Moving from Win_Doze to Linux

Moving from Win_Doze to Linux

Post by Axel Dav » Tue, 16 Oct 2001 04:04:27



Hi All,

I am thinking of deploying a Linux server for my 100% windows network.

How much of typing is required if you deploy a Linux server.  I know
that this should be not be the only deciding factor, but I really
really suck at typing.

I have heard of X windows in Linux, can these be used while using
mission critical applications. So for instance: I am planning to use
Checkpoint firewall on Linux platform for my network.  How much more
typing would the Linux Platform involve versus if I were to deploy
Checkpoint on Windows platform.

Would I have to type just 4-5 extra lines of command each day or is it
substantially more.

Any help will be greatly appreciated.

Thanks

Axel

 
 
 

Moving from Win_Doze to Linux

Post by Michael Heimin » Tue, 16 Oct 2001 04:33:26



21:04:

Quote:> Hi All,

> I am thinking of deploying a Linux server for my 100% windows
> network.

> How much of typing is required if you deploy a Linux server.  I know
> that this should be not be the only deciding factor, but I really
> really suck at typing.

You managed to type this post, or did you use some kind of speech
recognition system....;-)

Quote:> I have heard of X windows in Linux, can these be used while using
> mission critical applications. So for instance: I am planning to use
> Checkpoint firewall on Linux platform for my network.  How much more
> typing would the Linux Platform involve versus if I were to deploy
> Checkpoint on Windows platform.

You shouldn't run anything more than necessary on a firewall, however
the management GUI for checkpoint fw1 just runs on M$, there is no
Linux versions (AFAIK).

Michael Heiming

 
 
 

Moving from Win_Doze to Linux

Post by Markku Kolkk » Tue, 16 Oct 2001 04:35:38



> Would I have to type just 4-5 extra lines of command each day or is it
> substantially more.

Each day? Typically you set up a Linux system once and then leave it
alone. It can run months without any commands necessary. If
administration is needed you can use GUI tools like Webmin.

--
        Markku Kolkka

 
 
 

Moving from Win_Doze to Linux

Post by Tony Lawrenc » Tue, 16 Oct 2001 05:00:18



> Hi All,

> I am thinking of deploying a Linux server for my 100% windows network.

> How much of typing is required if you deploy a Linux server.  I know
> that this should be not be the only deciding factor, but I really
> really suck at typing.

> I have heard of X windows in Linux, can these be used while using
> mission critical applications. So for instance: I am planning to use
> Checkpoint firewall on Linux platform for my network.  How much more
> typing would the Linux Platform involve versus if I were to deploy
> Checkpoint on Windows platform.

> Would I have to type just 4-5 extra lines of command each day or is it
> substantially more.

What are you going to be doing with it?

If it's just a firewall, you ordinarily wouldn't be doing much but
looking at the logs to be sure that you are still secure, etc.

--
Tony Lawrence
SCO/Linux Support Tips, How-To's, Tests and more: http://pcunix.com

 
 
 

Moving from Win_Doze to Linux

Post by Robert Helle » Tue, 16 Oct 2001 05:40:27



  In a message on 14 Oct 2001 12:04:27 -0700, wrote :

AD> Hi All,
AD>
AD> I am thinking of deploying a Linux server for my 100% windows network.
AD>
AD> How much of typing is required if you deploy a Linux server.  I know
AD> that this should be not be the only deciding factor, but I really
AD> really suck at typing.
AD>
AD> I have heard of X windows in Linux, can these be used while using
AD> mission critical applications. So for instance: I am planning to use
AD> Checkpoint firewall on Linux platform for my network.  How much more
AD> typing would the Linux Platform involve versus if I were to deploy
AD> Checkpoint on Windows platform.
AD>
AD> Would I have to type just 4-5 extra lines of command each day or is it
AD> substantially more.

You'd type 5-10 extra lines of command line when you start out (to
configure things), then basically nothing for weeks or months.  so
maybe it would *average* maybe 4-5 *characters* per day.

As compared to several dozen mouse clicks though dozens of menus and
dialog boxes -- that is the 5-10 lines of typing would be replaced but
an equal amount of pointing and clicking.  Contrary to popular opinion,
pointing and clicking is not *inheirently* easier than using the
keyboard.  Pointing and clicking is not suffientent alone -- you *still*
have to type *some* stuff (like machine name, IP addresses, usernames
passwords, and so on).  With a point and click interface you *also* need
to move your hand from the keyboard and move the mouse arround from time
to time.

