Remote editor for Win-95/98/NT and MacOS clients?

Remote editor for Win-95/98/NT and MacOS clients?

Post by Gerald Willman » Thu, 18 Nov 1999 04:00:00




> Some users of my Linux system need to edit small ASCII files such as
> .qmail or maybe .procmail and very simple HTML.
> Most of them have a Telnet or SSH client with vt100 emulation.
> On some vt100 emulators, the cursor arrow keys don't work.

have you considered not using an editor at all. Bash should be enough for
example to put a new forwarding address into .qmail
                                                          Gerald

--

 
 
 

Remote editor for Win-95/98/NT and MacOS clients?

Post by Cameron L. Spitz » Fri, 19 Nov 1999 04:00:00


Some users of my Linux system need to edit small ASCII files such as
.qmail or maybe .procmail and very simple HTML.
Most of them have a Telnet or SSH client with vt100 emulation.
On some vt100 emulators, the cursor arrow keys don't work.

What's the best editor for them to use?  We've been using Andrew's Editor
(ae(1)) after bad experiences with Pico and cursor keys.
It works, but it takes a little figuring out.

Alternately, what editors came with their systems that are actually usable?
Long ago, MacOS came with a thing called "Teachtext"
and MS-Windows came with a "Notepad," but these tools are either
retired or have been gussied up so much that they are no longer
text editors.

I had one user quit in frustration after copying a
tiny HTML file to her PC and trying to edit it with Notepad, only
to have Notepad go into some "user friendly" HTML WYSIWYG mode.
Apparently the current versions won't let you edit HTML as plain
text if the name ends in .htm or .html.  (Is there a way to disable
this "feature?")

I'm looking for ease of learning and broad compatibility, not features
for the advanced programmer.  I don't have a Microsoft system or a Mac
to experiment on, and most of my users are not in a position to
install new software.

Cameron

 
 
 

Remote editor for Win-95/98/NT and MacOS clients?

Post by Lee Prior Collie » Fri, 19 Nov 1999 04:00:00


<SNIP>
Quote:> I had one user quit in frustration after copying a
> tiny HTML file to her PC and trying to edit it with Notepad, only
> to have Notepad go into some "user friendly" HTML WYSIWYG mode.
> Apparently the current versions won't let you edit HTML as plain
> text if the name ends in .htm or .html.  (Is there a way to disable
> this "feature?")

<SNIP>

Windows does still come with notepad (I'm not sure about Win2000) which is
still a text-only editor with no other features.  Win 9x and NT4 also come
with a small app called 'wordpad' which will try to do WYSIWYG, and is
probably the default editor when an html file is clicked on.  You could tell
your windows users to do START > RUN > notepad > OK to load notepad, or
right-click on desktop, NEW > SHORTCUT > notepad > ENTER > ENTER to create a
shortcut.  It is also available from the accessories program group assuming
the defaults haven't been messed around with.

Lee Collier

 
 
 

Remote editor for Win-95/98/NT and MacOS clients?

Post by Guillermo Labatt » Fri, 19 Nov 1999 04:00:00


Have a look at MEdit ( http://www.imranweb.com/freesoft )

This is a text editor that runs on Windows. It has all the features of Notepad
plus many others (like syntax highlighting).

One of its unique features is its ability to access files on a remote host
using a FTP connection.
Users are able to browse the files on the remote host and when they want to
edit a particular file they just double-click on it. MEdit automatically
transfer the file from the remote host to the temporary folder in the local
disk. The user can edit the file and when he or she  decides to save it, MEdit
transfers it back to the remote host. From the user's point of view, there's
almost no difference between editing a file in the remote host or the local
disk.

But the best part is that this program consists of a single '.exe' file that
fits in a single floppy. No installation process is required. You just drag an
drop the '.exe' from the floppy to the Windows' destktop, double click on the
icon and you got MEdit running.

I'm a teacher and I wanted my students to edit files in a Linux box. They were
connecting to the unix box from windows clients using telnet. I'm a vi freak so
I couldn't see any problem with that. However, none of my students liked the
idea of using a linux text editor, especially because the terminal emulation of
the telnet client that comes with Windows is so bad that most keys don't work
properly (with decent terminal emulation almost any DOS/Windows user feels
comfortable with mcedit).

The solution was setting up a web page in the Linux box where users could
download MEdit. In the web page I provided a link to a copy of  the 'medit.exe'
directly, not a '.zip' file. When the browser asked 'execute the file or save
to disk?' some students answered 'execute' and MEdit starded working
inmediately.

I think this is a great program and I wish there were more software like this:
very useful but at the same time small and simple.


> Some users of my Linux system need to edit small ASCII files such as
> .qmail or maybe .procmail and very simple HTML.
> Most of them have a Telnet or SSH client with vt100 emulation.
> On some vt100 emulators, the cursor arrow keys don't work.

> What's the best editor for them to use?  We've been using Andrew's Editor
> (ae(1)) after bad experiences with Pico and cursor keys.
> It works, but it takes a little figuring out.

> Alternately, what editors came with their systems that are actually usable?
> Long ago, MacOS came with a thing called "Teachtext"
> and MS-Windows came with a "Notepad," but these tools are either
> retired or have been gussied up so much that they are no longer
> text editors.

> I had one user quit in frustration after copying a
> tiny HTML file to her PC and trying to edit it with Notepad, only
> to have Notepad go into some "user friendly" HTML WYSIWYG mode.
> Apparently the current versions won't let you edit HTML as plain
> text if the name ends in .htm or .html.  (Is there a way to disable
> this "feature?")

> I'm looking for ease of learning and broad compatibility, not features
> for the advanced programmer.  I don't have a Microsoft system or a Mac
> to experiment on, and most of my users are not in a position to
> install new software.

> Cameron