it's been toooo long

it's been toooo long

Post by m0ng » Sat, 13 Oct 2001 23:59:10



All,

My apologies up front for the simplisty of this question, but I've been
away from the admin thing for far too long.

I'm running Solaris 2.7/Sparc and would like someone to help refresh my
memory...where are the environment variables for the root account
defined at? I know for normal users the .profile contains the desired
settings, but I do not find a .profile file in root's HOME. Specifically
what I want to do is set the PATH variable and UMASK. BTW, I did check
the /etc/default directory, but didn't see anything that appeared to
address my question.

Many thanks,
m0ng0

 
 
 

it's been toooo long

Post by Tony Walto » Sun, 14 Oct 2001 00:17:46



> I know for normal users the .profile contains the desired
> settings, but I do not find a .profile file in root's HOME.

So create one.  There isn't a /.profile by default.

Regards
--
Tony

 
 
 

it's been toooo long

Post by Graeme Hinchliff » Sun, 14 Oct 2001 00:34:25




Quote:> All,

> My apologies up front for the simplisty of this question, but I've been
> away from the admin thing for far too long.

> I'm running Solaris 2.7/Sparc and would like someone to help refresh my
> memory...where are the environment variables for the root account
> defined at? I know for normal users the .profile contains the desired
> settings, but I do not find a .profile file in root's HOME. Specifically
> what I want to do is set the PATH variable and UMASK. BTW, I did check
> the /etc/default directory, but didn't see anything that appeared to
> address my question.

> Many thanks,
> m0ng0

.profile is for bash I believe.  When I want to set PATh variables I edit

/etc/default/login
and
/etc/default/su

These set the PATH's no matter what shell it would appear.

Graeme Hinchliffe

 
 
 

it's been toooo long

Post by Kumar » Sun, 14 Oct 2001 01:51:08


Considering root normally uses /sbin/sh , you have at least two options, the
first being the preferred one

1) Create a .profile in / and add what you need in there

2) Modify /etc/profile since this gets read for some shells including sh,
bash and ksh

To set path taking into account whatever is there by default you do

PATH=$PATH:/whatever/you/need
exxport PATH

IF you want only your settings to be in the PATH then do

PATH=/whatever/you/want:/whatever/you/need
export PATH

Add the following line in .profile, with your preferred values, to set
umask; eg:

umask 022

Arv

: All,

: My apologies up front for the simplisty of this question, but I've been
: away from the admin thing for far too long.

: I'm running Solaris 2.7/Sparc and would like someone to help refresh my
: memory...where are the environment variables for the root account
: defined at? I know for normal users the .profile contains the desired
: settings, but I do not find a .profile file in root's HOME. Specifically
: what I want to do is set the PATH variable and UMASK. BTW, I did check
: the /etc/default directory, but didn't see anything that appeared to
: address my question.

: Many thanks,
: m0ng0

 
 
 

it's been toooo long

Post by Griff Mille » Sun, 14 Oct 2001 04:32:27



> All,

> My apologies up front for the simplisty of this question, but I've been
> away from the admin thing for far too long.

> I'm running Solaris 2.7/Sparc and would like someone to help refresh my
> memory...where are the environment variables for the root account
> defined at? I know for normal users the .profile contains the desired
> settings, but I do not find a .profile file in root's HOME. Specifically
> what I want to do is set the PATH variable and UMASK. BTW, I did check
> the /etc/default directory, but didn't see anything that appeared to
> address my question.

As far as PATH is concerned, grep for SUPATH in /etc/default/* .

--
Griff Miller II                   |                                           |
Manager of Information Technology | "Do Lipton employees take coffee breaks?" |
Positron Corporation              |                                           |

 
 
 

it's been toooo long

Post by Igor Sobrad » Sun, 14 Oct 2001 19:02:43



> .profile is for bash I believe.

It is not exactly. BASH reads $HOME/.bash_profile and, if this file is not
available, $HOME/.profile. Bourne Shell reads $HOME/.profile

Quote:> When I want to set PATh variables I edit
> /etc/default/login
> and
> /etc/default/su
> These set the PATH's no matter what shell it would appear.

I prefer to avoid these global changes. If the system has not a lot of
users it is better to change their $HOME/.profile scripts or to provide
them with a right default profile in /etc/skel.

Cheers,
Igor.

--

 
 
 

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