I am sure that I suck even worse at typing than you do, and have only
used Linux servers.  Both bash and tcsh (the two main shells available
on Linux boxes) have a bunch of keyboard accelerator features.  The CLI
editing keys (arrow keys) are quite useful.  You can recall similar
command lines and re-cycle them with minor modifications, with only a
*small* amount of actual raw typing.  So those 5-10 command lines might
only have 3-4 *unique* (freshly typed) command lines and the rest will
likely be minor variations: press up arrow, press left / right arrow,
change 2-3 characters here and there and press return.  Half a dozen
keystrokes and you've fired off a whole 'nother command line.

Do not fear the keyboard -- it will allways be much more of a friend
than that silly plastic dingus over there to the side of your work
area.

You don't really want the X server running on your firewall (or any
other 'server' system). It is a massive waste of resources.

AD>
AD> Any help will be greatly appreciated.
AD>
AD> Thanks
AD>
AD> Axel
AD>                                                                                                              

--
                                     \/


http://www.deepsoft.com              /\FidoNet:    1:321/153

 
 
 

Moving from Win_Doze to Linux

Post by Axel Dav » Wed, 17 Oct 2001 00:09:29


Thanks Tony.


> > Hi All,

> > I am thinking of deploying a Linux server for my 100% windows network.

> > How much of typing is required if you deploy a Linux server.  I know
> > that this should be not be the only deciding factor, but I really
> > really suck at typing.

> > I have heard of X windows in Linux, can these be used while using
> > mission critical applications. So for instance: I am planning to use
> > Checkpoint firewall on Linux platform for my network.  How much more
> > typing would the Linux Platform involve versus if I were to deploy
> > Checkpoint on Windows platform.

> > Would I have to type just 4-5 extra lines of command each day or is it
> > substantially more.

> What are you going to be doing with it?

> If it's just a firewall, you ordinarily wouldn't be doing much but
> looking at the logs to be sure that you are still secure, etc.

 
 
 

Moving from Win_Doze to Linux

Post by Axel Dav » Wed, 17 Oct 2001 00:49:11


Thanks a lot Michael, Markku, Tony and Robert. Appreciate your help.
Robert, you seem to abhor typing as much as I do.  I will try to
follow your tips.

Michael this post was a result of my hunt and peck efforts:)  I do not
use any speech recognition software yet, did try Dragon Systems voice
recognition once, but then they went under I think.

I have one more question guys. I might use a Sun Solaris box first and
then get another Linux server. How much of knowledge overlap is there
between Solaris and Red Hat Linux.

So in other words will there be a lot of relearning of commands and
concepts. Or is it that most of the Solaris concepts can be used for
Linux.

Thanks.

Axel.



>   In a message on 14 Oct 2001 12:04:27 -0700, wrote :

> AD> Hi All,
> AD>
> AD> I am thinking of deploying a Linux server for my 100% windows network.
> AD>
> AD> How much of typing is required if you deploy a Linux server.  I know
> AD> that this should be not be the only deciding factor, but I really
> AD> really suck at typing.
> AD>
> AD> I have heard of X windows in Linux, can these be used while using
> AD> mission critical applications. So for instance: I am planning to use
> AD> Checkpoint firewall on Linux platform for my network.  How much more
> AD> typing would the Linux Platform involve versus if I were to deploy
> AD> Checkpoint on Windows platform.
> AD>
> AD> Would I have to type just 4-5 extra lines of command each day or is it
> AD> substantially more.

> You'd type 5-10 extra lines of command line when you start out (to
> configure things), then basically nothing for weeks or months.  so
> maybe it would *average* maybe 4-5 *characters* per day.

> As compared to several dozen mouse clicks though dozens of menus and
> dialog boxes -- that is the 5-10 lines of typing would be replaced but
> an equal amount of pointing and clicking.  Contrary to popular opinion,
> pointing and clicking is not *inheirently* easier than using the
> keyboard.  Pointing and clicking is not suffientent alone -- you *still*
> have to type *some* stuff (like machine name, IP addresses, usernames
> passwords, and so on).  With a point and click interface you *also* need
> to move your hand from the keyboard and move the mouse arround from time
> to time.

> I am sure that I suck even worse at typing than you do, and have only
> used Linux servers.  Both bash and tcsh (the two main shells available
> on Linux boxes) have a bunch of keyboard accelerator features.  The CLI
> editing keys (arrow keys) are quite useful.  You can recall similar
> command lines and re-cycle them with minor modifications, with only a
> *small* amount of actual raw typing.  So those 5-10 command lines might
> only have 3-4 *unique* (freshly typed) command lines and the rest will
> likely be minor variations: press up arrow, press left / right arrow,
> change 2-3 characters here and there and press return.  Half a dozen
> keystrokes and you've fired off a whole 'nother command line.

