Basic Netwoking

Basic Netwoking

Post by Domini » Wed, 12 Mar 2003 22:44:27



Hi,

I'm aware that many people have asked many variants of this problem, but
I just can't seem to find the info I need to configure my linux box
properly.

I have three windows boxes(98,XP,XP) each with a configured network card
and one linux box (Mandrake 8.1)with 3 network cards all configured and
working properly.

                              ----------------
Win1 192.168.0.10 -----------|192.168.0.1
Win2 192.168.1.10 -----------|192.168.1.1 linux box
Win3 192.168.2.10 -----------|192.168.2.1
                              ----------------
All subnetmasks set to 255.255.255.0
I can ping the linux box from any of the three windows machines, and I
can shh into the linux box from any of the windows machines, and then
from there ping all of the windows machines.

What I want to do is to get the windows boxes to talk to each other. I
am not sure if this is called IP forwarding, Network bridging, Routing,
or none of the above, hence needing to ask for help.

I have a very vague awareness of where the config files are in linux,
and how to edit them, so I would really appreciate simple answers or
references.
Also what do I have to set the default gateway on the windows boxes to?

Many many thanks

Dominic

 
 
 

Basic Netwoking

Post by Mitt » Thu, 13 Mar 2003 00:42:06



> Hi,

> I'm aware that many people have asked many variants of this problem, but
> I just can't seem to find the info I need to configure my linux box
> properly.

> I have three windows boxes(98,XP,XP) each with a configured network card
> and one linux box (Mandrake 8.1)with 3 network cards all configured and
> working properly.

>                               ----------------
> Win1 192.168.0.10 -----------|192.168.0.1
> Win2 192.168.1.10 -----------|192.168.1.1 linux box
> Win3 192.168.2.10 -----------|192.168.2.1
>                               ----------------
> All subnetmasks set to 255.255.255.0
> I can ping the linux box from any of the three windows machines, and I
> can shh into the linux box from any of the windows machines, and then
> from there ping all of the windows machines.

> What I want to do is to get the windows boxes to talk to each other. I
> am not sure if this is called IP forwarding, Network bridging, Routing,
> or none of the above, hence needing to ask for help.

> I have a very vague awareness of where the config files are in linux,
> and how to edit them, so I would really appreciate simple answers or
> references.
> Also what do I have to set the default gateway on the windows boxes to?

> Many many thanks

> Dominic

Is it your intention to have three separate subnets?  Or are you trying to
set up a small single network?  If the former, then you have a routing
problem and need to set up routes in your Linux box that directs packets
to the appropriate subnet (card).  If the latter, then your easiest
solution is to get a (cheap) hub, connect all four boxes to it and
configure each to be in the same subnet.  Then no special routing is
needed.

Mitty

 
 
 

Basic Netwoking

Post by Rod Smi » Thu, 13 Mar 2003 00:54:00




Quote:> Hi,

> I'm aware that many people have asked many variants of this problem, but
> I just can't seem to find the info I need to configure my linux box
> properly.

> I have three windows boxes(98,XP,XP) each with a configured network card
> and one linux box (Mandrake 8.1)with 3 network cards all configured and
> working properly.

>                               ----------------
> Win1 192.168.0.10 -----------|192.168.0.1
> Win2 192.168.1.10 -----------|192.168.1.1 linux box
> Win3 192.168.2.10 -----------|192.168.2.1
>                               ----------------
> All subnetmasks set to 255.255.255.0

Why do you have three NICs in the Linux box? Given what you say you want
to do, a much simpler configuration would be to put one NIC in each box
and connect them together via a hub or switch. Give them all IP addresses
on the same subnet (say, 192.168.0.0/24), and the Windows boxes can then
talk to each other directly, without using the Linux box as a gateway.

Quote:> What I want to do is to get the windows boxes to talk to each other. I
> am not sure if this is called IP forwarding, Network bridging, Routing,
> or none of the above, hence needing to ask for help.

