Partitions

Partitions

Post by tbeld.. » Fri, 27 Dec 1996 04:00:00



I have a WIN95 machine with a 1.2 GIG hard drive on it and I am about to
put in another 3.0 GIG hard drive (keeping the 1.2 GIG)...I am wanting to
install Linux so I thought I would make a 1.5 DOS partition on the new
one and then use the remaining 1.5 GIG as a Linux partition...can anyone
see any potential problems with this....thanks.

 
 
 

Partitions

Post by Steve Vandive » Fri, 27 Dec 1996 04:00:00



> I have a WIN95 machine with a 1.2 GIG hard drive on it and I am about to
> put in another 3.0 GIG hard drive (keeping the 1.2 GIG)...I am wanting to
> install Linux so I thought I would make a 1.5 DOS partition on the new
> one and then use the remaining 1.5 GIG as a Linux partition...can anyone
> see any potential problems with this....thanks.

Unix sys including Linux require that the boot partition be inclusive
of 0-1023 other that that put it anywhere in any size
..

--
      /_/_/_/   Steve 'Buxx' Vandiver Billings, Mo, USA  

    _/_/_/    _/   _/  _/ _/  _/ _/  "Find out what you
   _/   _/  _/   _/    _/     _/    don't do well, then
 /_/_/_/   _/_/_/   _/ _/  _/ _/   don't do it"  -  Alf

 
 
 

Partitions

Post by Rod Smi » Sat, 28 Dec 1996 04:00:00




Quote:>I have a WIN95 machine with a 1.2 GIG hard drive on it and I am about to
>put in another 3.0 GIG hard drive (keeping the 1.2 GIG)...I am wanting to
>install Linux so I thought I would make a 1.5 DOS partition on the new
>one and then use the remaining 1.5 GIG as a Linux partition...can anyone
>see any potential problems with this....thanks.

Yes:  A 1.5GB FAT partition will use 32kB allocation blocks, meaning that
you'll waste an average of 16kB for every file you store on the disk.
That'll come out to ~1/3 of the disk's space by the time it's full,
assuming typical file sizes.  Now, if you've the latest Win95 updates and
use FAT-32, this won't be an issue; but then you'll also be sacrificing
compatibility with older DOS floppy boots, Linux, etc. (though I hear
Linux FAT-32 drivers are in the works).  For that matter, you've got the
same problem now if you have the 1.2GB drive set up as a single partition.

I'd recommend splitting that new drive into at least six FAT partitions
and the 1.5GB Linux partition (Linux's ext2fs doesn't suffer from the
limits I just outlined for FAT), to keep the FAT partitions under 256MB
(allocation block sizes start at 2kB for partitions of less than 128MB and
double with every doubling of partition size, so 255MB is the maximum I
recommend in most cases).

As to the Linux side of things, Linux will boot fine like this.  You may
want to devote a small partition (10-100MB, depending upon how much RAM
you've got and how many programs you expect to be running under Linux) to
a Linux swap partition.  Some people also like to split up their Linux
drive space into multiple partitions in order to improve robustness in
case of a system crash (say, if one partition gets wiped out, it's easier
to restore if that's only part of your system).  You don't need to do
this, though, if you don't want to.  For Linux newbies, it's probably best
not to, simply because it's hard to judge how much space to devote to each
filesystem until you have some experience with it.

One last point:  Chances are your system will re-map the CHS drive
geometry to keep the entire new drive under 1024 cylinders.  (This is
often called "LBA mode" in the BIOS, though this labelling is technically
incorrect.)  If so, you needn't worry about this; but if you've an older
BIOS/IDE controller, it may not, in which case you'll have to keep the
Linux kernel (and for safety, I'd recommend the entire boot partition)
under the 1024-cylinder mark, which usually comes out to precisely 504MB
(1MB = 2^20 bytes) on these older IDE setups.

