Linux or Solaris on a laptop?

Linux or Solaris on a laptop?

Post by Bruce Barnet » Wed, 25 Nov 1998 04:00:00



I have installed Linux on two laptops (as well as own a Tadpole with
SPARC Solaris).

The first Linux install took several weeks to get working. (Redhat
4.1)

I installed RedHat 5.1 on an IBM Thinkpad 385 a week ago. It
installed in a day. I had to get the latest server for it from the
Internet. Other than that it was easy.

My advice:

Make sure you know if the hardware is supported before you purchase
your laptop.

Make sure you have Internet access if you get stuck. It's hard to get
it working when your network interface is down.

--
Bruce  <barnett at crd. ge. com> (speaking as myself, and not a GE employee)

 
 
 

Linux or Solaris on a laptop?

Post by d » Thu, 26 Nov 1998 04:00:00


The question wether to use Linux or Solaris on a laptop is easily
answered when you consider:

- The Linux communitiy supports laptops where possible
- There are different distributions of Linux that make
  installation on a laptop a dream.
- Linux ships with a huge amount of applications like
  databases, editors, image manipulation programs, utilities,
  Office Suites and window managers you can directly use.
- Linux requires less RAM
- Linux is faster
- There are more hardware drivers for Linux

So unless you really NEED Solaris x86 for some reason, it's much
wiser to get yourself a US$ 25 cd-rom of Redhat or Caldera and
install Linux on a laptop. Or just get the boot disks and install
from an ftp on internet.

Installation issues:

That Solaris X86 is easier to install than Linux is a real joke.
Maybe things have changed recently but as far as I remember,
you need at least 5 floppies (boot and patch disks) before you
see X coming up for installation (half an hour later?). Of course,
if you're lucky enough to have a net or scsi adapter wich is
supported by Solaris x86.

Getting X running at a decent depth and resolution with Solaris X86
on a Toshiba Portege was another adventure. (Ok, you can get other
drivers from the net or commercial X's but I'm talking about what's
on the CD). Linux distributions supported the Toshiba (and I'm sure
many other laptops) with a max depth/max resolution outta the box.

Now about windowing systems. How can someone say that KDE is a
Windows clone? The only thing that tries to look like Windows
on Linux is Fvwm, a window manager used by Redhat in former
versions. Depending on the distribution you get you can use
KDE, Fvwm, Lesstif (a motif clone), Openlook (remember?) and many
more.

And...there is more free software available for LInux than for Solaris.

Solaris is a workstation/server operating system to be used with
specific applications and in environments where stability is number
one. Not that Solaris is so much more stable than Linux (stability
is primarily a issue of good adminstration in both cases), but
with Solaris you can hold someone else responsible when something
goes wrong, when you get Linux into the company and something goes
wrong it's you who's gonna be blamed for it.

Anyway...most choices for OS's are made for strategic ("No one ever got
fired for buying ...." or..." let's stick with leading companies,
remember the Verity joke btw"), cosmetig ("CDE looks nicer than KDE,
 which is a windows clone" :P) and psychological ("I love golf").

If -even after Sun says they'll drop support for laptops- one still
decides to put Solaris x86 on a laptop, all this is religion after all.

Dimitri Georganas
MiTC

(I suggest Linus Torvalds and Scott McNealy go play golf some time.)

 
 
 

Linux or Solaris on a laptop?

Post by Alan DuBo » Fri, 27 Nov 1998 04:00:00



Quote:>The question wether to use Linux or Solaris on a laptop is easily
>answered when you consider:

>- The Linux communitiy supports laptops where possible
>- There are different distributions of Linux that make
>  installation on a laptop a dream.
>- Linux ships with a huge amount of applications like
>  databases, editors, image manipulation programs, utilities,
>  Office Suites and window managers you can directly use.
>- Linux requires less RAM
>- Linux is faster
>- There are more hardware drivers for Linux

You have raised some good points for Linux, and I run it on my ThinkPad
and it did install fairly easy, as well as supporting my hardware,
although they don't list all the video adapters and it's often hit and
miss until you get the right now. The first time I installed it, I spent
at least a week, I'll comment on that later.

