/etc/system file goes into panic on boot!

/etc/system file goes into panic on boot!

Post by laura Hradow » Wed, 12 Feb 2003 11:59:42



Help, I have a /etc/system file that I have taken from a backup right before
the boot disk crashed, I had to replace the OS and now when I use the "full"
version of the system file it goes into a panic and reboots.

The first part was for the rm6 software, and it boots fine with that. I
think I have all the other software install that need to be ...

This is what is in the file that makes it crash...
* Begin MDD database info (do not edit)
set md:mddb_bootlist1="ssd:3:16 ssd:3:1050 ssd:3:2084 ssd:3:3118 ssd:3:4152"
set md:mddb_bootlist2="ssd:11:16 ssd:11:1050 ssd:11:2084 ssd:11:3118"
set md:mddb_bootlist3="ssd:11:4152"
set shmsys:shminfo_shmmax=1011089408
set shmsys:shminfo_shmmin=100
set shmsys:shminfo_shmmni=100
set shmsys:shminfo_shmseg=100
set semsys:seminfo_semmap=64
set semsys:seminfo_semmni=4096
set semsys:seminfo_semmns=4096
set semsys:seminfo_semmnu=4096
set semsys:seminfo_semume=64
* End MDD database info (do not edit)
* The following line is for ntp...do not remove
set dosynctodr=0

I have ntp running and configured.
I do believe that the settings have to do with memory for the sysbase
database?

Thanks for all your help
Laura

 
 
 

/etc/system file goes into panic on boot!

Post by Darren Dunha » Wed, 12 Feb 2003 14:24:13



Quote:> This is what is in the file that makes it crash...
> * Begin MDD database info (do not edit)
> set md:mddb_bootlist1="ssd:3:16 ssd:3:1050 ssd:3:2084 ssd:3:3118 ssd:3:4152"
> set md:mddb_bootlist2="ssd:11:16 ssd:11:1050 ssd:11:2084 ssd:11:3118"
> set md:mddb_bootlist3="ssd:11:4152"

This tells it information about your disksuite/volume manager
installation.  If you replaced your boot disk and did not reinitialize
disk suite, you don't want those lines in.  Reinstall/setup your
disksuite stuff for your new root drive.

Quote:> set shmsys:shminfo_shmmax=1011089408
> set shmsys:shminfo_shmmin=100
> set shmsys:shminfo_shmmni=100
> set shmsys:shminfo_shmseg=100
> set semsys:seminfo_semmap=64
> set semsys:seminfo_semmni=4096
> set semsys:seminfo_semmns=4096
> set semsys:seminfo_semmnu=4096
> set semsys:seminfo_semume=64

That shouldn't bother stuff.

Quote:> * End MDD database info (do not edit)
> * The following line is for ntp...do not remove
> set dosynctodr=0

Very very old.  You shouldn't need that for any modern version of ntp.

--

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Got some Dr Pepper?                           San Francisco, CA bay area
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/etc/system file goes into panic on boot!

Post by Ben » Thu, 13 Feb 2003 12:15:33


<snipped>

Quote:

>>* End MDD database info (do not edit)
>>* The following line is for ntp...do not remove
>>set dosynctodr=0

> Very very old.  You shouldn't need that for any modern version of ntp.

Yes, this could be a part of your problem.  See:

http://www.eecis.udel.edu/~ntp/ntp_spool/html/hints/solaris-dosynctod...

It's an old Sunsolve article but I recall reading somewhere that this
was emphatically discouraged in Solaris 2.6 and up.

 
 
 

/etc/system file goes into panic on boot!

Post by L Hradow » Thu, 13 Feb 2003 14:25:54


Thank you it worked, I omitted the info on the set md, because I have not
set up my disk mirroring with disksuite yet. The other info in for memory
locations for one of the databases running on the system

The set dosynctodr=0
Works because I have the old version of ntp running on the system. I have to
stay at 2.6

Once again, thank you for explaining this too me, very muchly appreciated.



> > This is what is in the file that makes it crash...
> > * Begin MDD database info (do not edit)
> > set md:mddb_bootlist1="ssd:3:16 ssd:3:1050 ssd:3:2084 ssd:3:3118
ssd:3:4152"
> > set md:mddb_bootlist2="ssd:11:16 ssd:11:1050 ssd:11:2084 ssd:11:3118"
> > set md:mddb_bootlist3="ssd:11:4152"

> This tells it information about your disksuite/volume manager
> installation.  If you replaced your boot disk and did not reinitialize
> disk suite, you don't want those lines in.  Reinstall/setup your
> disksuite stuff for your new root drive.

> > set shmsys:shminfo_shmmax=1011089408
> > set shmsys:shminfo_shmmin=100
> > set shmsys:shminfo_shmmni=100
> > set shmsys:shminfo_shmseg=100
> > set semsys:seminfo_semmap=64
> > set semsys:seminfo_semmni=4096
> > set semsys:seminfo_semmns=4096
> > set semsys:seminfo_semmnu=4096
> > set semsys:seminfo_semume=64

> That shouldn't bother stuff.

> > * End MDD database info (do not edit)
> > * The following line is for ntp...do not remove
> > set dosynctodr=0

> Very very old.  You shouldn't need that for any modern version of ntp.

> --

> Unix System Administrator                    Taos - The SysAdmin Company
> Got some Dr Pepper?                           San Francisco, CA bay area
>          < This line left intentionally blank to confuse you. >

 
 
 

/etc/system file goes into panic on boot!

Post by those who know me have no need of my nam » Fri, 14 Feb 2003 17:13:21


in comp.unix.questions i read:

Quote:>The set dosynctodr=0
>Works because I have the old version of ntp running on the system. I have to
>stay at 2.6

ntp 4.1.1a is available for solaris 2.6, from sunfreeware.com.

--
bringing you boring signatures for 17 years

 
 
 

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