Determining Flexlm Vendor TCP port numbers

Determining Flexlm Vendor TCP port numbers

Post by B. Joshua Rose » Thu, 13 Mar 2003 03:21:49



How do I determine the TCP port number of a flexlm vendor daemon on
Solaris?. On Linux netstat -l -p does the trick but the Solaris version
doesn't support those switches. I tried netstat -a but it doesn't show
any of the flexlm port numbers.
 
 
 

Determining Flexlm Vendor TCP port numbers

Post by Darren Dunha » Thu, 13 Mar 2003 03:40:46



Quote:> How do I determine the TCP port number of a flexlm vendor daemon on
> Solaris?. On Linux netstat -l -p does the trick but the Solaris version
> doesn't support those switches. I tried netstat -a but it doesn't show
> any of the flexlm port numbers.

You could install 'lsof', but if you're running Solaris 8 or higher, the
easiest thing would be to run 'pfiles <PID>' where you give the PID of
the flexlm daemon.

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Determining Flexlm Vendor TCP port numbers

Post by B. Joshua Rose » Thu, 13 Mar 2003 04:29:44




>> How do I determine the TCP port number of a flexlm vendor daemon on
>> Solaris?. On Linux netstat -l -p does the trick but the Solaris version
>> doesn't support those switches. I tried netstat -a but it doesn't show
>> any of the flexlm port numbers.

> You could install 'lsof', but if you're running Solaris 8 or higher, the
> easiest thing would be to run 'pfiles <PID>' where you give the PID of
> the flexlm daemon.

Tried pfiles, got a permission denied error, do you have to be root to
run pfiles?
 
 
 

Determining Flexlm Vendor TCP port numbers

Post by Darren Dunha » Thu, 13 Mar 2003 04:43:55





>>> How do I determine the TCP port number of a flexlm vendor daemon on
>>> Solaris?. On Linux netstat -l -p does the trick but the Solaris version
>>> doesn't support those switches. I tried netstat -a but it doesn't show
>>> any of the flexlm port numbers.

>> You could install 'lsof', but if you're running Solaris 8 or higher, the
>> easiest thing would be to run 'pfiles <PID>' where you give the PID of
>> the flexlm daemon.

> Tried pfiles, got a permission denied error, do you have to be root to
> run pfiles?

pfiles can expose information about what a process is doing that would
otherwise be hidden.  So you must have permission to examine the
process.  That means either running as root or the process owner.

'lsof' would have the same limitations.  Of course the machine
administrator could make either utility setuid root.

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Got some Dr Pepper?                           San Francisco, CA bay area
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1. Determine TCP Port Number for a Telnet Session

Scenario: I have users on dumb terminals telneting to an AIX system
through a (3Com) terminal server. The terminal server has one IP
address and it has 48 ports. I need to find out which physical port on
the terminal server the user is coming from.

The telnet session uses port 23 to communicate with the host but the
host communicates with the terminal server using a different port
number for each physical port. See output of netstat -n -finet below.
The who -m command shows the IP number of the terminal server. How do I
find out which port number the session is using? How do I determine
which line in the netstat -n -finet display refers to me? I can't grep
on the IP number for the terminal server because there may be multiple
sessions with that same IP number, depending on how many terminals are
currently teleneted into this host.

Any ideas?

======================================

# oslevel
4.3.2.0
# who -m
root        pts/8       May 11 13:28    (204.115.89.116)
# netstat -n -finet | head -16
Active Internet connections
Proto Recv-Q Send-Q  Local Address          Foreign Address
(state)
tcp4       0      0  198.179.208.3.23       204.115.89.194.1039
ESTABLISHED
tcp4       0      0  198.179.208.3.23       204.115.89.116.1025
ESTABLISHED
tcp4       0      2  198.179.208.3.23       198.179.208.8.1383
ESTABLISHED
tcp4       0      0  198.179.208.3.23       204.115.89.111.1028
ESTABLISHED
tcp4       0      0  198.179.208.3.23       198.179.208.111.1070
ESTABLISHED
tcp4       0      0  198.179.208.3.23       204.115.90.103.1044
ESTABLISHED
tcp4       0      0  198.179.208.3.23       192.168.128.139.1043
ESTABLISHED
tcp4       0      0  198.179.208.3.23       204.115.92.136.1025
ESTABLISHED
tcp4       0      0  198.179.208.3.23       192.168.100.219.1025
ESTABLISHED
tcp4       0      0  198.179.208.3.23       204.115.89.145.1025
ESTABLISHED
tcp4       0      0  198.179.208.3.23       204.115.88.17.14353
ESTABLISHED
tcp4       0      0  198.179.208.3.23       204.115.89.109.1025
ESTABLISHED
tcp4       0      0  198.179.208.3.23       204.115.89.116.1027
ESTABLISHED
tcp4       0      0  198.179.208.3.23       204.115.88.138.1025
ESTABLISHED
#

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