You say above that this is easily answered, but you fail to mention
actual work. How about looking for work on Linux vs. Solaris? I agree,
it really can be answered fairly quickly for those people that like to
work, but sorry Dimitri, the answer is not Linux for that question!

Quote:>That Solaris X86 is easier to install than Linux is a real joke.
>Maybe things have changed recently but as far as I remember,
>you need at least 5 floppies (boot and patch disks) before you
>see X coming up for installation (half an hour later?). Of course,
>if you're lucky enough to have a net or scsi adapter wich is
>supported by Solaris x86.

It seems you are talking out the side of your mouth on this one, since
you state, "as far as I remember". I recentely was trying to get Solaris
installed on my Thinkpad (765D) and a few things I can comment on about
Solaris 7.

1) Solaris falls into the same category as NT as far as partitions go,
and I definitely put it in the "doesn't play well with others" category.
This is the only reason it's not on my Thinkpad right at this moment.

2) While Solaris doesn't officially support laptops anymore, there is a
tremendous amount of laptop support included, and it is actually easier,
IMHO, to configure the video adapter and test it to make sure it works.
Linux is hit and miss configuring XFree86 and each time I have done it,
it seems to take longer than I would hope. kdmconfig, OTOH, works much
better to me.

3) Linux is definitely a bit leaner and meaner, but to me the Solaris 7
feels more stable.

4) Linux rpm is very nice to use, although the GUI included with fvwm is
a real piece of $#!T, xrpm is a good replacement and works. I like the
fact that Linux can install with rpm, and the software is loaded and
working, a definite plus.

5) Linux is much easier to get all development tools installed and
working, while Solaris takes a bit more work as they are not shipped on
the distribution.

6) IMHO, fvwm blows chunks compared to CDE. CDE is hands down a much
more refined GUI and the support of drag/drop is very well supported,
especially in things such as console windows to highlite text and
drag/drop it in the same window where it will copy it to the command
line.

Quote:>And...there is more free software available for LInux than for Solaris.

How do you figure this? It is my understanding that most all the free
software available for Linux was developed and running on Solaris before
Linux was born. And all the same GNU software will compile and run on
Solaris, no?

Quote:>If -even after Sun says they'll drop support for laptops- one still
>decides to put Solaris x86 on a laptop, all this is religion after all.

Yes, it could be hit and miss to get it to run on ones laptop, but I've
seen plenty of problems on the Linux lists for people with various
laptops. I reinstalled Linux 5.1 on my Thinkpad before leaving for
Thanksgiving with my parents. The first time I installed Linux on this
same machine, an IBM Thinkpad 765D with 88mb of RAM, it took me about a
week to get the PCMCIA working correctly, as I installed it on an
external SCSI drive connected to an Adaptect 1460a card. Linux installed
it fine, using the supplemental disk, but was not loading the PCMCIA
automatically after that when it rebooted. Not being a *ix geek, it took
time to find someone that understood the problem, but that did happen
and I got it running finally (thanks Wade Hampton!;-)

Quote:>cosmetig ("CDE looks nicer than KDE,  which is a windows clone" :P)

I don't have much experience with KDE, but it runs on Solaris also, as
do most of the other desktops available for Linux I'm told, but I have
only used fvwm on Linux and CDE and OpenWindows on Solaris. CDE is so
much nicer, and many of the apps I have on fvwm are hacked together
front ends to old character based back ends, many that load slow and run
sluggishly. CDE takes more resource to run, but it's worth it IMHO.
Sure, Sun doesn't package a lot of those hacked up front ends for you,
but you can probably get most of them if you look, although not all for
Solaris.

I've looked hard at both Linux and Solaris and have both running. I like
Linux quite a bit, but somehow like Solaris more. With the fact that
there is work on Solaris but very little on Linux (and maybe that will
change in the future) almost makes it a no brainer for me. Call me a
masocist if you like, but I will be putting Solaris on my laptop as well
as running it for ip masquerading at home on a desktop.