> Do not fear the keyboard -- it will allways be much more of a friend
> than that silly plastic dingus over there to the side of your work
> area.

> You don't really want the X server running on your firewall (or any
> other 'server' system). It is a massive waste of resources.

> AD>
> AD> Any help will be greatly appreciated.
> AD>
> AD> Thanks
> AD>
> AD> Axel
> AD>

 
 
 

Moving from Win_Doze to Linux

Post by Tony Lawrenc » Wed, 17 Oct 2001 02:18:05



> I have one more question guys. I might use a Sun Solaris box first and
> then get another Linux server. How much of knowledge overlap is there
> between Solaris and Red Hat Linux.

> So in other words will there be a lot of relearning of commands and
> concepts. Or is it that most of the Solaris concepts can be used for
> Linux.

Umm..

I have experience with BSD and Sys V Unices going back to 1981.  At one
time I was Solaris Enterprise Certified, have been SCO ACE certified,
Microsoft MCSE etc.-and I've earned my living almost exclusively in Unix
since 1981; in other words, I have a little bit of computer experience
:-)

Recently I converted my personal desktop machine to Red Hat (
http://pcunix.com/Linux/switch.html ).  Linux is "familiar", but
different- I find it clumsy (not Linux'ss fault- it's MY habits that
cause it) and often confusing.  On the other hand, I'nm sure that
without the background I have, it would be much more incomprehensible.

I did a small article a while back on the differences between SCO and
Linux- SCO is Sys V'ish, so it tells part of the difference twixt Linux
and Solaris- or at least the TYPES of things that are different though
of course not all: http://pcunix.com/Linux/scolindiff.html

Generally, user level stuff is pretty much the same- it's admin commands
and concepts that diverge widely.

--
Tony Lawrence
SCO/Linux Support Tips, How-To's, Tests and more: http://pcunix.com

 
 
 

Moving from Win_Doze to Linux

Post by Axel Dav » Wed, 17 Oct 2001 07:19:00




> > I have one more question guys. I might use a Sun Solaris box first and
> > then get another Linux server. How much of knowledge overlap is there
> > between Solaris and Red Hat Linux.

> > So in other words will there be a lot of relearning of commands and
> > concepts. Or is it that most of the Solaris concepts can be used for
> > Linux.

> Umm..

> I have experience with BSD and Sys V Unices going back to 1981.  At one
> time I was Solaris Enterprise Certified, have been SCO ACE certified,
> Microsoft MCSE etc.-and I've earned my living almost exclusively in Unix
> since 1981; in other words, I have a little bit of computer experience
> :-)

> Recently I converted my personal desktop machine to Red Hat (
> http://pcunix.com/Linux/switch.html ).  Linux is "familiar", but
> different- I find it clumsy (not Linux'ss fault- it's MY habits that
> cause it) and often confusing.  On the other hand, I'nm sure that
> without the background I have, it would be much more incomprehensible.

> I did a small article a while back on the differences between SCO and
> Linux- SCO is Sys V'ish, so it tells part of the difference twixt Linux
> and Solaris- or at least the TYPES of things that are different though
> of course not all: http://pcunix.com/Linux/scolindiff.html

> Generally, user level stuff is pretty much the same- it's admin commands
> and concepts that diverge widely.

Thanks for the post and the helpful website Tony.

Axel

 
 
 

Moving from Win_Doze to Linux

Post by pl.. » Fri, 30 Nov 2001 22:26:29



Quote:> Hi All,

> I am thinking of deploying a Linux server for my 100% windows network.

> How much of typing is required if you deploy a Linux server.  I know
> that this should be not be the only deciding factor, but I really
> really suck at typing.

> I have heard of X windows in Linux, can these be used while using
> mission critical applications. So for instance: I am planning to use
> Checkpoint firewall on Linux platform for my network.  How much more
> typing would the Linux Platform involve versus if I were to deploy
> Checkpoint on Windows platform.

> Would I have to type just 4-5 extra lines of command each day or is it
> substantially more.

> Any help will be greatly appreciated.

You have got it all wrong.

You see, Linux admins do not type much at all. Early in the learning
curve they start to learn Perl and BASH scripting. After a few months
of pure pleasure everything of any value is scripted and they sit by
the beach drinking beer and reading USENET while their servants pass
them delicious food and women whisper tender thoughts in their ears.

