automount questions...

automount questions...

Post by Jeremy Wils » Thu, 30 Apr 1998 04:00:00



I'm trying to set up an automount for the home directories from a remote NFS
machine to a Solaris 2.5.1 box.

It's not working.  The /etc/auto_home files are correct and I can manually
mount the remote partition no problem, so what else should I be doing here?  
The man pages are useless...

--

Wonder what's inside my wallet? http://www.inforamp.net/~xeno/wallet

 
 
 

automount questions...

Post by Rainer Hur » Fri, 01 May 1998 04:00:00


: I'm trying to set up an automount for the home directories from a remote NFS
: machine to a Solaris 2.5.1 box.

: It's not working.  The /etc/auto_home files are correct and I can manually
: mount the remote partition no problem, so what else should I be doing here?  
: The man pages are useless...
:  

Works fine for me here. Can you supply more detailed information (what does your
auto_master and auto_home files look like, how do you start automountd, etc.).

Rainer

--


 
 
 

automount questions...

Post by Tony Curti » Fri, 01 May 1998 04:00:00



Jeremy> I'm trying to set up an automount for the home
Jeremy> directories from a remote NFS machine to a Solaris
Jeremy> 2.5.1 box.

Jeremy> It's not working.  The /etc/auto_home files are
Jeremy> correct and I can manually mount the remote
Jeremy> partition no problem, so what else should I be doing
Jeremy> here?  The man pages are useless...

Is automountd running?
(the remote share sounds correct)
is /etc/nsswitch.conf correct for "files" automount?
What's in /etc/auto_master?

--
Tony Curtis, Systems Manager, VCPC,      | Tel +43 1 310 93 96 - 12; Fax - 13
Liechtensteinstrasse 22, A-1090 Wien, AT | http://www.vcpc.univie.ac.at/

"You see? You see? Your stupid minds! Stupid! Stupid!" ~ Eros, Plan9 fOS.

 
 
 

automount questions...

Post by Casper H.S. Dik - Network Security Engine » Sun, 03 May 1998 04:00:00


[[ PLEASE DON'T SEND ME EMAIL COPIES OF POSTINGS ]]


>I'm trying to set up an automount for the home directories from a remote NFS
>machine to a Solaris 2.5.1 box.
>It's not working.  The /etc/auto_home files are correct and I can manually
>mount the remote partition no problem, so what else should I be doing here?  
>The man pages are useless...

Checked /etc/auto_master and nsswitch.conf?

Casper
--
Expressed in this posting are my opinions.  They are in no way related
to opinions held by my employer, Sun Microsystems.
Statements on Sun products included here are not gospel and may
be fiction rather than truth.

 
 
 

automount questions...

Post by Frederic Vecove » Tue, 05 May 1998 04:00:00



> [[ PLEASE DON'T SEND ME EMAIL COPIES OF POSTINGS ]]


> >I'm trying to set up an automount for the home directories from a remote NFS
> >machine to a Solaris 2.5.1 box.

> >It's not working.  The /etc/auto_home files are correct and I can manually
> >mount the remote partition no problem, so what else should I be doing here?
> >The man pages are useless...

> Checked /etc/auto_master and nsswitch.conf?

Check permission of /etc/auto_*. If executable, automount uses the file
as a script that is supposed to output to stdout the list of filesystems
to mount. (I am not 100% sure, but I think that automount file is 755 on
Solaris)

-Fred

--
Frederic Vecoven              Office: +32-16-390.748
 VLSI engineer                Fax:    +32-16-390.600
                              Home:   +32-4-367.20.86
Philips ITCL                  GSM:    +32-75-529.043


 
 
 

automount questions...

Post by David Ann » Wed, 06 May 1998 04:00:00


On Mon, 04 May 1998 11:26:26 +0200, Frederic Vecoven



>> [[ PLEASE DON'T SEND ME EMAIL COPIES OF POSTINGS ]]


>> >I'm trying to set up an automount for the home directories from a remote NFS
>> >machine to a Solaris 2.5.1 box.

>> >It's not working.  The /etc/auto_home files are correct and I can manually
>> >mount the remote partition no problem, so what else should I be doing here?
>> >The man pages are useless...

>> Checked /etc/auto_master and nsswitch.conf?

>Check permission of /etc/auto_*. If executable, automount uses the file
>as a script that is supposed to output to stdout the list of filesystems
>to mount. (I am not 100% sure, but I think that automount file is 755 on
>Solaris)

>-Fred

Is automountd running? It only starts at boot time if there is
something to automount. The first time you add something to
/etc/auto_home, you also need to issue the "automount" command.
***************************************************************
** Dave Annis            *  With age comes wisdom,           **
** Kohler Co.            *  if you stay awake along the way. **
***************************************************************
 
 
 

automount questions...