Alan DuBoff - Conductor
Software Orchestration, Inc.

 
 
 

Linux or Solaris on a laptop?

Post by <d.. » Fri, 27 Nov 1998 04:00:00



: You have raised some good points for Linux, and I run it on my ThinkPad
: and it did install fairly easy, as well as supporting my hardware,
: although they don't list all the video adapters and it's often hit and
: miss until you get the right now. The first time I installed it, I spent
: at least a week, I'll comment on that later.

Yes...I believe that depends on the video adapter you have and the
Linux distribution. I've had problems with certain video adapters too
using Redhat, but I've had similar problems with Solaris x86. Caldera
OpenLinux seems doing the out-of-the-box configuration pretty well.

Then then the graphical X configurator sucks bigtime...it doesn't even
seem to store the config file in the right place.

: You say above that this is easily answered, but you fail to mention
: actual work. How about looking for work on Linux vs. Solaris? I agree,
: it really can be answered fairly quickly for those people that like to
: work, but sorry Dimitri, the answer is not Linux for that question!

I don't get this one...you mean looking for work on Linux...like finding
a job in administrating Linux or something? Or you mean working as being
productive on a certain platform?

: It seems you are talking out the side of your mouth on this one, since
: you state, "as far as I remember". I recentely was trying to get Solaris
: installed on my Thinkpad (765D) and a few things I can comment on about
: Solaris 7.

Well the installation of Solaris X86 was never made as easy as Linux
with Loadlin and 1-boot-disk installation. If things have improved
since Solaris 7 that's very good.

: 2) While Solaris doesn't officially support laptops anymore, there is a
: tremendous amount of laptop support included, and it is actually easier,
: IMHO, to configure the video adapter and test it to make sure it works.
: Linux is hit and miss configuring XFree86 and each time I have done it,
: it seems to take longer than I would hope. kdmconfig, OTOH, works much
: better to me.

Well until when? Maybe laptop functionality will slowly be trimmed out
in future versions of Solaris.

: 3) Linux is definitely a bit leaner and meaner, but to me the Solaris 7
: feels more stable.

Stability is a matter of administration. Solaris is very stable, but
I'm really not sure if that goes for Solaris x86 as well.

: 4) Linux rpm is very nice to use, although the GUI included with fvwm is
: a real piece of $#!T, xrpm is a good replacement and works. I like the
: fact that Linux can install with rpm, and the software is loaded and
: working, a definite plus.

Well... you can also use Openwindows on Linux ;)  You're are talking
distribution specific here: RedHat. If you pick another distribution,
you'll find other default window managers.

: 6) IMHO, fvwm blows chunks compared to CDE. CDE is hands down a much
: more refined GUI and the support of drag/drop is very well supported,
: especially in things such as console windows to highlite text and
: drag/drop it in the same window where it will copy it to the command
: line.

Right, but then the xterm's of CDE suck ;) anyway...you can get any  
window manager you want on both OS's...I don't think that really matters.

:>And...there is more free software available for LInux than for Solaris.

: How do you figure this? It is my understanding that most all the free
: software available for Linux was developed and running on Solaris before
: Linux was born. And all the same GNU software will compile and run on
: Solaris, no?

No. SunOS maybe. But Solaris is not that much older than Linux, if older
at all. Anyway...it's just easier to find something for Linux on the net
apparently because there are more things ported to it.

: Yes, it could be hit and miss to get it to run on ones laptop, but I've
: seen plenty of problems on the Linux lists for people with various
: laptops. I reinstalled Linux 5.1 on my Thinkpad before leaving for
: Thanksgiving with my parents. The first time I installed Linux on this
: same machine, an IBM Thinkpad 765D with 88mb of RAM, it took me about a
: week to get the PCMCIA working correctly, as I installed it on an
: external SCSI drive connected to an Adaptect 1460a card. Linux installed
: it fine, using the supplemental disk, but was not loading the PCMCIA
: automatically after that when it rebooted. Not being a *ix geek, it took
: time to find someone that understood the problem, but that did happen
: and I got it running finally (thanks Wade Hampton!;-)

Hmm maybe you forgot to install the pcmcia package? I run caldera
on a Libretto Toshiba and everything worked out of the box. I agree
there are different experiences also depending on distribution, but
I guess that's more of a general installation problem and not specific
to Linux. (I've installed solaris over network and after that no netwerk
card working ;) )

: change in the future) almost makes it a no brainer for me. Call me a
: masocist if you like, but I will be putting Solaris on my laptop as well
: as running it for ip masquerading at home on a desktop.