--
+--------------------------------------------------------------------+
| Rod Smith                                 Author of:               |

| http://ezinfo.ucs.indiana.edu/~rodsmith   "OS/2 Soundcard Summary" |
+--------------------------------------------------------------------+

 
 
 

Partitions

Post by Natha » Tue, 31 Dec 1996 04:00:00


I am soon purchasing a new computer. I wish to have Winbloze NT,
DOS, and Linux on it (1.25G Linux, 750M NT, 500M DOS). The hard drive
is a 2.5G Western Digital.

Is there a particular order that the partitions should be in in order
to work correctly? I've heard a multitiude of rumors, including:

        a) With HD's > 2.5G, Linux will*up on cyl. > 1024.
        b) DOS requires the first partition on the drive.
        c) NT and DOS both require the first position on the drive.

Please reply so I can make the best choice.

--
-Nathan (http://www.veryComputer.com/)

"Outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend. Inside
of a dog, it's too dark to read."  -Groucho Marx

 
 
 

Partitions

Post by Paul A. Sakievic » Tue, 31 Dec 1996 04:00:00



> I am soon purchasing a new computer. I wish to have Winbloze NT,
> DOS, and Linux on it (1.25G Linux, 750M NT, 500M DOS). The hard drive
> is a 2.5G Western Digital.

> Is there a particular order that the partitions should be in in order
> to work correctly? I've heard a multitiude of rumors, including:

>         a) With HD's > 2.5G, Linux will*up on cyl. > 1024.

  True...

Quote:>         b) DOS requires the first partition on the drive.

  Not true.  DOS requires the first "DOS" partition on the drive - it
just won't recognize your first partition if you install linux there
(I've done this before).

Quote:>         c) NT and DOS both require the first position on the drive.

  I don't "think" that NT _requires_ the first partition.

  The nice thing about a new system without a lot of clutter on it
already is that you are free to experiment.  If you are a glutton for
punishment, or simply have too much time on your hands, why not try to
cram a few more OSes onto your box?  I've had as many as 4 OSes on my
system:  Dos/WFW, Win95, OS/2, and Linux.  Having two drives and using
the OS/2 boot manager helped a lot (BTW, three of my drives were named
"C:" - each invisible to the other two).

  Conversely, the problem with juggling multiple partitions is that you
are almost certain to run into the case where one of your OSes is
getting tight for space.  When I was juggling
my 4 OSes, I had my second drive act as a "data" disk that the other
OSes could use.  You might consider breaking your drive into four pieces
so you can have a data partition for this same reason, or just to keep
DOS and Linux within the 1024 cylinder limit.

- Paul

 
 
 

Partitions

Post by Natha » Wed, 01 Jan 1997 04:00:00




> > I am soon purchasing a new computer. I wish to have Winbloze NT,
> > DOS, and Linux on it (1.25G Linux, 750M NT, 500M DOS). The hard drive
> > is a 2.5G Western Digital.

> > Is there a particular order that the partitions should be in in order
> > to work correctly? I've heard a multitiude of rumors, including:

> >         a) With HD's > 2.5G, Linux will*up on cyl. > 1024.
>   True...

> >         b) DOS requires the first partition on the drive.
>   Not true.  DOS requires the first "DOS" partition on the drive - it
> just won't recognize your first partition if you install linux there
> (I've done this before).

> >         c) NT and DOS both require the first position on the drive.
>   I don't "think" that NT _requires_ the first partition.

>   The nice thing about a new system without a lot of clutter on it
> already is that you are free to experiment.  If you are a glutton for
> punishment, or simply have too much time on your hands, why not try to
> cram a few more OSes onto your box?  I've had as many as 4 OSes on my
> system:  Dos/WFW, Win95, OS/2, and Linux.  Having two drives and using
> the OS/2 boot manager helped a lot (BTW, three of my drives were named
> "C:" - each invisible to the other two).

>   Conversely, the problem with juggling multiple partitions is that you
> are almost certain to run into the case where one of your OSes is
> getting tight for space.  When I was juggling
> my 4 OSes, I had my second drive act as a "data" disk that the other
> OSes could use.  You might consider breaking your drive into four pieces
> so you can have a data partition for this same reason, or just to keep
> DOS and Linux within the 1024 cylinder limit.