IP forwarding and routing are basically the same. Bridging is a bit
different. Either will work in this case, but as I say, they aren't really
needed if you simplify your configuration. If you really really want to do
it with the physical connections you've got now, type this command in
Linux:

echo "1" > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/ip_forward

You can add this command to a network startup script to make it persistent
across reboots. (Most distributions store an option in a configuration
file somewhere that'll enable it, but I don't recall offhand what it is
for Mandrake 8.1.) You'll also need to tell each of your Windows boxes
that the Linux box is the gateway system.

--

http://www.rodsbooks.com
Author of books on Linux, networking, & multi-OS configuration

 
 
 

Basic Netwoking

Post by Domini » Thu, 13 Mar 2003 00:55:48




>>Hi,

>>I'm aware that many people have asked many variants of this problem, but
>>I just can't seem to find the info I need to configure my linux box
>>properly.

>>I have three windows boxes(98,XP,XP) each with a configured network card
>>and one linux box (Mandrake 8.1)with 3 network cards all configured and
>>working properly.

>>                              ----------------
>>Win1 192.168.0.10 -----------|192.168.0.1
>>Win2 192.168.1.10 -----------|192.168.1.1 linux box
>>Win3 192.168.2.10 -----------|192.168.2.1
>>                              ----------------
>>All subnetmasks set to 255.255.255.0
>>I can ping the linux box from any of the three windows machines, and I
>>can shh into the linux box from any of the windows machines, and then
>>from there ping all of the windows machines.

>>What I want to do is to get the windows boxes to talk to each other. I
>>am not sure if this is called IP forwarding, Network bridging, Routing,
>>or none of the above, hence needing to ask for help.

>>I have a very vague awareness of where the config files are in linux,
>>and how to edit them, so I would really appreciate simple answers or
>>references.
>>Also what do I have to set the default gateway on the windows boxes to?

>>Many many thanks

>>Dominic

> Is it your intention to have three separate subnets?  Or are you trying to
> set up a small single network?  If the former, then you have a routing
> problem and need to set up routes in your Linux box that directs packets
> to the appropriate subnet (card).  If the latter, then your easiest
> solution is to get a (cheap) hub, connect all four boxes to it and
> configure each to be in the same subnet.  Then no special routing is
> needed.

> Mitty

I want to do the former (three seperate subnets), basicly to help my
understanding networking. I think that I need to know four things
1) Where are the routing tables in Mandrake
2) What is the format for the routing tables
3) What command restarts the network (I'm working remotly and don't
wan't to reboot the machine)
4) What do I need to set on the windows boxes

Thanks

Dom

 
 
 

Basic Netwoking

Post by jack » Thu, 13 Mar 2003 01:27:58



> I want to do the former (three seperate subnets), basicly to help my
> understanding networking. I think that I need to know four things
> 1) Where are the routing tables in Mandrake
> 2) What is the format for the routing tables
> 3) What command restarts the network (I'm working remotly and don't
> wan't to reboot the machine)
> 4) What do I need to set on the windows boxes

Not quite.

(1) Since every subnet has its own interface on the linux box, this box
already knows how to forward the traffic to the respective destinations.

(2) That depends on who parses them.

(3) Depends on Your distro.

(4) Is the interesting part: On each win box, You need to point one
(perhaps default) route to the corresponding IP of Your linux router.
If this is not the default route, You could go with a netmask of /16,
or add two routes with netmasks of /24.
In this simple setup, You could even use host entries, which would be
a netmask of /32.

And, as others have said already, You probably need to enable ip for-
warding on the linux router.

Cheers, Jack.

--
----------------------------------------------------------------------
My personal reading of the string "MicroSoft" expands to "NanoWeak"...

 
 
 

Basic Netwoking

Post by Domini » Thu, 13 Mar 2003 01:50:03




>> I want to do the former (three seperate subnets), basicly to help my
>> understanding networking. I think that I need to know four things
>> 1) Where are the routing tables in Mandrake
>> 2) What is the format for the routing tables
>> 3) What command restarts the network (I'm working remotly and don't
>> wan't to reboot the machine)
>> 4) What do I need to set on the windows boxes

> Not quite.