Uh once you get commercial with Solaris (work)  you gotta pay $$.
Solaris is much slower on a PC than linux as well. MUCH slower.

I use Linux on a laptop because I want don't want to spend 2 more
months to gather and compile the applications I need. Fax, databases,
perl, tcl, gcc, isdn drivers etc. After your week of installing Linux
(after a while you'll do it in two hours), you have everything you can
get application wise. After installing Solaris you can go search the web
for usable stuff, try to compile it (You'll be surprised what won't compile
on Solaris) and once you're ready figure out there was a newer version
after all.

Dimitri Georganas
MITC

 
 
 

Linux or Solaris on a laptop?

Post by Andrew Gabri » Fri, 27 Nov 1998 04:00:00




Quote:

>Stability is a matter of administration. Solaris is very stable, but
>I'm really not sure if that goes for Solaris x86 as well.

Yes. Of course, it's much easier to find crappy x86 hardware
than crappy sparc hardware, but providing the hardware hangs
together, there are no stability problems.

--
Andrew Gabriel
Consultant Software Engineer

 
 
 

Linux or Solaris on a laptop?

Post by MiTC » Sat, 28 Nov 1998 04:00:00




:>
:>Stability is a matter of administration. Solaris is very stable, but
:>I'm really not sure if that goes for Solaris x86 as well.

: Yes. Of course, it's much easier to find crappy x86 hardware
: than crappy sparc hardware, but providing the hardware hangs
: together, there are no stability problems.

Sure, let's blame all OS instability problems on the hardware.
Makes consultancy a pretty easy job.

 
 
 

Linux or Solaris on a laptop?

Post by Alan DuBo » Sat, 28 Nov 1998 04:00:00



Quote:>Yes...I believe that depends on the video adapter you have and the
>Linux distribution. I've had problems with certain video adapters too
>using Redhat, but I've had similar problems with Solaris x86. Caldera
>OpenLinux seems doing the out-of-the-box configuration pretty well.

No argument with certain videos, even can happen on Windows with a
poorly supported card. I was quite amazed at the amount of video cards
that are suppored on Solaris 7, but honestly don't know how the numbers
compare to Linux. Linux was harder for me to get the video right, not
just on one machine but on a few different ones.

Quote:>I don't get this one...you mean looking for work on Linux...like finding
>a job in administrating Linux or something? Or you mean working as being
>productive on a certain platform?

Yes, I mean actual jobs that pay $$$s, or what most of us call work. I
would say that the majority of Intel based PCs that run some flavor of
*ix, run Linux. While Linux supports more than just the Intel chip, the
majority of users for Linux do in fact run it on an Intel platform.

Wanting to get experience with some flavor of *ix and having all Intel
hardware which I own, Linux was the natural OS to pick for myself to
learn. However, I became a bit frustrated when looking for jobs on it,
there are very few, and a lot of the ones that are available are writing
device drivers. In comparison, Solaris has so many more jobs, it
eclipses Linux jobs easily.

Quote:>Well the installation of Solaris X86 was never made as easy as Linux
>with Loadlin and 1-boot-disk installation. If things have improved
>since Solaris 7 that's very good.

Yes, Solaris 7 only requires a single floppy and a CD. The same floppy
can be modified and used for a boot floppy and load a specific partition
as well. The install for Solaris 7 is much bigger and slower to load
than the Red Hat 5.1 I have used (I have not installed a Red Hat 5.2
which I hear is even better), but Solaris get the information from you,
then loads OpenWindows for the install, so it's a much nicer looking
install.

Quote:>: kdmconfig, OTOH, works much
>: better to me.