Once every month or so, the pager goes off to tell them that someone
tried to get past the firewall but failed - again. Their Linux box
immediately discerned the source and sent back a 100 box flood and
emails to all admins in their traceroute.

Bye, bye sucker. Yawn.

The good thing about Linux is that you get to have a life and work
remotely while others madly go from box to box manually clicking on
menus and modal dialog boxes.

With Linux, everything is automated. Most admins look after 1000 boxes
from one desk while they drink coke and coffee.

Yawn.

Half the day and nothing to do! Gees, I think I will buy a few Win
boxes just to give me something to do for a change.

 
 
 

Moving from Win_Doze to Linux

Post by Agathocles, Tyrant of Syracus » Fri, 30 Nov 2001 19:28:58




> > Hi All,

> > I am thinking of deploying a Linux server for my 100% windows network.

> > How much of typing is required if you deploy a Linux server.  I know
> > that this should be not be the only deciding factor, but I really
> > really suck at typing.

> > I have heard of X windows in Linux, can these be used while using
> > mission critical applications. So for instance: I am planning to use
> > Checkpoint firewall on Linux platform for my network.  How much more
> > typing would the Linux Platform involve versus if I were to deploy
> > Checkpoint on Windows platform.

> > Would I have to type just 4-5 extra lines of command each day or is it
> > substantially more.

> > Any help will be greatly appreciated.

> You have got it all wrong.

> You see, Linux admins do not type much at all. Early in the learning
> curve they start to learn Perl and BASH scripting. After a few months
> of pure pleasure everything of any value is scripted and they sit by
> the beach drinking beer and reading USENET while their servants pass
> them delicious food and women whisper tender thoughts in their ears.

Yum yum. You got some motivational skills here <g>.
 
 
 

1. Windows 2000 NOT moving into the household moving business

By Todd Weiss
APRIL 10, 2003

The software development division of household moving company All-American
Moving Group LLC is building a SuSE Linux-based moving and storage
application that it will sell later this year to bring open-source choices
to the industry.

Assimilation Technologies, the Norfolk, Va.-based software division of
All-American, is creating the application and other Linux-based software
for internal use and to market to moving companies in response to changes
in the IT marketplace, said Dave Pekol, a general partner at Assimilation.

All-American, which is the largest moving agent under the Mayflower Transit
LLC banner, settled on Linux last year as it sought cheaper alternatives to
rising licensing costs for Microsoft Corp.'s Windows 2000 server operating
system, Pekol said. The company was also worried about security issues with
Windows NT and 2000. "Windows NT servers are constantly being hacked, so we
were very concerned about customer data," Pekol said.

In addition to the complete software application it's building for the
moving industry, Assimilation is also at work on an internal portal
application for All-American that will allow clients to log in for billing
and other information, he said. The portal is expected to be ready by the
end of the month.

"We were looking for a secure, reliable way to go paperless," Pekol said.
"With SuSE Linux and the applications that work in it, we're very close to
accomplishing that." All-American is running SuSE Linux Enterprise Server 8
on a second partition on an IBM iSeries server (formerly called the
AS/400), alongside the main OS/400 partition. The configuration allows
Assimilation to develop applications under SuSE and then transfer them to
other systems, using a virtual LAN pipeline in the network.

"It gave us a nice, friendly and easy environment to work in," while
maintaining the high 99.9% reliability of the OS/400 environment, he said.
SuSE was installed into the network in January after an earlier experiment
with Red Hat 7.1, which had problems dealing with large outputs, Pekol said.

The OS/400 and SuSE systems work seamlessly with All-American's mainframe
in the company's Memphis-based headquarters by sending the data to the
OS/400 side and moving it into the Linux side using the virtual LAN.

The new moving and storage application will be built for customers using
the same combination of platforms, so they can plug it in and move to
Linux, Pekol said. "We're offering a Microsoft-free solution [where] they
can take our product or develop it further if they wish" in open-source
projects, he said.

2. conflicting messages from Solaris2.5 lpstat

3. Secret Basketball Moves (New Moves 11)

4. middle mouse button?

5. '.forward' moves mail !!!; anything that copies and not MOVE?

6. Using PPP - callback or using DIP

7. ATI GUPro bus mouse move up, cursor moves down (in X)

8. Dual Modem Support

9. linux/zutil.h needs to move to include/linux

10. Moving Linux to a new Hard Drive

11. Linux will not allow me to move files over via FTP?

12. linux works great, now i want to MOVE it to a NEW HARD DRIVE????

13. Linux reboots when mouse moves