Any difference between /sbin/sh and /bin/sh?

Any difference between /sbin/sh and /bin/sh?

Post by Russ Allber » Thu, 26 Oct 2000 04:00:00




Quote:> Hi,
> Does anyone know the answer? With my solaris2.5,
> unity> ll /sbin/sh
> -r-xr-xr-x  2 bin      root       197672 Aug  7  1996 /sbin/sh
> unity> ll /bin/sh
> -r-xr-xr-x  3 bin      root        89492 Aug  7  1996 /bin/sh
> unity>

windlord:~> ldd /sbin/sh
ldd: /sbin/sh: file is not a dynamic executable or shared object
windlord:~> ldd /bin/sh
        libc.so.1 =>     /usr/lib/libc.so.1
        libdl.so.1 =>    /usr/lib/libdl.so.1
        /usr/platform/SUNW,Ultra-1/lib/libc_psr.so.1

/sbin/sh is statically linked and therefore doesn't depend as much on the
general health of your system and the integrity of your system libraries
to work.

--

 
 
 

Any difference between /sbin/sh and /bin/sh?

Post by Luke Z. Yan » Fri, 27 Oct 2000 13:40:27


Hi,
Does anyone know the answer? With my solaris2.5,
unity> ll /sbin/sh
-r-xr-xr-x  2 bin      root       197672 Aug  7  1996 /sbin/sh
unity> ll /bin/sh
-r-xr-xr-x  3 bin      root        89492 Aug  7  1996 /bin/sh
unity>

Thanks in advance,

--
Luke

 
 
 

Any difference between /sbin/sh and /bin/sh?

Post by Luke Z. Yan » Fri, 27 Oct 2000 04:00:00


Thanks, Russ.

Another question, is there any difference between their functionality?  So far as I know,
/sbin/sh is usually used for the root at the single user mode.

--
Luke

 
 
 

Any difference between /sbin/sh and /bin/sh?

Post by Noel Nihil » Sat, 28 Oct 2000 01:06:55




Quote:> Thanks, Russ.

> Another question, is there any difference between their functionality?  So
far as I know,
> /sbin/sh is usually used for the root at the single user mode.

No difference - the reason /sbin/sh is used by root is so it will
work if the /usr filesystem is unavailable for some reason.

N

Quote:

> --
> Luke

 
 
 

Any difference between /sbin/sh and /bin/sh?

Post by Kui. Cho » Sun, 29 Oct 2000 00:47:48


maintance, only /sbin /tmp and /var will mount




> > Thanks, Russ.

> > Another question, is there any difference between their functionality?
So
> far as I know,
> > /sbin/sh is usually used for the root at the single user mode.

> No difference - the reason /sbin/sh is used by root is so it will
> work if the /usr filesystem is unavailable for some reason.

> N

> > --
> > Luke