Dude, where's my network?

Dude, where's my network?

Post by Hiawatha Bra » Mon, 07 Feb 2005 11:24:47



So I managed to install Solaris 10.  I still can't boot it directly, and
must use the CD as a sort of startup disk, but that's not much of a hassle.
by the way, can anybody tell me how to modify GRUB so I can easily boot
Solaris?

The bigger problem is connecting to the Internet and the rest of my home
network.  Suse Linux did it all pretty much automatically.  Solaris seems a
bit more demanding.  I can't find anything like  the Yast utility interface
either.

So how do I get Solaris to talk to my router, get assigned a DHCP address
and start communicating?  Where's the tool for doing this?

Thanks.

 
 
 

Dude, where's my network?

Post by Dave Uhrin » Mon, 07 Feb 2005 11:59:34



> So I managed to install Solaris 10.  I still can't boot it directly, and
> must use the CD as a sort of startup disk, but that's not much of a hassle.
> by the way, can anybody tell me how to modify GRUB so I can easily boot
> Solaris?

The URL which I posted earlier tells you exactly how to use GRUB.  Why
don't you read it?

http://multiboot.solaris-x86.org/

Quote:> The bigger problem is connecting to the Internet and the rest of my home
> network.  Suse Linux did it all pretty much automatically.  Solaris seems a
> bit more demanding.  I can't find anything like  the Yast utility interface
> either.

Solaris does not have YAST.

Quote:> So how do I get Solaris to talk to my router, get assigned a DHCP address
> and start communicating?  Where's the tool for doing this?

sys-unconfig(1M)

 
 
 

Dude, where's my network?

Post by Richard B. Gilber » Tue, 08 Feb 2005 00:18:10



>So I managed to install Solaris 10.  I still can't boot it directly, and
>must use the CD as a sort of startup disk, but that's not much of a hassle.
>by the way, can anybody tell me how to modify GRUB so I can easily boot
>Solaris?

>The bigger problem is connecting to the Internet and the rest of my home
>network.  Suse Linux did it all pretty much automatically.  Solaris seems a
>bit more demanding.  I can't find anything like  the Yast utility interface
>either.

>So how do I get Solaris to talk to my router, get assigned a DHCP address
>and start communicating?  Where's the tool for doing this?

>Thanks.

This is all normally done as part of the installation.  You are asked if
you are going to use DHCP and you answer in the affirmative. I have not
yet installed Solaris 10 but I would expect a similar process.

On Solaris 8 or 9, a badly botched configuration is most easily fixed by
running, as root, sys-unconfig, and rebooting.  You will then be
prompted for a new root password, the time zone, the networking stuff,
etc.  See man sys-unconfig for details of what gets wiped out and
rebuilt.   If you want to try it by hand, the man page should give you a
clue as to which files need to be fixed.

 
 
 

Dude, where's my network?

Post by Hiawatha Bra » Tue, 08 Feb 2005 15:14:14




>> So I managed to install Solaris 10.  I still can't boot it directly, and
>> must use the CD as a sort of startup disk, but that's not much of a
>> hassle. by the way, can anybody tell me how to modify GRUB so I can
>> easily boot Solaris?

> The URL which I posted earlier tells you exactly how to use GRUB.  Why
> don't you read it?

> http://multiboot.solaris-x86.org/

>> The bigger problem is connecting to the Internet and the rest of my home
>> network.  Suse Linux did it all pretty much automatically.  Solaris seems
>> a
>> bit more demanding.  I can't find anything like  the Yast utility
>> interface either.

> Solaris does not have YAST.

>> So how do I get Solaris to talk to my router, get assigned a DHCP address
>> and start communicating?  Where's the tool for doing this?

> sys-unconfig(1M)

Well, no it doesn't tell exactly how to use GRUB, but it did give me an idea
where to look.  I found the GRUB configuration file, and will try to puzzle
out exactly what changes are needed to let it boot Solaris.  Indeed, I
think I'll look around for a more thorough GRUB manual.  

Now to see if I can figure out sys-unconfig.  Thanks.

 
 
 

Dude, where's my network?

Post by Hiawatha Bra » Tue, 08 Feb 2005 15:39:38




>>So I managed to install Solaris 10.  I still can't boot it directly, and
>>must use the CD as a sort of startup disk, but that's not much of a
>>hassle. by the way, can anybody tell me how to modify GRUB so I can easily
>>boot Solaris?

