Free English-English dictonary on linux

Free English-English dictonary on linux

Post by Dann » Sun, 05 Dec 1999 04:00:00



Hello...
I am looking for a free English-English dictonary for linux.
Where can I get  it?

Thank you for reading.

 
 
 

Free English-English dictonary on linux

Post by Jehs » Sun, 05 Dec 1999 04:00:00



> Hello...
> I am looking for a free English-English dictonary for linux.
> Where can I get  it?

I imagine an English-English dictionary would be pretty pointless,
as every english word's english equivalent is the original english
word itself :)

Seriously, what do you mean?

Moshe

--

ICQ 1900670 - 350467 GT Station - 6-0985 - HEF 214

 
 
 

Free English-English dictonary on linux

Post by John D » Sun, 05 Dec 1999 04:00:00




>> Hello...
>> I am looking for a free English-English dictonary for linux.
>> Where can I get  it?

>I imagine an English-English dictionary would be pretty pointless,
>as every english word's english equivalent is the original english
>word itself :)

English english as opposed to english french?

Could also mean British english?

>Seriously, what do you mean?

>Moshe

>--

>ICQ 1900670 - 350467 GT Station - 6-0985 - HEF 214

 
 
 

Free English-English dictonary on linux

Post by Bud Roger » Sun, 05 Dec 1999 04:00:00




> > Hello...
> > I am looking for a free English-English dictonary for linux.
> > Where can I get  it?

> I imagine an English-English dictionary would be pretty pointless,
> as every english word's english equivalent is the original english
> word itself :)

Oh no, there's British English and American English.  Two entirely
different languages.  The unwary are often deceived by their apparent
similarity.

--


 
 
 

Free English-English dictonary on linux

Post by Spik » Sun, 05 Dec 1999 04:00:00



Quote:> Oh no, there's British English and American English.  Two entirely
> different languages.  The unwary are often deceived by their apparent
> similarity.

Very true...
Kicking someone up the * is one of the more amusing differences.
(I'd love to see an English womans reaction to an american jokingly saying
she deserted one of them...

<EVIL GRIN>

--
______________________________________________________________________________

|    Andrew Halliwell BSc   |"The day Microsoft makes something that doesn't |
|             in            | suck is probably the day they start making     |
|      Computer Science     | vacuum cleaners" - Ernst Jan Plugge            |
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|GCv3.12 GCS>$ d-(dpu) s+/- a C++ US++ P L/L+ E-- W+ N++ o+ K PS+  w-- M+/++ |
|PS+++ PE- Y t+ 5++ X+/X++ R+ tv+ b+ DI+ D+ G e++ h/h+ !r!|  Space for hire  |
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Free English-English dictonary on linux

Post by Bill Unr » Sun, 05 Dec 1999 04:00:00



Quote:>Oh no, there's British English and American English.  Two entirely

And the Scots and Welsh would object to your calling that "British"
English, and the Canadians would object to your calling the other
"American". It is English english and US english.

Quote:>different languages.  The unwary are often deceived by their apparent
>similarity.

The unwary are also often deceived by the use of words describing geographic
entities. But the pedantic are only to eager to correct both types of
error.
 
 
 

Free English-English dictonary on linux

Post by Bill Unr » Sun, 05 Dec 1999 04:00:00



Quote:>Could also mean British english?

Uh, the Scots might object. No what he means is English-- as a
description of the people who inhabit the southern and eastern portion
of an Island mass off the coast of France-- English -- as a launguage
spoken by a large number of people scattered around the world (with a
loose association with the language originally spoken by the inhabitants
of that island, but also one which has diverged into a number of other
local dialects as well.) Ie, this is a reference to a specific dialect
(the English dialect) of that language(English).

ftp.ox.ac.uk has a wordlists directory, and somewhere under that is
Knoth's wordlist, which includes a set of words from English English.
The Unabridged dictionay words included in one of those lists is
unfortunately US English.

 
 
 

Free English-English dictonary on linux

Post by Bud Roger » Sun, 05 Dec 1999 04:00:00




> >Oh no, there's British English and American English.  Two entirely

> And the Scots and Welsh would object to your calling that "British"
> English, and the Canadians would object to your calling the other
> "American". It is English english and US english.

> >different languages.  The unwary are often deceived by their apparent
> >similarity.

> The unwary are also often deceived by the use of words describing geographic
> entities. But the pedantic are only to eager to correct both types of
> error.

Sorry.  A feeble attempt at humor, off the top of my head.  Sorry if I offend.