Post by Casper H.S. Dik - Network Security Engine » Thu, 07 May 1998 04:00:00


[[ PLEASE DON'T SEND ME EMAIL COPIES OF POSTINGS ]]


>Is automountd running? It only starts at boot time if there is
>something to automount. The first time you add something to
>/etc/auto_home, you also need to issue the "automount" command.

The automount command will just tell automountd to re-read the files;
if auto_master is absent and there's no auto_master map/table, then I'd
think automountd will not start.  But the default configurations supplies
those.

Casper
--
Expressed in this posting are my opinions.  They are in no way related
to opinions held by my employer, Sun Microsystems.
Statements on Sun products included here are not gospel and may
be fiction rather than truth.

 
 
 

automount questions...

Post by Reinier Pos » Thu, 07 May 1998 04:00:00


Quote:>Is automountd running? It only starts at boot time if there is
>something to automount. The first time you add something to
>/etc/auto_home, you also need to issue the "automount" command.

It doesn't hurt to issue /usr/sbin/automount -v at every change.
Some changes won't be correctly recognised even then.  I sometimes
have to umount an automounted filesystem explicitly before automount -v
will notice any change and remount it.  (This is under Solaris 2.5.1.)

--
Reinier

 
 
 

automount questions...

Post by Casper H.S. Dik - Network Security Engine » Thu, 07 May 1998 04:00:00


[[ PLEASE DON'T SEND ME EMAIL COPIES OF POSTINGS ]]


>It doesn't hurt to issue /usr/sbin/automount -v at every change.
>Some changes won't be correctly recognised even then.  I sometimes
>have to umount an automounted filesystem explicitly before automount -v
>will notice any change and remount it.  (This is under Solaris 2.5.1.)

Automount will not unmount filesystems when maps are changed; atleast,
not until it's unmounted automatically.

(When an automounted fs is mounted, it's likely that it's busy and can;t
be unmounted)
--
Expressed in this posting are my opinions.  They are in no way related
to opinions held by my employer, Sun Microsystems.
Statements on Sun products included here are not gospel and may
be fiction rather than truth.

 
 
 

automount questions...

Post by Reinier Pos » Tue, 12 May 1998 04:00:00



>[[ PLEASE DON'T SEND ME EMAIL COPIES OF POSTINGS ]]


>>It doesn't hurt to issue /usr/sbin/automount -v at every change.
>>Some changes won't be correctly recognised even then.  I sometimes
>>have to umount an automounted filesystem explicitly before automount -v
>>will notice any change and remount it.  (This is under Solaris 2.5.1.)

>Automount will not unmount filesystems when maps are changed; atleast,
>not until it's unmounted automatically.

>(When an automounted fs is mounted, it's likely that it's busy and can;t
>be unmounted)

The behaviour is reasonable, but it confused me initially:

                                # directory $d was automounted as $a

root# ls -l $a/.                # lists the contents
root# rm -rf $d; mkdir $d; touch $d/this_is_a_new_file
root# ls -l $a/.                # still lists the old contents!
root# umount $d
root# ls -l $a/.                # now lists $a/this_is_a_new_file

--
Reinier

 
 
 

1. automount question

folks

i wish to use automountd but have a question about how to have the
automounted directory to be read-only when the disk that mount sits is
mounted read-write.

i have a large local partition (/dev/hda2) mounted read-write on /export
which has the following

     /export/opt
     /export/home

i intend those dirs to be automounted as:

     /export/opt     on /opt
     /export/home    on /home

however, because the home directories of the local users are on this
disk, i need /dev/hda2 mounted as read-write, but i would like a way to
have the other two mount points, when automounted, to be read-only.  is
there a way to do this?

the automount cfg is as follows:

     # /etc/auto.master
         /home       /etc/auto.home
         /opt        /etc/auto.opt

     # /etc/auto.home
         *  :/export/home/&

     # /etc/auto.opt
         *  -ro,soft  :/export/opt/&

when anything is automounted onto /opt (such as /opt/gnome), it appears
that i am still able to write /opt/gnome and indeed 'mount' reports that
/opt/gome/ is mounted rw.

i'm using autofs 3.1.7 on a 2.4.19 box with glibc 2.2.5 if thats of any
help.

additionally, is it correct for the automount point (ie /opt in my case)
only list the dirs that have been automounted?

any thoughts would be appreciated
regrds
ray

2. logrotate won't

3. SMC EtherEZ card ISA 1660 series

4. automount questions

5. 4 in 1 (print/fax/scan/copy) under Linux ?

6. automount question

7. Newbie setup info for via-rhine.o module for net card. . .

8. Automount question

9. Automounting Question

10. automount question