how to copy files from dos partition to linux

how to copy files from dos partition to linux

Post by Sushil Draveka » Thu, 10 Aug 2000 04:00:00



I've a windows98/linux partition on my pc and need help to find out how
to copy files from windows file system to linux.

thanks in advance,
sushil

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how to copy files from dos partition to linux

Post by Peter Mitchel » Thu, 10 Aug 2000 04:00:00


Assuming you have a reasonably recent distribution of Linux,
it supports reading and writing DOS/Windows disks. Many
distributions will set up any DOS or Windows partitions dna
automatically mount them in the Linux filesystem. If not,
then

Create a directory, say dosc, to mount the DOS partition in
with

mkdir /dosc

Mount the Windows partition (assumed here to be the first
partition - hda1) with

mount -tvfat /dev/hda1 /dosc

Now you can use cp or your favorite file manager to copy to
your heart's content.

Incidentally type vfat is FAT32 (probably needed for the
Win98 partition), type msdos is FAT16 or FAT12.

Good luck

Peter

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how to copy files from dos partition to linux

Post by Robert Helle » Thu, 10 Aug 2000 04:00:00



  In a message on Wed, 09 Aug 2000 20:46:09 GMT, wrote :

SD> I've a windows98/linux partition on my pc and need help to find out how
SD> to copy files from windows file system to linux.

Add a line like:

/dev/hda1               /WinC                    vfat   umask=000        0 0

To your /etc/fstab file, create the mount point and issue a mount
command 'mount /WinC' (only need to do this manually the first time --
this will happen automagically at every reboot from now on).

Now your entire C: drive is available under /WinC/.

SD>
SD> thanks in advance,
SD> sushil
SD>
SD>
SD> Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
SD> Before you buy.
SD>                

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how to copy files from dos partition to linux

Post by Dances With Cro » Thu, 10 Aug 2000 04:00:00



>Assuming you have a reasonably recent distribution of Linux,
>it supports reading and writing DOS/Windows disks. Many

Yep, FAT support has been around almost since the beginning, and VFAT
support since at least 1.7 years, probably more.

[snip of useful, mostly correct advice]

Quote:>Incidentally type vfat is FAT32 (probably needed for the
>Win98 partition), type msdos is FAT16 or FAT12.

Not quite.  "msdos" support includes FAT32 now, or at least I can mount
a 3.5G FAT32 partition as type msdos.  VFAT refers to the somewhat
inelegant hack that MS used to support long filenames without breaking
backwards compatability with 8+3, and it is used on FAT32, FAT16, and
FAT12 these days AFAICT.

--
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http://www.brainbench.com     /    than freedom.
-----------------------------/              --Charles Peguy

 
 
 

how to copy files from dos partition to linux

Post by DeAnn Iw » Thu, 10 Aug 2000 04:00:00


On Wed, 09 Aug 2000 20:46:09 GMT, Sushil Dravekar


>I've a windows98/linux partition on my pc and need help to find out how
>to copy files from windows file system to linux.

>thanks in advance,
>sushil

    You can read your files from linux.  You need to mount your
dos/fat partition in linux.  If you want to do this "permanently" so
the dos partition is always available to read, you can add the dos
partitions to the file system table /etc/fstab.  If you just want to
mount the dos partitions occasionally, you can mount them manually
with mount (man mount, if you need more information).  If you want to
put the dos files in an ext2 partition, you can copy them normally,
like any other file readable by linux.  Note that permissions work a
bit differently on dos files (since it does not have inherent
permissions).  One uses "umask", if I recall correctly (I don't set
this up often, and it's been a while).