> (1) Since every subnet has its own interface on the linux box, this box
> already knows how to forward the traffic to the respective destinations.

> (2) That depends on who parses them.

> (3) Depends on Your distro.

> (4) Is the interesting part: On each win box, You need to point one
> (perhaps default) route to the corresponding IP of Your linux router.
> If this is not the default route, You could go with a netmask of /16,
> or add two routes with netmasks of /24.
> In this simple setup, You could even use host entries, which would be
> a netmask of /32.

> And, as others have said already, You probably need to enable ip for-
> warding on the linux router.

> Cheers, Jack.

in my /etc/sysconfig/network there is the line
FORWARD_IPV4="yes"

I believe hat this means that IP forwarding is on. I have tried to set
the default gateway on each window box as the IP address of the of the
linux box on the particular subnet that that windows box is on, but I
still can't ping one window box with another.

I have been reading somthing on the net about the setting of the gateway
on the linux box, somthing to do with having to have the IP address of
the form x.x.x.254 because 254 is special. But as I have three different
  subnets (x.x.0.x and x.x.1.x and x.x.2.x) hence I don't know what I
should put  as the default gateway in the linux box.

Thanks

Dom

 
 
 

Basic Netwoking

Post by Henning Follman » Thu, 13 Mar 2003 03:27:44





> >> I want to do the former (three seperate subnets), basicly to help
> >> my understanding networking. I think that I need to know four
> >> things 1) Where are the routing tables in Mandrake 2) What is the
> >> format for the routing tables

man route

Quote:> >> 3) What command restarts the network (I'm working remotly and
> >> don't wan't to reboot the machine)

Hey we are doing linux not WinXX. Why do you want to restart? :-)

Quote:> >> 4) What do I need to set on the windows boxes

I would setup a DHCP server on your linux box. So your clients will be
configured automagically.

Quote:

[...]

> in my /etc/sysconfig/network there is the line FORWARD_IPV4="yes"

what does
cat /proc/sys/net/ipv4/ip_forward
say? should be 1, then forwarding is on.

Quote:

> I believe hat this means that IP forwarding is on. I have tried to
> set the default gateway on each window box as the IP address of the
> of the linux box on the particular subnet that that windows box is
> on, but I still can't ping one window box with another.

> I have been reading somthing on the net about the setting of the
> gateway on the linux box, somthing to do with having to have the IP
> address of the form x.x.x.254 because 254 is special. But as I have
> three different subnets (x.x.0.x and x.x.1.x and x.x.2.x) hence I
> don't know what I should put as the default gateway in the linux
> box.

the default should be the host/net where everything you did not
define should go to (the default so to say).

HTH

Henning

--

it consulting    | http://www.itcfollmann.com

 
 
 

Basic Netwoking

Post by Domini » Thu, 13 Mar 2003 21:44:13





>>Hi,

>>I'm aware that many people have asked many variants of this problem, but
>>I just can't seem to find the info I need to configure my linux box
>>properly.

>>I have three windows boxes(98,XP,XP) each with a configured network card
>>and one linux box (Mandrake 8.1)with 3 network cards all configured and
>>working properly.

>>                              ----------------
>>Win1 192.168.0.10 -----------|192.168.0.1
>>Win2 192.168.1.10 -----------|192.168.1.1 linux box
>>Win3 192.168.2.10 -----------|192.168.2.1
>>                              ----------------
>>All subnetmasks set to 255.255.255.0

> Why do you have three NICs in the Linux box? Given what you say you want
> to do, a much simpler configuration would be to put one NIC in each box
> and connect them together via a hub or switch. Give them all IP addresses
> on the same subnet (say, 192.168.0.0/24), and the Windows boxes can then
> talk to each other directly, without using the Linux box as a gateway.

>>What I want to do is to get the windows boxes to talk to each other. I
>>am not sure if this is called IP forwarding, Network bridging, Routing,
>>or none of the above, hence needing to ask for help.

