For Developers: Difference between Solaris and Linux

For Developers: Difference between Solaris and Linux

Post by C. J. Cleg » Thu, 13 Apr 2006 01:26:17



I have considerable experience developing for Linux and VxWorks,
including complex multi-threaded and multi-processor applications, but
no experience at all with developing for Solaris.

I need to know if my Linux experience is directly transportable to
Solaris, or if there are sufficient differences to make the jump
non-trivial.

Now I am quite confident that the transformation would be easy, but I
had a very frustrating experience today with a thoroughly clueless
agency recruiter who had no idea what Solaris and Unix and Linux are
but took it upon herself to assume that none of my Linux background
was applicable to her Solaris requirement.

I could use some ammo for the next time I have to try to deal with
some imbecile who doesn't know her *from third base.  :-(

Maybe there's more to the transition than I think... any guidance out
there?

Thanks...

 
 
 

For Developers: Difference between Solaris and Linux

Post by Oscar del Ri » Thu, 13 Apr 2006 02:22:17



> Maybe there's more to the transition than I think... any guidance out
> there?

Download and install Solaris 10 x86, it comes with the gcc compilers that
you are probably familiar with (they are installed in /usr/sfw/bin) and
download the Sun Studio compilers that are also free.

"Port" some of your programs to Solaris, using both gcc and Sun compilers.
If you have dynamic libraries, learn how to build them in Solaris and
how/where the runtime linker will look for them (man ld; man ld.so.1)...

 
 
 

For Developers: Difference between Solaris and Linux

Post by Rich Tee » Thu, 13 Apr 2006 02:42:20



> I have considerable experience developing for Linux and VxWorks,
> including complex multi-threaded and multi-processor applications, but
> no experience at all with developing for Solaris.

> I need to know if my Linux experience is directly transportable to
> Solaris, or if there are sufficient differences to make the jump
> non-trivial.

I'm no Linux expert, but I suspect that most of what you know is
transportable to Solaris.  Little things like the file system
hierarchy, the location of some header files, the default compiler,
and the availability of some "extension" functions, and so on might
catch you out, but most of the APIs are pretty much the same.

Quote:> Maybe there's more to the transition than I think... any guidance out
> there?

There's some docs on Sun's web site (start at docs.sun.com), and my
book, Solaris Systems Programming, might also help.  For more info
on the latter, see www.rite-group.com/rich/ssp.

HTH,

--
Rich Teer, SCNA, SCSA, OpenSolaris CAB member

President,
Rite Online Inc.

Voice: +1 (250) 979-1638
URL: http://www.rite-group.com/rich

 
 
 

For Developers: Difference between Solaris and Linux

Post by Ian Collin » Thu, 13 Apr 2006 04:33:24



> I have considerable experience developing for Linux and VxWorks,
> including complex multi-threaded and multi-processor applications, but
> no experience at all with developing for Solaris.

> I need to know if my Linux experience is directly transportable to
> Solaris, or if there are sufficient differences to make the jump
> non-trivial.

I've gone the other way a couple of times and I've found the domain
knowledge more important than the OS knowledge.  So if your expertise is
in mutli-threaded and MP applications programming, you will find it
caries over friarly easily to Solaris.  The hard part will be going back
once you have gotten used to the Solaris tools!

Search for the multi-threaded programming guide on docs.sun.com.

--
Ian Collins.

 
 
 

For Developers: Difference between Solaris and Linux

Post by Bruno Hert » Thu, 13 Apr 2006 05:12:39



Quote:> I have considerable experience developing for Linux and VxWorks,
> including complex multi-threaded and multi-processor applications, but
> no experience at all with developing for Solaris.

> I need to know if my Linux experience is directly transportable to
> Solaris, or if there are sufficient differences to make the jump
> non-trivial.

> Now I am quite confident that the transformation would be easy, but I
> had a very frustrating experience today with a thoroughly clueless
> agency recruiter who had no idea what Solaris and Unix and Linux are
> but took it upon herself to assume that none of my Linux background
> was applicable to her Solaris requirement.

> I could use some ammo for the next time I have to try to deal with
> some imbecile who doesn't know her *from third base.  :-(

> Maybe there's more to the transition than I think... any guidance out
> there?

Depends on the application type and what tools you're going to work
with. Sun's compiler,de*,make differ from gcc/gdb/gmake, so you
might have to become acquainted with them. Performance and library
debugging (tools) are different. Also, some Linux developers are used
to rely on gcc/glib extensions without even knowing, so they're
usually in for a surprise. Then some interfaces differ, e.g. STREAMS
programming is something you presumably won't know from Linux, and GUI
development is ususally done in Motif (or Java these days). Software
packaging and other stuff surrounding and relating to development
differ, e.g. shell scripts are often required to run with the Bourne
resp. Korn shell and not with Bash. It's all those details which can
add up and distinguish the Solaris expert from the Solaris beginner.

That said, of course there are considerable similarities. One handy
buzzword is POSIX, which affects lots of interfaces like networking or
multithreading. If you've done application development on that level,
much of your knowlegde is more or less directly transportable, and you
can explicitly refer to standardized interfaces available on both
systems.

I'd really be cautious though not to advertise myself too much,
depending on the type of contract. It might really take some time
before you get productive on Solaris, and on a short term contract
that could lead to an embarassing experience. Best thing to do really
is download and install Solaris and Sun compilers yourself and check
out how comfortable you are.

Regards, Bruno.

 
 
 

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