Terminals (sources of used terminals)

Terminals (sources of used terminals)

Post by Richard S. Shufor » Mon, 01 Feb 1999 04:00:00



At the instant enumerated as 19:53:04 GMT on 30 January A.D. 1999,


> i am also lookiing for some terminals to play around in linux with
> if there are any to be had for cheap please let me know.

The advent of Linux and other low-cost Unix variants has
rekindled interest, among computer tinkerers, in character-
cell serial video terminals.

One source of terminals that has been often overlooked is
Goodwill Industries.  This organization sometimes receives
donations of older data-processing equipment, which it then
offers for resale.

For example, last month I visited the Goodwill Industries
store in Leominster, Massachusetts (the town where Johnny
Appleseed was born).  Amidst other appliances and equipment,
I found two ASCII video terminals, a DEC VT185 and a Link MC-5.

The VT185 looked rather past its prime, but the Link terminal
appeared clean and usable, and I would have preferred it, anyway,
because it can emulate several types, including DEC VT220, VT100,
ADM-3A, TVI955, Wyse 60, and PCterm.  As of today, a description
from Wyse is still visible on the Web:

    http://www.wyse.com/terminal/specs/mc5spec.htm

In the Goodwill store, the MC-5's display was priced at $8 and
the EPC-type keyboard at $5, total $13 (U.S.).

(I didn't buy it, because this is the same terminal that Stratus
Computer--my employer--used to sell as the model V103, and I know
where to get one if I need one.)

Of course, Goodwill or similar organizations will not be able to
tell you whether or not a given terminal could be used with Linux.
So it will be your own responsibility to avoid EBCDIC-speaking
or otherwise incompatible terminal types.

Random archived terminal information may be seen from this URL:

    http://www.cs.utk.edu/~shuford/terminal_index.html

 ...Richard S. Shuford
    Stratus Computer, Inc.
    Americas Customer Service

--
Stratus Computer sells redundant-hardware fault-tolerant computer systems that
can run VOS, SVR4 FTX, or HP-UX.  For details, see  http://www.stratus.com/

 
 
 

Terminals (sources of used terminals)

Post by Bill Vermilli » Tue, 02 Feb 1999 04:00:00




Quote:>One source of terminals that has been often overlooked is
>Goodwill Industries.  This organization sometimes receives
>donations of older data-processing equipment, which it then
>offers for resale.
>Of course, Goodwill or similar organizations will not be able to
>tell you whether or not a given terminal could be used with Linux.
>So it will be your own responsibility to avoid EBCDIC-speaking
>or otherwise incompatible terminal types.

If you do go that route, be sure to take along an RS-232 tester and
see that at least the some of the lights light up.  Of course is
the receive portion is bad you still don't know without something
to connect.  One of the most common ailments I've seen in terminals
is the transceivers being blown.

On things such as Wyse, you can send the board away for about $50
and get it fixed, send the terminal for about $85 for the same,
take it to a local shop and pay from $100 to $150, or
OR
you can spend about $2 bucks for a pair of the chips, and replace
them - they are the last chips before the RS-232 connector.
Depends on how good you are at soldering - 15 to 30 minutes.

Bill
--


 
 
 

Terminals (sources of used terminals)

Post by Matthias Wark » Tue, 02 Feb 1999 04:00:00


It was the Sun, 31 Jan 1999 17:05:46 -0500...

> At the instant enumerated as 19:53:04 GMT on 30 January A.D. 1999,

> > i am also lookiing for some terminals to play around in linux with
> > if there are any to be had for cheap please let me know.

> The advent of Linux and other low-cost Unix variants has
> rekindled interest, among computer tinkerers, in character-
> cell serial video terminals.

Is there any shop still *making* them? What is the state of the art?

mawa
--

My Geek Code is no longer in my .signature. It's available on e-mail request.
It's sad to live in a world where knowing how to program your VCR actually
lowers your social status...

 
 
 

Terminals (sources of used terminals)

Post by Bob Rubenduns » Wed, 03 Feb 1999 04:00:00



> It was the Sun, 31 Jan 1999 17:05:46 -0500...

> > At the instant enumerated as 19:53:04 GMT on 30 January A.D. 1999,

> > > i am also lookiing for some terminals to play around in linux with
> > > if there are any to be had for cheap please let me know.
> > The advent of Linux and other low-cost Unix variants has
> > rekindled interest, among computer tinkerers, in character-
> > cell serial video terminals.

> Is there any shop still *making* them? What is the state of the art?

Sure. http://www.wyse.com/terminal/
I don't know about state of the art. Wyse terminals were always kinda
slow...

Most libraries I've visited in the last five years uses Wyse terminals
in their circulation departments. I'm sure a few will still use 'em in
2004...
--
-Bob Rubendunst
Soft Machines
Autolog Communications software for AIX, AMOS, DOS, Windows, and SCO
Unix
Phone: (217) 351-7199   Fax: (217) 351-2629
http://www.softm.com

 
 
 

Terminals (sources of used terminals)

Post by Bill Vermilli » Thu, 04 Feb 1999 04:00:00





>> It was the Sun, 31 Jan 1999 17:05:46 -0500... ..and Richard S.

>> > At the instant enumerated as 19:53:04 GMT on 30 January A.D.

