Temporary No Login

Temporary No Login

Post by Barry Margoli » Fri, 07 Jul 2000 04:00:00





>Hi All,

>Is there any ways an administrator can temporary restrict users logging in
>to the Solaris 2.6???  If so, how do I do it?  Thanks!

man nologin

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Please DON'T copy followups to me -- I'll assume it wasn't posted to the group.

 
 
 

Temporary No Login

Post by Dano Tan » Sat, 08 Jul 2000 04:00:00


Hi All,

Is there any ways an administrator can temporary restrict users logging in
to the Solaris 2.6???  If so, how do I do it?  Thanks!

Dano

 
 
 

Temporary No Login

Post by FooBa » Sat, 08 Jul 2000 04:00:00


Use admintool to set up this user's password field to "Account is locked".

C.


> Hi All,

> Is there any ways an administrator can temporary restrict users logging in
> to the Solaris 2.6???  If so, how do I do it?  Thanks!

> Dano

 
 
 

Temporary No Login

Post by Rich Tee » Sun, 09 Jul 2000 04:00:00



> Use admintool to set up this user's password field to "Account is locked".

Admintool?!  What is this - an NT newsgroup?  ;-)

Methinks that "passwd -l <username>" would be faster and easier.

--
Rich Teer

NT tries to do almost everything UNIX does, but fails - miserably.

The use of Windoze cripples the mind; its use should, therefore, be
regarded as a criminal offence.  (With apologies to Edsger W. Dijkstra)

Voice: +1 (250) 979-1638
URL: http://www.rite-online.net

 
 
 

Temporary No Login

Post by Stilga » Sun, 09 Jul 2000 04:00:00


create /etc/nologin

that will only allow the root user to logon
to restrict particular users look at the other answers


> Hi All,

> Is there any ways an administrator can temporary restrict users logging in
> to the Solaris 2.6???  If so, how do I do it?  Thanks!

> Dano

 
 
 

1. To use temporary files or not to use temporary files?

This is a repost with Subject line changed:

It is very sad to see that Brian Kernighan and Rob Pike uses temporary
files in the example. I think the temporary can be easily and better
avoided in this case. The modified version is provided at the end. If you
believe the modified version is not better, I would like to hear it.
I make a lot of effort not to use temporary files in my shell scripts,
I do not know if I am alone in this.

And I do not see the value of saving the the original file in the
script:

cp $file $old    # save original file

In "The UNIX Programming Environment", Brian Kernighan and Rob Pike provide

#!/bin/ksh
# overwrite:  copy standard input to output after EOF
# modified version

opath=$PATH
PATH=/bin:/usr/bin

case $# in
0|1)    echo 'Usage: overwrite file cmd [args]' 1>&2; exit 2
esac

file=$1; shift


then
        trap '' 1 2 15   # we are committed; ignore signals
        print -r -- "$new" >  $file
else
        echo "overwrite: $1 failed, $file unchanged" 1>&2
        exit 1
fi

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3. Not Available these Signal nos on Linux

4. NFS installation woes

5. CD-RW: CDFS? Unstable dev nos?

6. HP Toner Cartridges

7. NOS shootout

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9. faster NOS: NetWare or Linux?

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