> IP forwarding and routing are basically the same. Bridging is a bit
> different. Either will work in this case, but as I say, they aren't really
> needed if you simplify your configuration. If you really really want to do
> it with the physical connections you've got now, type this command in
> Linux:

> echo "1" > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/ip_forward

> You can add this command to a network startup script to make it persistent
> across reboots. (Most distributions store an option in a configuration
> file somewhere that'll enable it, but I don't recall offhand what it is
> for Mandrake 8.1.) You'll also need to tell each of your Windows boxes
> that the Linux box is the gateway system.

IP forwarding is on, and the default gateway for the windows boxes is
the linux box, but I still can't ping from one windows box to another.
Is there anywhere on the linux system that logs are kept, so that I
might be able to see where the failure is when I try to ping through the
box.
Just to help my understanding, I want to explain what it is I think I am
doing, and then maybe somone could correct me.

Win1 (192.168.0.10)            ----------------
GateW(192.168.0.1)  -----------|192.168.0.1
                                |
Win2 (192.168.1.10)            |
GateW(192.168.1.1)  -----------|192.168.1.1  linux box
                                |
Win3 (192.168.2.10)            |
GateW(192.168.2.1)  -----------|192.168.2.1
                                ----------------
All Subnet masks 255.255.255.0

Say Win1 wants to talk to the linux box, it knows its on the same
network, so it just send IP packets with to (192.168.0.1)
If Win1 wants to talk to Win2, its not on the same network, so it looks
up the default gateway which is the linux box on (192.168.0.1), and then
sends out the IP packets with headers (192.168.1.10) to (192.168.0.1),
the linux box recieves these, and then knows that they are not for it,
but are to be forwarded to (192.169.1.10), so it sends them out from
(192.168.1.1) to Win2.

What should the linux box think the default gateway is (Ie it is the
default gateway???)

If I ping an internet address from Win1 eg google (216.239.33.101)
whilst I have a dial up connection established on Win1, how does that
box know  not to use the Gateway on the Lan (192.168.0.1) but use the
gateway at the end of the modem instead?

Hope that my questions make sence

Many thanks for everones help so far.

Dom

 
 
 

Basic Netwoking

Post by Rod Smi » Thu, 13 Mar 2003 23:54:02







>>>I have three windows boxes(98,XP,XP) each with a configured network card
>>>and one linux box (Mandrake 8.1)with 3 network cards all configured and
>>>working properly.

>>>                              ----------------
>>>Win1 192.168.0.10 -----------|192.168.0.1
>>>Win2 192.168.1.10 -----------|192.168.1.1 linux box
>>>Win3 192.168.2.10 -----------|192.168.2.1
>>>                              ----------------

>> If you really really want to do
>> it with the physical connections you've got now, type this command in
>> Linux:

>> echo "1" > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/ip_forward

> IP forwarding is on, and the default gateway for the windows boxes is
> the linux box, but I still can't ping from one windows box to another.

I suspect that you're mistaken about one of those two things. In Linux,
try typing the following command and report back the results:

cat /proc/sys/net/ipv4/ip_forward

If IP forwarding is enabled, the result will be "1"; if not, it'll be "0".
It's also possible that you've got packet-filter firewall rules set up to
block packets from being routed. Try typing this command to check:

iptables -L

You'll have to be root to use that one. You should see output like this:

Chain INPUT (policy ACCEPT)
target     prot opt source               destination

Chain FORWARD (policy ACCEPT)
target     prot opt source               destination

Chain OUTPUT (policy ACCEPT)
target     prot opt source               destination

If any of the policies (especially FORWARD or OUTPUT) is not ACCEPT, then
the system may be dropping forwarded packets. Likewise if there are a
bunch of rules listed under these policies. If this is the case you'll
need to track down your firewall script and modify it.

Quote:> Is there anywhere on the linux system that logs are kept, so that I
> might be able to see where the failure is when I try to ping through the
> box.

Linux doesn't normally log every packet it receives, although it can be
configured to do so with the help of various tools (iptables, Snort,
etc.). That said, most Linux log files are in /var/log or its
subdirectories. Chances are they won't help you much in this case, but you
can certainly check them. Try using the "tail" command to view the last
few lines of a log file after performing an action that should produce
logging.