> - Paul

Actually, I only need NT because of some stuff my dad might need to do
(and I like the 3D drawing things it has, btw, anyone know a good
preferrably free 3D modeling app for X11?). I need DOS because games
do come in handy now and then :-). Win95/Os2 are unneeded.

Hehey! It's snowing! Gotta go!
--
-Nathan (http://www.veryComputer.com/)

"Outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend. Inside
of a dog, it's too dark to read."  -Groucho Marx

 
 
 

Partitions

Post by Stephen L » Thu, 02 Jan 1997 04:00:00



>I am soon purchasing a new computer. I wish to have Winbloze NT,
>DOS, and Linux on it (1.25G Linux, 750M NT, 500M DOS). The hard drive
>is a 2.5G Western Digital.

>Is there a particular order that the partitions should be in in order
>to work correctly? I've heard a multitiude of rumors, including:

>    a) With HD's > 2.5G, Linux will*up on cyl. > 1024.

Depends on your BIOS.  Linux will not*up, you just can't boot from a
partition over the 1024 cyl boundary.  Once it boots up there will be no
trouble seeing the whole HD.  The same is true for NT.  There are ways to
get around it for Linux, like putting your /boot directory on a small
partition at <1024, or using loadlin.  Read the large-HD mini-HOWTO.

Quote:>    b) DOS requires the first partition on the drive.

DOS requires an active, primary partition.  I'm not sure if it needs to be
the first in the partition table, but I don't think so.

Quote:>    c) NT and DOS both require the first position on the drive.

NT needs to put its loader on what is usually called the C: drive, but the
OS itself can be on a logical partition or even a 2nd HD.

Stephen

 
 
 

Partitions

Post by Stephen L » Thu, 02 Jan 1997 04:00:00




Quote:

>I've had as many as 4 OSes on my
>system:  Dos/WFW, Win95, OS/2, and Linux.  Having two drives and using
>the OS/2 boot manager helped a lot (BTW, three of my drives were named
>"C:" - each invisible to the other two).

Let's turn this into the "I have more OS on my computer than you have on
yours" ;-)

DOS/WFW, Win95, WinNT 3.51, WinNT 4.0, OS/2, and Linux.  I plan to put
FreeBSD back on when I have the time.  WinNT 3.51 will probably go
some time in the future.  I only have 1 C: drive and it is visible to all
the OSes.

Stephen

 
 
 

1. Partition Software - Partition Magic, Bootit, Boot Manager or Ranish Partition Manager


spake unto us, saying:

By default, Solaris and Linux will not be able to see each other, and
the Windows flavors will not be able to see either one.  So your only
concern will be the visibility between NT and Win95.

If you install those two in primary partitions on the same drive, there
shouldn't be a problem with that either.

Bootit is a utility I know of but have not used.

The only "Boot Manager" I know about is the OS/2 Boot Manager (also the
same as the IBM Boot Manager included as part of Partition Magic 3.x),
and it's a nice basic boot menu, but I'm not sure it's available at all
as a separate product.  I've used it for years (since 1992 I think).

Partition Magic is a glorified (and relatively powerful) fdisk utility
which I've used for quite a while.  Very useful, IMhO.  Newer versions
have things I'm not familiar with (I'm still using the OS/2 version of
PM 2.03).

Ranish's Partition Manager looks like a REALLY slick utility, and it's
on my list to play with.  But I copped out and bought a copy of System
Commander here instead.  :-)

I think I would recommend that you add System Commander to your list
above, since it allows you to selectively change primary partition
visibility (in many cases) for each individual boot menu entry.

Really, though, you probably don't need it.  The only question I would
have is how to get NT's boot manager to get along with Solaris' boot
manager, and I suspect that can be done.

--

       OS/2 + Linux (Slackware+RedHat+SuSE) + FreeBSD + Solaris +
        WinNT4 + Win95 + PC/GEOS + Executor = PC Hobbyist Heaven!
                   OPCODE: HCF = Halt and Catch Fire

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