>>The bigger problem is connecting to the Internet and the rest of my home
>>network.  Suse Linux did it all pretty much automatically.  Solaris seems
>>a
>>bit more demanding.  I can't find anything like  the Yast utility
>>interface either.

>>So how do I get Solaris to talk to my router, get assigned a DHCP address
>>and start communicating?  Where's the tool for doing this?

>>Thanks.

> This is all normally done as part of the installation.  You are asked if
> you are going to use DHCP and you answer in the affirmative. I have not
> yet installed Solaris 10 but I would expect a similar process.

> On Solaris 8 or 9, a badly botched configuration is most easily fixed by
> running, as root, sys-unconfig, and rebooting.  You will then be
> prompted for a new root password, the time zone, the networking stuff,
> etc.  See man sys-unconfig for details of what gets wiped out and
> rebuilt.   If you want to try it by hand, the man page should give you a
> clue as to which files need to be fixed.

It just gets more confusing.  At no time do I recall being asked about DHCP.
I would certainly have answered yes if the question had come up.  Instead,
I was asked about disk partitions and time zones, but not DHCP.  Odd.

So I tried running sys-unconfig.  But I can't tell if it ran or not.  When I
ordered the computer to run it, nothing happened.  I may have done it
wrong, so I figured I'd read the manual.  But when I tried, I was told that
I had to associate a "troff application" to the file in order to read it.
What the heck is troff and where do I get one?  I can't even RTFM, and it's
most annoying.  

Thanks.

 
 
 

Dude, where's my network?

Post by Dave Uhrin » Tue, 08 Feb 2005 16:03:15



> Well, no it doesn't tell exactly how to use GRUB, but it did give me an idea
> where to look.  I found the GRUB configuration file, and will try to puzzle
> out exactly what changes are needed to let it boot Solaris.  Indeed, I
> think I'll look around for a more thorough GRUB manual.  

How much more exact could the authors have stated it?
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
An axample entry in /grub/menu.lst to boot Solaris may look as follows:

title Solaris
        rootnoverify (hd0,1)
        chainloader +1
        makeactive
        boot

Of course, (hd0,1) should be modified according to the actual partition
scheme. In this example, hd0 mean the first hard disk drive, and the
number 1 means the second partition on that drive. Hard disks, as well
as partitions are counted from 0 in GRUB convention. (hd0,4) specifies
the first extended partition on the first hard disk. Command makeactive
tells GRUB to make the Solaris partition active which is required to
boot Solaris.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

Quote:> Now to see if I can figure out sys-unconfig.  Thanks.

You merely execute the command:

# /usr/sbin/sys-unconfig

You will certainly know that it has been executed!  The computer will
reboot.

 
 
 

Dude, where's my network?

Post by Dave Mine » Wed, 09 Feb 2005 05:42:13


...

Quote:

> It just gets more confusing.  At no time do I recall being asked about DHCP.
> I would certainly have answered yes if the question had come up.  Instead,
> I was asked about disk partitions and time zones, but not DHCP.  Odd.

The best bet is that there isn't a driver bundled for your network card,
so the installer doesn't think you can be networked and thus doesn't ask
you about it.  Do you know what type it is?

Dave

 
 
 

Dude, where's my network?

Post by Richard B. Gilber » Wed, 09 Feb 2005 07:12:08





>>>So I managed to install Solaris 10.  I still can't boot it directly, and
>>>must use the CD as a sort of startup disk, but that's not much of a
>>>hassle. by the way, can anybody tell me how to modify GRUB so I can easily
>>>boot Solaris?

>>>The bigger problem is connecting to the Internet and the rest of my home
>>>network.  Suse Linux did it all pretty much automatically.  Solaris seems
>>>a
>>>bit more demanding.  I can't find anything like  the Yast utility
>>>interface either.

>>>So how do I get Solaris to talk to my router, get assigned a DHCP address
>>>and start communicating?  Where's the tool for doing this?

>>>Thanks.

>>This is all normally done as part of the installation.  You are asked if
>>you are going to use DHCP and you answer in the affirmative. I have not
>>yet installed Solaris 10 but I would expect a similar process.

>>On Solaris 8 or 9, a badly botched configuration is most easily fixed by
>>running, as root, sys-unconfig, and rebooting.  You will then be
>>prompted for a new root password, the time zone, the networking stuff,
>>etc.  See man sys-unconfig for details of what gets wiped out and
>>rebuilt.   If you want to try it by hand, the man page should give you a
>>clue as to which files need to be fixed.

