Linux Database for commercial project

Linux Database for commercial project

Post by Warren Rodi » Wed, 14 Apr 1999 04:00:00



I have to set up a back end database for a web site.  I want to use linux to
run the server and I need to select a database for it.

I had been planning on using Oracle but we have just been quoted $30000
(Aus) per CPU (We were thinking 2 cpus) and that seems maybe a bit
expensive.

Does anyone have any experience with other databases under linux (redhat)?

We want this site to be very stable.
The database size will probably be around 10+Gb but the structure itself
will be relatively simple.

Any ideas?
What about postgresql?  Is it stable enough and does it support large
databases?

Any help/directions would be appreciated.

Thanks,

Warren Rodie

PnP Solutions Pty. Ltd.

 
 
 

Linux Database for commercial project

Post by George Seato » Wed, 14 Apr 1999 04:00:00



> I have to set up a back end database for a web site.  I want to use linux to
> run the server and I need to select a database for it.

> I had been planning on using Oracle but we have just been quoted $30000
> (Aus) per CPU (We were thinking 2 cpus) and that seems maybe a bit
> expensive.

> Does anyone have any experience with other databases under linux (redhat)?

> We want this site to be very stable.
> The database size will probably be around 10+Gb but the structure itself
> will be relatively simple.

> Any ideas?
> What about postgresql?  Is it stable enough and does it support large
> databases?

I haven't used mySQL on RedHat yet but plan to soon, I'm currently using
it on Digital Unix. It would seem to be one candidate to investigate.
There seems to be a lot of support for it.

Cheers,

George Seaton.

 
 
 

Linux Database for commercial project

Post by Andrew C.R. Marti » Wed, 14 Apr 1999 04:00:00



> I have to set up a back end database for a web site.  I want to use linux to
> run the server and I need to select a database for it.

> I had been planning on using Oracle but we have just been quoted $30000
> (Aus) per CPU (We were thinking 2 cpus) and that seems maybe a bit
> expensive.

$30000?????? I have an Oracle price list in front of me and it says UKP230 per
user (or UKP1170 for Enterprise Edition). They don't quote per-CPU prices and
we were told that they do not do that - only a 10user (I think) licence where
you
*cannot* calculate how many users you have (i.e. Web applications). Note this
is always *concurrent* users.

I have used PostgreSQL quite a lot and think it's pretty good, but I'm not sure
I
would trust a whole company's large database to it (not that I have ever lost
any data with it).

Don't forget Informix, Sybase and DB/2 are all options for Linux as well now.

Andrew

 
 
 

Linux Database for commercial project

Post by Jose Santiag » Wed, 14 Apr 1999 04:00:00



> I have to set up a back end database for a web site.  I want to use linux to
> run the server and I need to select a database for it.

Try MySQL at http://www.mysql.com

--
Jose Santiago

Senior Systems Analyst - Scientific Systems
Komatsu Mining Systems - Peoria Operations
2300 N.E. Adams Street
P.O. Box 240
Peoria, IL 61650-0240

Voice:309-672-7325  Fax:309-672-7753

 
 
 

Linux Database for commercial project

Post by Mark Niels » Wed, 14 Apr 1999 04:00:00


Quote:>Does anyone have any experience with other databases under linux (redhat)?

How large of a database?
I use PostgreSQL and MySQL.
They work for me, but I don't have huge databases either.

Mark

--
Mark Nielsen            "Where 98 has no meaning."

The Computer Underground, Inc.  614-485-0506
computers, programming, networking, Perl, PHP, SQL, HTMl, Linux, Unix

 
 
 

Linux Database for commercial project

Post by pe.. » Wed, 14 Apr 1999 04:00:00



Quote:> Does anyone have any experience with other databases under linux (redhat)?

> We want this site to be very stable.
> The database size will probably be around 10+Gb but the structure itself
> will be relatively simple.

> Any ideas?
> What about postgresql?  Is it stable enough and does it support large
> databases?

I've played with many of the free SQL database tools (mSQL, MySQL, and
Postgress) and while they are very well suited for non-critical,
low-volume use they are not in any way suitable for stable, high
volume usage.

Of course, there is no substitute for experimentation, and since all
three products are free, I suggest you try each one out, populate the
database with some dummy data, and simulate an expected load.

Btw, you can also download free evaluation copies of both Sybase and
Oracle for comparison.  Furthermore, if I interpret the Linux license
of Sybase properly, it seems to be perfectly legal to use the
evaluation copy of Sybase under Linux even for installed commercial
applications.  You do not, however, get any support, and its use is at
your own risk.

-p.

 
 
 

Linux Database for commercial project

Post by Michael Pepple » Wed, 14 Apr 1999 04:00:00



> I have to set up a back end database for a web site.  I want to use linux to
> run the server and I need to select a database for it.

> I had been planning on using Oracle but we have just been quoted $30000
> (Aus) per CPU (We were thinking 2 cpus) and that seems maybe a bit
> expensive.

> Does anyone have any experience with other databases under linux (redhat)?

Do you have the RedHat 5.2 CDs?

If so you have Sybase 11.0.3.3 on the third CD.

Free.

Also for deployment.

It's not the latest Sybase release available on other platforms (that's 11.9.2/3),
but it's plenty good enough for what you have in mind, and commercial support as well
as the latest releases are in the pipeline.

Michael
--
Michael Peppler         -||-  Data Migrations Inc.

Int. Sybase User Group  -||-  http://www.isug.com

 
 
 

Linux Database for commercial project

Post by Scott Way » Wed, 14 Apr 1999 04:00:00


I think CA also port OpenIngres to Linux.
--
Scott 3-)
 
 
 

Linux Database for commercial project

Post by tjev.. » Thu, 15 Apr 1999 04:00:00


In no particular order:
IBM's DB2
Sybase
Oracle
Informix
All the above are free for evaluation purposes...

