongle will work, if they support flexlm then that's what
> you should use. Also there is a GNU cobol project, have you checked out
> native cobol compilers for Linux?

Yes, there is no equivalent to Microfocus at this moment.

There is a commercial cobol compiler Acucobol.

With Acucobol we have to pay user licenses.

I am converting my cobol programs to Delphi at this moment (in the evening).

I can ask it directly to Netraverse.

On the site of Netraverse they specify Delphi can be ported.

Thank you for the information and your time.

Max.

 
 
 

Windows Emulators

Post by Peter T. Breue » Wed, 25 Dec 2002 04:47:33





>>> No, it isn't.  How could it be, when Microsoft doesn't release
>>> source?

>> Easily. It's called a "clean room" implementation. First somebody specs
>> the inteface, reverse engineering the windows stuff if necessary, then
>> somebody else implements it (pickles it in wine).
> That wouldn't be a "port" as I understand the term.

Well, you have a point. A port usually uses whitebox info, because
it's assumed that the target system is like the source system, and so
the code is of use.  But it doesn't have to.  The linux kernel ports,
for example, often don't have any way to make use of each others code,
but yes, they do benefit from seeing how it's been done on the other
system.

Still, a port is quite possible with only a blackbox to look at.
And in the case of  wine, people run disassemblers, tracers, and so on,
to get greybox data.

Quote:>>> It's an emulation of the win16 and win32 APIs.

>> No it isn't. It's an implementation of them.

Peter
 
 
 

Windows Emulators

Post by Ken Bloo » Wed, 25 Dec 2002 06:42:33




> I am new to Linux. I am evaluating the purchase of Win4Lin for running
> Microfocus cobol compiler and Delphi 5.

Have a look at Kylix 3. It's approximately an implimentation of Delphi
and C++ Builder for Linux
Quote:> The Microfocus cobol compiler is using a plug on the centronics port.

> Is this possible ?

 
 
 

Windows Emulators

Post by Max Bernaer » Wed, 25 Dec 2002 08:47:05





>> I am new to Linux. I am evaluating the purchase of Win4Lin for running
>> Microfocus cobol compiler and Delphi 5.

> Have a look at Kylix 3. It's approximately an implimentation of Delphi
> and C++ Builder for Linux

>> The Microfocus cobol compiler is using a plug on the centronics port.

>> Is this possible ?

I have the Kylix 3 installed on Mandrake 9.0.

The problem is that I bought components from Turbopower, ElevateSoft, etc.

Those components are not available for the moment for Kylix.

I shall buy them when they become available for Kylix.

For Microfocus they use a plug on the centronics port (printer port).

If the plug is not on it, you cannot compile your own programs end not
edit your source files.

For office, it is a long time I not use Microsoft Office.

I use StarOffice.

All other software is available on Linux.

Max.

 
 
 

1. windows emulators???

Why is everyone saying www.winehq.com? I try to get to it and it doesn't
exist!!!

it could get a little
goes I guess one would use
true?

------------------  Posted via CNET Linux Help  ------------------
                    http://www.searchlinux.com

2. UUCP on SCO5

3. X windows emulator

4. XF86Config Woes, part 2

5. WINE (WINdows Emulator) Frequently Asked Questions

6. read file into array

7. best windows emulator

8. asppp Problems

9. Seeking X-Windows emulator

10. Are there Windows emulators for Linux?

11. Wanted: MSDOS X-Windows Emulator

12. Windows emulator?

13. x-windows emulator ??