>Well until when? Maybe laptop functionality will slowly be trimmed out
>in future versions of Solaris.

Well, this is possible Dimitri, I won't argue that it is not. But There
is a lot of support for Thinkpads, Toshibas, and others (NEC possibly, I
can't remember exactly right now. I'm not sure why Sun announced that
they are not supporting laptops anymore, the support is still there. I
think it might have something to do with too many laptop models being
out there, and Sun not wanting to commit to supporting more/all of them.

Quote:>Stability is a matter of administration. Solaris is very stable, but
>I'm really not sure if that goes for Solaris x86 as well.

My attraction to Solaris for Intel is because of the work for Solaris in
general, and the system is setup the same. Because I don't have any
Sparc hardware, Solaris for Intel was a perfect solution for me to learn
it. The apps definitely seem better to me than the ones that are shipped
with Linux, which many seem like hacked together front ends which work
together with older character based apps. Not that all of them are, but
several give me that impression. The apps that ship with Solaris 7 for
Intel, while not as plentiful, are much more "industrial strength". I'm
sure many will beat me up on this statement, but it's my honest
feelings.

Quote:>Well... you can also use Openwindows on Linux ;)  You're are talking
>distribution specific here: RedHat. If you pick another distribution,
>you'll find other default window managers.

Thats true, but I hear that CDE doesn't run that well on Linux, and that
is what I like and what came with my Solaris. The usage of drag/drop is
great, I'm very much into direct manipulation.

Quote:>Right, but then the xterm's of CDE suck ;) anyway...you can get any  
>window manager you want on both OS's...I don't think that really matters.

You might have more experience than me in this area, but I don't notice
anything that drastically wrong with them. Why don't you tell me so I
have something to dislike on it. Once I added bash, I'm fairly happy
with the consoles/xterms. I must say that I consider the default shell
of bash on Linux to be something I like, I prefer that shell to most of
the others, it works more like most of the shells I've used on DOS,
OS/2, and NT.

Quote:>Hmm maybe you forgot to install the pcmcia package?

Nope, that wasn't the problem, it definitely installed it, it needed to
use it for the install. I installed everything on the Red Hat
distribution. What was going on was that it was not starting
automatically when it reboot, so it couldn't get any of the apps, they
were all on the external SCSI disk.

Quote:>Uh once you get commercial with Solaris (work)  you gotta pay $$.
>Solaris is much slower on a PC than linux as well. MUCH slower.

I would gladly pay for a commercial license if I got some work.

I'm not sure what you are comparing for speed, but why not elaborate. I
agree that some things are more slugish, but I run Solaris 7 for Intel
on a 100mhz Pentium with 80mb of RAM, it's totally acceptable to me. A
lot of the apps on Linux are very slugish as well, like the Network
Interface app from the control panel, a slow, bloated tcl app. It is
easier to use than asppp on Solaris, but I read in the FAQ that there
are decent replacements with GUI interfaces for Solaris.

Quote:>I use Linux on a laptop because I want don't want to spend 2 more
>months to gather and compile the applications I need. Fax, databases,
>perl, tcl, gcc, isdn drivers etc.

I think your over exagerating with this "2 more months" figure.

My point is that while you get a pile of apps with the Linux
distribution, many are not the quality I would hope for. Mail for
instance, there are many good mailers distributed with Linux, but exmh
(?) is a hacked together front end for mh, pine and elm are character
based, and it seemed that elm had a front end for it. I haven't been
able to use the Mailer on Solaris 7 as I am not sure how to configure to
have it use my POP server for mail, but the Mailer program is actually a
very decent mail application, IMO.

Quote:>After your week of installing Linux (after a while you'll do it in two hours)

Yes, my install a couple days ago took less than an hour,  but I only
installed the basic end user type system. I don't plan on keeping it
there, the only reason I don't have Solaris on my Thinkpad is that the
way it handles the drives and where it will install would require me to
move some things around with Partition Magic (a program I'm not terribly
fond of), or reinstall NT (which I'm using right now for this NG).