The free DBs are nice but don't give you the ability to have control
that you'll want on a 10GB database, i.e multiple devices, etc.
--
Tom Evans

 
 
 

Linux Database for commercial project

Post by Armando Orti » Thu, 15 Apr 1999 04:00:00



> In no particular order:
> IBM's DB2
> Sybase
> Oracle
> Informix
> All the above are free for evaluation purposes...

We use MySQL for Linux where I work...it crashes every so often, but
that's because someone went in and f****d up the entire database
structures...

Then again...you could always run Perl and make text CSV's... *snicker*

Armando

 
 
 

Linux Database for commercial project

Post by Warren Rodi » Fri, 16 Apr 1999 04:00:00


Thanks to everyone who answered.  We haven't made a decision yet, but at
least we have some more ideas.

Thanks,

Warren Rodie
PnP Solutions


>In no particular order:
>IBM's DB2
>Sybase
>Oracle
>Informix
>All the above are free for evaluation purposes...

>The free DBs are nice but don't give you the ability to have control
>that you'll want on a 10GB database, i.e multiple devices, etc.
>--
>Tom Evans

 
 
 

Linux Database for commercial project

Post by Blot » Fri, 16 Apr 1999 04:00:00


: Thanks to everyone who answered.  We haven't made a decision yet, but at
: least we have some more ideas.

: Thanks,

: Warren Rodie
: PnP Solutions

: >IBM's DB2
: >Sybase
: >Oracle
: >Informix

Perhaps, you could be the test site for postgres in a real-life
business system. I'm thinking that if you chose a commercial DBMS
such as those above, that whatever data is being written to them,
is simultaneously being written to the free Postgres SQL or MYsql.

As time goes by you could tell all of us whether the free ones
are as stable as the commercial ones. Of course you'd rely on
the commercial ones initially, but as your confidence picks up
in the free ones, you could got totally free.

It'd be nice to know the end results. Linux started based on
pessimism in a business environment, and now postgres sql now
needs to follow that same path.

--
        Mike,

 
 
 

Linux Database for commercial project

Post by Ernesto Hern├índez-Novic » Fri, 16 Apr 1999 04:00:00


: I have to set up a back end database for a web site.  I want to use linux to
: run the server and I need to select a database for it.

: I had been planning on using Oracle but we have just been quoted $30000
: (Aus) per CPU (We were thinking 2 cpus) and that seems maybe a bit
: expensive.

print reverse 'ORACLE';

ELCARO   (spanish for "The Expensive")

: Does anyone have any experience with other databases under linux (redhat)?

I've used PostgreSQL with excellent results for about 4Gb databases. Haven't
had the chance to use it on larger ones.
I've used Oracle and Informix on several Unices over the years. I find Informix
faster and much more stable by a long shot. Tried them on Linux, same thing.

Just my 11.70 Bs (about $0.02 :-)
--

Just another Unix/Perl/Java hacker running Linux 2.2.5
One thing is to be the most popular, and another is to be the best.
Unix: Live free or die! What would yo do without your freedom?

 
 
 

Linux Database for commercial project

Post by Warren Rodi » Sat, 17 Apr 1999 04:00:00


The current thinking is probably to go with mySQL initially, while the
database is a bit smaller.  As the database grows we then rethink the
decision and if necessary change to Oracle or some other commercial DBMS if
necessary.

Thanks,

Warren Rodie
PnP Solutions



>: Thanks to everyone who answered.  We haven't made a decision yet, but at
>: least we have some more ideas.

>: Thanks,

>: Warren Rodie
>: PnP Solutions

>: >IBM's DB2
>: >Sybase
>: >Oracle
>: >Informix

>Perhaps, you could be the test site for postgres in a real-life
>business system. I'm thinking that if you chose a commercial DBMS
>such as those above, that whatever data is being written to them,
>is simultaneously being written to the free Postgres SQL or MYsql.

>As time goes by you could tell all of us whether the free ones
>are as stable as the commercial ones. Of course you'd rely on
>the commercial ones initially, but as your confidence picks up
>in the free ones, you could got totally free.

>It'd be nice to know the end results. Linux started based on
>pessimism in a business environment, and now postgres sql now
>needs to follow that same path.

>--
> Mike,


 
 
 

Linux Database for commercial project

Post by Christopher B. Brow » Sat, 17 Apr 1999 04:00:00



Quote:>Perhaps, you could be the test site for postgres in a real-life
>business system. I'm thinking that if you chose a commercial DBMS
>such as those above, that whatever data is being written to them,
>is simultaneously being written to the free Postgres SQL or MYsql.

And really what this represents is a situation of decoupling the
application from the DBMS, probably by putting some form of middleware
in between your application and the DB.

Note that this sort of thing can be a wise move even if you're using a
"really a whole lot more robust" DB; the basic idea to make the use of
PostgreSQL supportable in a "high reliance" application is to add in
some transaction logging so that if the system falls down, you can go
back to the last full backup and apply all the changes that were
recorded in the transaction log.  (Oracle calls this sort of thing
"archive logs.")

The wisdom comes in when you log the transactions at the "higher level
logical transaction" level; this allows a more intelligent recovery
than you get out of something like Oracle's "archive logs," which just
plain record everything that happens, relevant to processing or not.

At any rate, the use of middleware in this manner can increase the
reliability of the system even if the database is somewhat fragile.

And it looks like a major new release of PostgreSQL is coming quite
soon; we'll see what that offers...

--
Those who do not understand Unix are condemned to reinvent it, poorly.  
-- Henry Spencer          <http://www.hex.net/~cbbrowne/lsf.html>