--


 
 
 

Free English-English dictonary on linux

Post by Philip Telli » Mon, 06 Dec 1999 04:00:00





> > >Oh no, there's British English and American English.  Two entirely

> > And the Scots and Welsh would object to your calling that "British"
> > English, and the Canadians would object to your calling the other
> > "American". It is English english and US english.

> > >different languages.  The unwary are often deceived by their apparent
> > >similarity.

> > The unwary are also often deceived by the use of words describing geographic
> > entities. But the pedantic are only to eager to correct both types of
> > error.

> Sorry.  A feeble attempt at humor, off the top of my head.  Sorry if I offend.

Well, jokes aside, is there anywhere I can get a British English word
list?  I am writing a word game, similar to the one in Jon Bentley's
Programming Pearls, and I need a British / UK English word list.

Philip

 
 
 

Free English-English dictonary on linux

Post by Spik » Mon, 06 Dec 1999 04:00:00



Quote:> Well, jokes aside, is there anywhere I can get a British English word
> list?  I am writing a word game, similar to the one in Jon Bentley's
> Programming Pearls, and I need a British / UK English word list.

There should be one in most distros, surely?
SuSE has. I know that anyway.

--
______________________________________________________________________________

|    Andrew Halliwell BSc   | "ARSE! GERLS!! DRINK! DRINK! DRINK!!!"         |
|             in            | "THAT WOULD BE AN ECUMENICAL MATTER!...FECK!!!!|
|      Computer Science     | - Father Jack in "Father Ted"                  |
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|GCv3.12 GCS>$ d-(dpu) s+/- a C++ US++ P L/L+ E-- W+ N++ o+ K PS+  w-- M+/++ |
|PS+++ PE- Y t+ 5++ X+/X++ R+ tv+ b+ DI+ D+ G e++ h/h+ !r!|  Space for hire  |
------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 
 
 

Free English-English dictonary on linux

Post by cmart.. » Mon, 06 Dec 1999 04:00:00




> >Oh no, there's British English and American English.  Two entirely

> And the Scots and Welsh would object to your calling that "British"
> English, and the Canadians would object to your calling the other
> "American". It is English english and US english.

> >different languages.  The unwary are often deceived by their apparent
> >similarity.

> The unwary are also often deceived by the use of words describing geographic
> entities. But the pedantic are only to eager to correct both types of
> error.

And the even more pedantic will point out that you meant "too eager".
 
 
 

Free English-English dictonary on linux

Post by Bill Unr » Mon, 06 Dec 1999 04:00:00



>> entities. But the pedantic are only to eager to correct both types of
>> error.
>And the even more pedantic will point out that you meant "too eager".

And not only the pendantic. I hang my head in shame and self loathing.
Excuses about typing too fast just won't wash.
 
 
 

Free English-English dictonary on linux

Post by Peter T. Breue » Mon, 06 Dec 1999 04:00:00



:>> entities. But the pedantic are only to eager to correct both types of
:>> error.

:>And the even more pedantic will point out that you meant "too eager".

: And not only the pendantic. I hang my head in shame and self loathing.
: Excuses about typing too fast just won't wash.

You probably meant to write "insufficiently lazy".

Peter

 
 
 

Free English-English dictonary on linux

Post by Bill Unr » Mon, 06 Dec 1999 04:00:00



Quote:>Well, jokes aside, is there anywhere I can get a British English word
>list?  I am writing a word game, similar to the one in Jon Bentley's
>Programming Pearls, and I need a British / UK English word list.

As I said, ftp.ox.ax.uk/pub/wordlists/dictionaries/knuth_british.gz
whic is an addendum to his knuth_words.gz or english words which differ.
Alternatively, you could always download the complete Shakespeare and do
a
sort -u
on that "list" to get a  list of genuine English english words. (I
was told the other day that there are about 30,000, which is a huge
number for any one writer to use.)
Of course the OED has I think over 1 million words, but I do not think
that they have ever put out their wordlist.
 
 
 

Free English-English dictonary on linux

Post by Stephen Grund » Tue, 07 Dec 1999 04:00:00



Quote:>>Oh no, there's British English and American English.  Two entirely

>And the Scots and Welsh would object to your calling that "British"
>English, and the Canadians would object to your calling the other
>"American". It is English english and US english.

Ack!  There is English (a.k.a. The Queen's/King's English) and several
bastardisations, one of which is US English (as well as Straun).
At least, that is the Aussie view. ;)

Quote:>>different languages.  The unwary are often deceived by their apparent
>>similarity.

>The unwary are also often deceived by the use of words describing geographic
>entities. But the pedantic are only to eager to correct both types of
>error.

The more pedantic pick up on spelling mistakes (cf. `too'). ;)

--