Quote:>you have everything you can
>get application wise. After installing Solaris you can go search the web
>for usable stuff, try to compile it (You'll be surprised what won't compile
>on Solaris) and once you're ready figure out there was a newer version
>after all.

Maybe that is the case for you, but I don't think I need that much stuff
for it. I only want to do ip masquerading, and have a development
environment. Sun Workshop 5.0 is available on early access (yes, I know
I will need a license to use it for commercial work), gcc is availalble,
make, vim, etc.... Alternately if someone wanted, they could get one of
the Solaris x86 CDs from EIS, and it appears to have a lot of the stuff
you list. It is more pricey than the Linux distribution (I think $79),
but if your thinking about just saving yourself time, that CD would
probably do it. I'll go the download it from the web and get it setup
for myself. I don't mind the time, I know where many of the packages are
that I will need.

There is no reason that Solaris x86 and Linux can't be used by the same
person, they will both accomplish a very similar task, but Solaris has
the attraction of work available, where would a person go to find a lot
of that for Linux?

Alan DuBoff - Conductor
Software Orchestration, Inc.

 
 
 

Linux or Solaris on a laptop?

Post by Oben Candemi » Sat, 28 Nov 1998 04:00:00






>:>
>:>Stability is a matter of administration. Solaris is very stable, but
>:>I'm really not sure if that goes for Solaris x86 as well.

>: Yes. Of course, it's much easier to find crappy x86 hardware
>: than crappy sparc hardware, but providing the hardware hangs
>: together, there are no stability problems.

>Sure, let's blame all OS instability problems on the hardware.
>Makes consultancy a pretty easy job.

I have used Solaris 2.6, and Linux 2.0.xx kernels on x86 hardware. Solaris
is the flakiest OS I have ever used. Linux is the most stable by far. Never
a crash. Ever.

Oben

 
 
 

Linux or Solaris on a laptop?

Post by Andrew Gabri » Sat, 28 Nov 1998 04:00:00







>:>
>:>Stability is a matter of administration. Solaris is very stable, but
>:>I'm really not sure if that goes for Solaris x86 as well.

>: Yes. Of course, it's much easier to find crappy x86 hardware
>: than crappy sparc hardware, but providing the hardware hangs
>: together, there are no stability problems.

>Sure, let's blame all OS instability problems on the hardware.
>Makes consultancy a pretty easy job.

I buy good hardware (not expensive, not necessarily the fastest)
and I have no problems. We have some Solaris x86 on desktops as
developer systems, lots of Solaris x86 systems used for particular
applications, and our server is Solaris x86. We use it as the
development platform of choice for unix developments, even when
the target is some other unix.  Linux is too different from
the commercial unixs to be used in this way. (If it finally
decided to become System V, that might change, but it seems to
have never made its mind up if it's System V or BSD, and falls
somewhere in between.)

We have quite a lot of Linux on the desktop, and for a single
user desktop environment for staff not doing commercial software
development, I would say it's better than Solaris x86. I would
imagine a laptop is not normally used for software development,
and is always a single user machine, so I would go with Linux
on that where these assumptions hold.

We don't have stability problems with any of our Unix systems
(Linux, Solaris, or others), regardless of hardware (but
remember what I said above about the hardware I choose).
Now MS Windows (of all types) on the same hardware; that's a
totally different storey...

--
Andrew Gabriel
Consultant Software Engineer

 
 
 

Linux or Solaris on a laptop?

Post by David Richar » Tue, 08 Dec 1998 04:00:00



>So unless you really NEED Solaris x86 for some reason, it's much
>wiser to get yourself a US$ 25 cd-rom of Redhat or Caldera and
>install Linux on a laptop. Or just get the boot disks and install
>from an ftp on internet.

The non-commercial licensed Solaris 7 install set is under $25 including
shipping-
                http://www.sun.com/developers/solarispromo.html

Quote:>Installation issues:

>That Solaris X86 is easier to install than Linux is a real joke.
>Maybe things have changed recently but as far as I remember,
>you need at least 5 floppies (boot and patch disks) before you
>see X coming up for installation (half an hour later?). Of course,

Solaris 2.6 and 7 both require one boot floppy and a CD-ROM drive.