>> > > ~ am also lookiing for some terminals to play around in linux
>> > > with if there are any to be had for cheap please let me know.
>> > The advent of Linux and other low-cost Unix variants has
>> > rekindled interest, among computer tinkerers, in character-
>> > cell serial video terminals.
>> Is there any shop still *making* them? What is the state of the
>> art?
>Sure. http://www.wyse.com/terminal/
>I don't know about state of the art. Wyse terminals were always
>kinda slow...

There's not a lot to be called state-of-the-art in terminals. :-)
Wyse terminals - depending on model - can be slow or fast.

The Wyse50 was always faster than the Wyse60.   The latter was much
like the former, but while stopping short of having a temrinal
emulation for every entry in the standard termcap file, the amount
of emulations and the options made it run far slower.   You don't
typically find bloatware burned into firmware.

The 160 was a pretty decent fast terminal.  It also will permit
two active sessions at one with it's 2 serial prots and 1 parallel
port.

One of the niftiest of the character terminals was the Link MC-10.
The concept was wonderful, the implementation was about the worst
of any I've seen.

One 'neat' feature is that you could cut and paste inside the
terminal.  By that I mean that if you logged onto one system, you
could postion the cursor and area to be cut, and then move to the
other terminal emulation and paste it into that session.  Made
moving things between differing systems easy.

However - avoid them at all costs.  I still have one in a box
packed away somewhere after it made at least two trips back to the
factory.

Link 5's are ok.  Last ones that I saw were $8 each with keyboard?

--

 
 
 

Terminals (sources of used terminals)

Post by Steve Wer » Fri, 05 Feb 1999 04:00:00


:
: One of the niftiest of the character terminals was the Link MC-10.
: The concept was wonderful, the implementation was about the worst
: of any I've seen.

I always like the MC line (except for the '80').  I thought the only
difference between a 5 and 10 was the fact that you could
add keyboard wedges (card swipers, bar-code readers, wands, etc).
At one point they had to expand BIOS code, and completely
get rid of the calendar and calculator, and the other utility (whatever
that was).

I've been using my MC-5 for about a decade now, but if I turn the contrast up
too high, it startes to wink and fade on me randomly.  Its the only
Link I've seen ever die a natural death.  It may be an MC-3, the
only difference being, what - the exclusion of the extra serial port for
switching between hosts?

The keyboards go for about $110 new, the terminal itself for about $160
or so from Ingram-Micro.  You get your choice of three different keyboards.
I always went with the EPC (AT) keyboards.  So for 8 bucks, I'd buy one
if you see it.  Link is now owned by Wyse or was always heavily affiliated
with them anyway.  When I had an occasion to take a keyboard apart, it
said Wyse all over the inside, and this way befvore Wyse really bought
them out.

What I'd *really* like is some way to use a Wyse or Link keyboard on
my PC's.  Good keyboards are impossible to find anymore, wyse
and link keyboards are everywhere though.  Anybody know how to do
it?  It generates scan-codes I beleive...  I contacted Wyse and they
said it was "impossible".

-sw

 
 
 

Terminals (sources of used terminals)

Post by Steven Blai » Fri, 12 Feb 1999 04:00:00



> What I'd *really* like is some way to use a Wyse or Link keyboard on
> my PC's.  Good keyboards are impossible to find anymore, wyse
> and link keyboards are everywhere though.  Anybody know how to do
> it?  It generates scan-codes I beleive...  I contacted Wyse and they
> said it was "impossible".

Steve,

Try looking at this URL. I have one and it is as good as my old Northgate
Omnikey.

http://www.monu-cad.com/keyboard.htm

Steve

 
 
 

1. Source of terminal information (was: Unique terminal on Ultra 2100)

Well, Bruce's 20-year-old memory is mostly helpful.

The H19 is similar to the VT52, which was a predecessor to the VT100.

However, you'll be disappointed if you expect the H19 to behave precisely
like a VT100;  because the H19 was actually designed before the VT100, it
implemented a different subset of the then-new ANSI X3.64 control set.

Some information about the H19 appears in this archival collection:

    http://www.cs.utk.edu/~shuford/terminal_index.html

You can also get a terminfo or termcap entry from the master database
kept as part of the "ncurses" project by Eric Raymond:

    http://www.ccil.org/terminfo/

Specific advice for setting up terminals on a Sun/Solaris platform can
be obtained from the Celestial source:

    http://www.stokely.com/stokely/unix.serial.port.resources/index.html

--
 ...Richard S. Shuford  | "It is not good to have zeal without knowledge,

 ...Info-Stratus contact|  Proverbs 19:2

    [ address fix: b --> d ]

2. exec, brk, sbrk, etc., traditional Unix memory management and Windows NT

3. Using the terminal (ttya) as a non terminal

4. STREAMS device driver for Solaris x86

5. bitkeeper cygwin messed up cygwin terminal setting for tcsh, lynx: dumb terminal?

6. Linux Trademark

7. Terminal Emulators/ Virtual Terminals

8. Keeping track of various users

9. I have problems with digiboards setup for terminal use with dec (xon/xoff) terminals

10. How do I write to the terminal of another process at another terminal?

11. Terminals/terminal server

12. SCO ANSI terminal vs. regular ANSI terminal

13. Terminal hangs when connecting from terminal server