>It just gets more confusing.  At no time do I recall being asked about DHCP.
>I would certainly have answered yes if the question had come up.  Instead,
>I was asked about disk partitions and time zones, but not DHCP.  Odd.

>So I tried running sys-unconfig.  But I can't tell if it ran or not.  When I
>ordered the computer to run it, nothing happened.  I may have done it
>wrong, so I figured I'd read the manual.  But when I tried, I was told that
>I had to associate a "troff application" to the file in order to read it.
>What the heck is troff and where do I get one?  I can't even RTFM, and it's
>most annoying.  

>Thanks.

troff is the application that formats man pages into readable form.    
They are written in a "markup" language known as "roff" or "runoff"
which uses operators such as ".p" to begin a paragraph, ".in" to indent,
etc.  Are you entering "man sys-unconfig" from the command line?  That
has always worked on Solaris 8, Solaris 9, and the various versions of
HP-UX, True-64, and IRIX that I have used in the past.
 
 
 

Dude, where's my network?

Post by Dave Uhrin » Wed, 09 Feb 2005 08:38:46




>>So I tried running sys-unconfig.  But I can't tell if it ran or not.  When I
>>ordered the computer to run it, nothing happened.  I may have done it
>>wrong, so I figured I'd read the manual.  But when I tried, I was told that
>>I had to associate a "troff application" to the file in order to read it.
>>What the heck is troff and where do I get one?  I can't even RTFM, and it's
>>most annoying.  
> troff is the application that formats man pages into readable form.    
> They are written in a "markup" language known as "roff" or "runoff"
> which uses operators such as ".p" to begin a paragraph, ".in" to indent,
> etc.  Are you entering "man sys-unconfig" from the command line?  That
> has always worked on Solaris 8, Solaris 9, and the various versions of
> HP-UX, True-64, and IRIX that I have used in the past.

He's using a "file manager" and attempting to click and drool on the
sys-unconfig.1m icon in /usr/share/man/man1m in order to read the man page.

Command line??  What is that???

 
 
 

Dude, where's my network?

Post by ps » Wed, 09 Feb 2005 09:00:49






>>> So I tried running sys-unconfig.  But I can't tell if it ran or not.  When I
>>> ordered the computer to run it, nothing happened.  I may have done it
>>> wrong, so I figured I'd read the manual.  But when I tried, I was told that
>>> I had to associate a "troff application" to the file in order to read it.
>>> What the heck is troff and where do I get one?  I can't even RTFM, and it's
>>> most annoying.

>> troff is the application that formats man pages into readable form.
>> They are written in a "markup" language known as "roff" or "runoff"
>> which uses operators such as ".p" to begin a paragraph, ".in" to indent,
>> etc.  Are you entering "man sys-unconfig" from the command line?  That
>> has always worked on Solaris 8, Solaris 9, and the various versions of
>> HP-UX, True-64, and IRIX that I have used in the past.

> He's using a "file manager" and attempting to click and drool on the
> sys-unconfig.1m icon in /usr/share/man/man1m in order to read the man page.

> Command line??  What is that???

Is it really necessary to be an ass to someone trying to learn about
Solaris? This group would serve well to welcome new users not turn them off
to it.
 
 
 

Dude, where's my network?

Post by Dave Uhrin » Wed, 09 Feb 2005 09:22:28



> Is it really necessary to be an ass to someone trying to learn about
> Solaris? This group would serve well to welcome new users not turn them off
> to it.

"Being an ass" is attempting to run a UNIX system from a "file manager".
If you are too lazy or stupid to learn how to use a terminal you have no
place in the UNIX world.

User-Agent:    Microsoft-Entourage/11.1.0.040913

Take your complaints to the newsgroups in *windows*.

 
 
 

Dude, where's my network?

Post by ps » Wed, 09 Feb 2005 09:44:45





>> Is it really necessary to be an ass to someone trying to learn about
>> Solaris? This group would serve well to welcome new users not turn them off
>> to it.

> "Being an ass" is attempting to run a UNIX system from a "file manager".
> If you are too lazy or stupid to learn how to use a terminal you have no
> place in the UNIX world.

> User-Agent:    Microsoft-Entourage/11.1.0.040913

> Take your complaints to the newsgroups in *windows*.

* off YIF, Entourage is an OS X app, and my complaint is with YOU not
with my newsreader. It's ignorant people like you that drive potential
Solaris users to Linux or Windows.
 