Quote:>if you're lucky enough to have a net or scsi adapter wich is
>supported by Solaris x86.

If you can't afford to buy new, supported, quality hardware, then by all
means stick to Linux. If you _can_ afford quality hardware, buy hardware
that is supported by all major operating systems, and choose your OS based
on issues other than whether it will support that old discontinued ISA NIC
you found in the alley behind your local ISP...

Quote:>Getting X running at a decent depth and resolution with Solaris X86
>on a Toshiba Portege was another adventure. (Ok, you can get other
>drivers from the net or commercial X's but I'm talking about what's
>on the CD).

Sun has been vague about whether they do/will support X86 laptops.

Quote:>Solaris is a workstation/server operating system to be used with
>specific applications and in environments where stability is number
>one. Not that Solaris is so much more stable than Linux (stability
>is primarily a issue of good adminstration in both cases), but
>with Solaris you can hold someone else responsible when something
>goes wrong, when you get Linux into the company and something goes
>wrong it's you who's gonna be blamed for it.

For the most part that is true- OTOH, Solaris on Sparc _is_ much more
stable than anything on Intel, Linux included. You really have to buy new,
supported, quality reliable hardware to get reliability out of ANY unix.

Quote:>Anyway...most choices for OS's are made for strategic ("No one ever got
>fired for buying ...." or..." let's stick with leading companies,
>remember the Verity joke btw"), cosmetig ("CDE looks nicer than KDE,
> which is a windows clone" :P) and psychological ("I love golf").

>If -even after Sun says they'll drop support for laptops- one still
>decides to put Solaris x86 on a laptop, all this is religion after all.

The only 'right' way to run Solaris on a laptop is with a Sparc laptop,
but since list price starts at $12K, that's not an option for most of us.
 
 
 

Linux or Solaris on a laptop?

Post by jamie dola » Tue, 08 Dec 1998 04:00:00


Quote:>For the most part that is true- OTOH, Solaris on Sparc _is_ much more
>stable than anything on Intel, Linux included. You really have to buy new,
>supported, quality reliable hardware to get reliability out of ANY unix.

I have to disagree with the statement about intel being less stable.
I have a Intel Solaris machine that has gone for almost half a year with
out a reboot.  One note, the intel machine ran me around $9,000USD.   :-)
I think that Quality Intel products can be just as STABLE as SPARC's.

-Jamie

 
 
 

Linux or Solaris on a laptop?

Post by Peter J Nayl » Mon, 14 Dec 1998 04:00:00




Quote:

> I have to disagree with the statement about intel being less stable.
> I have a Intel Solaris machine that has gone for almost half a year with
> out a reboot.  One note, the intel machine ran me around $9,000USD.   :-)
> I think that Quality Intel products can be just as STABLE as SPARC's.

$9k, and still no OB-PROM.  What a deal...

--
/*-------------------------------------------------------------*
 * Peter James Naylor ## SysAdmin, Supernal Technologies, Inc. *
 *-------------------------------------------------------------*

    *-------------------------------------------------------*/

 
 
 

1. Linux Laptop config database?? Linux Laptop NG?

Does a database of Linux configuration settings for laptops exist?  If so
where?  I have found pages dealing specifically with running Linux on the
IBM Thinkpad family and NEC Versa laptops, and I'd like to see more.

I'm really interested in running xwin on a subnote.  But which one to buy?
Any suggestions?  Are there Linux Laptop newsgroups?

TIA
J. Vitosky

2. faxing from X

3. newbie question: Linux Laptop as remote Xterminal to Solaris or HP-UX

4. !! Gnome Questions and others !!

5. install Window 2000, Linux, Solaris and OpenBSD on laptop

6. Question about permissions

7. Linux or Solaris on a laptop?

8. Shareware/freeware programs for x86 2.5

9. Laptop To Laptop Data Transfer

10. Solaris-to-Linux porting guide and Solaris-to-Linux API checker

11. Commercial: -Linux Network Services Bootcamp W/free Linux laptop!