 
 

Dude, where's my network?

Post by Dave Uhrin » Wed, 09 Feb 2005 10:23:02



> * off YIF, Entourage is an OS X app, and my complaint is with YOU not
> with my newsreader. It's ignorant people like you that drive potential
> Solaris users to Linux or Windows.

Not Linux.  One still needs to use a shell to admin one of those boxes.

Besides, I could not care less whether Windows users migrate to Windows;
they are already there.

In addition I have contributed 2 articles in this very thread which were
intended to assist the OP.  What was your contribution?

 
 
 

Dude, where's my network?

Post by Heny Townsen » Wed, 09 Feb 2005 10:31:44






>>>Is it really necessary to be an ass to someone trying to learn about
>>>Solaris? This group would serve well to welcome new users not turn them off
>>>to it.

>>"Being an ass" is attempting to run a UNIX system from a "file manager".
>>If you are too lazy or stupid to learn how to use a terminal you have no
>>place in the UNIX world.

>>User-Agent:    Microsoft-Entourage/11.1.0.040913

>>Take your complaints to the newsgroups in *windows*.

> * off YIF, Entourage is an OS X app, and my complaint is with YOU not
> with my newsreader. It's ignorant people like you that drive potential
> Solaris users to Linux or Windows.

You may all be interested to know that this guy (the OP) is a
journalist. I've seen his column and presumably he's trying to evaluate
the new open-source-X86-system-on-the-block for a future column. Most
likely he's trying to drive it the way a naive user would. I agree -
I've never done anything with the file manager other than to "drag it to
the recycle bin", but Solaris boosters might want to play nice for once.

--
Henry Townsend

 
 
 

Dude, where's my network?

Post by ps » Wed, 09 Feb 2005 10:33:37





>> * off YIF, Entourage is an OS X app, and my complaint is with YOU not
>> with my newsreader. It's ignorant people like you that drive potential
>> Solaris users to Linux or Windows.

> Not Linux.  One still needs to use a shell to admin one of those boxes.

One can easily admin a Linux box with a GUI. With Solaris 10 out (and being
accessible to more and more people), more people will come here with such
questions. It would be more constructive to them and Sun to help them rather
than insult and ridicule. It's really that simple.

Quote:> In addition I have contributed 2 articles in this very thread which were
> intended to assist the OP.  What was your contribution?

Correcting you, and calling you out as an ass. Have a nice day!
 
 
 

1. I'm gettin' a Dell, Dude!

Yeah.  My daughter's going off to college in August (a couple
weeks early to get a head start on the soccer program at
Centre College, KY.)

I'm turning my Enpower (Mitac) laptop over to her, and buying
a Dell Inspiron with SXGA+.  She wants that machine, but I think
a 96Mb 13" 388 MHz K6 with 10 Gb is good enough for her.  She'll
have a NIC and hopefully IT there won't FUBAR her setup.
And if it gets stolen, it's a machine that is now worth only about
$399, I'd guess.  I'll have to convert the Linux partitions to a
big-ass data partition, since she's still a Windozer.  I hope I
can get her self-sufficient.  Centre HelpLess Desk will have
to deal with her.  Bwa-ha-ha-ha-ha!  Hope they gotta good
dang firewall. KaZaa here we come!

I want the Dell to be a replacement for this old P II 400 MHz
desktop with 356Mb of RAM.  I can re-use this machine for
a Linux server, convert my P 166 Linux server into a dual
boot (Win 98 and Linux) workstation for doing some Win 98
work I need to do for a client/friend.

I looked at Toshiba, but the 15" screen has only a res of
1024x768, same as the current laptop.

I looked at the HP Pavilion, but it was a couple hundred
more expensive than the Dell.

So, bottom line, I succumbed to the Stephen-Meister.

Dude, I'm gettin' a Dell.

Chris

--
It is much easier to suggest solutions when you know nothing about the problem.

2. httpd: could not bind to port 80

3. After linux's network works, win XP's network cannot work ?

4. New Red Hat Linux on the way

5. Redhat 7.1 'eepro100' and 'e100' drivers won't see 10BaseT network

6. grep exiting with 1 break while loop

7. Hey, Big Wheel Corporate Dudes!!! Read this...

8. Peter Norton is one smart dude

9. Thanks dudes and Dudettes!

10. Buffalo logic, for all Linux Dudes and Dudettes...

11. Cypherpunk: lay off the weed, dude

12. Off topic, anyone here a math dude?