- Show quoted text -

Quote:> Just to help my understanding, I want to explain what it is I think I am
> doing, and then maybe somone could correct me.

> Win1 (192.168.0.10)            ----------------
> GateW(192.168.0.1)  -----------|192.168.0.1
>                                |
> Win2 (192.168.1.10)            |
> GateW(192.168.1.1)  -----------|192.168.1.1  linux box
>                                |
> Win3 (192.168.2.10)            |
> GateW(192.168.2.1)  -----------|192.168.2.1
>                                 ----------------
> All Subnet masks 255.255.255.0

> Say Win1 wants to talk to the linux box, it knows its on the same
> network, so it just send IP packets with to (192.168.0.1)
> If Win1 wants to talk to Win2, its not on the same network, so it looks
> up the default gateway which is the linux box on (192.168.0.1), and then
> sends out the IP packets with headers (192.168.1.10) to (192.168.0.1),
> the linux box recieves these, and then knows that they are not for it,
> but are to be forwarded to (192.169.1.10), so it sends them out from
> (192.168.1.1) to Win2.

That's the way it should work, yes.

Quote:> What should the linux box think the default gateway is (Ie it is the
> default gateway???)

Given the information you've presented, it shouldn't have one. If it's got
another network connection, though (say, to a DSL connection or even a PPP
dialup link), the default gateway would be to it.

Quote:> If I ping an internet address from Win1 eg google (216.239.33.101)
> whilst I have a dial up connection established on Win1, how does that
> box know  not to use the Gateway on the Lan (192.168.0.1) but use the
> gateway at the end of the modem instead?

You didn't say anything about dial-up connections. They're a potential
monkey wrench, particularly on the Windows boxes. I don't know offhand
what Windows does when you establish a dial-up connection. It might
replace the default route, in which case it'd break your connection to
other systems on your LAN, with the possible exception of the Linux box.
In theory, another way to configure it is to make the dial-up
connection's router the default route and to make your Linux box the
route only for the 192.168.x.x addresses. I don't know offhand how you'd
configure Windows to do this.

If the Linux box has an Internet connection, this is much simpler -- but
there is another complication. To let the Windows boxes have access to the
Internet via the Linux gateway, you'd need to enable network address
translation (NAT). You should be able to do this by typing the following
command once the connection is up:

iptables -t nat -A POSTROUTING -o ppp0 -j MASQUERADE

This assumes that it's a PPP connection and that you've only got one PPP
connection. You may also need to load a module by typing "modprobe
iptable_nat" (without the quotes) before typing the above command. Also,
I've never tried to do QUITE this thing, so there may be some factor I'm
overlooking or forgetting.

--

http://www.rodsbooks.com
Author of books on Linux, networking, & multi-OS configuration

 
 
 

Basic Netwoking

Post by Rod Smi » Thu, 13 Mar 2003 23:54:02




Quote:

> I have been reading somthing on the net about the setting of the gateway
> on the linux box, somthing to do with having to have the IP address of
> the form x.x.x.254 because 254 is special.

No, that's not correct. In theory, a router could be any legal IP address.
They're frequently at the x.x.x.1 address (as you've configured your Linux
box), but that's not a requirement. Certainly x.x.x.254 should work, but
there's no need for you to change it.

--

http://www.rodsbooks.com
Author of books on Linux, networking, & multi-OS configuration

 
 
 

Basic Netwoking

Post by Domini » Fri, 14 Mar 2003 01:19:03


Typical







>>>>I have three windows boxes(98,XP,XP) each with a configured network card
>>>>and one linux box (Mandrake 8.1)with 3 network cards all configured and
>>>>working properly.

>>>>                             ----------------
>>>>Win1 192.168.0.10 -----------|192.168.0.1
>>>>Win2 192.168.1.10 -----------|192.168.1.1 linux box
>>>>Win3 192.168.2.10 -----------|192.168.2.1
>>>>                             ----------------

>>>If you really really want to do
>>>it with the physical connections you've got now, type this command in
>>>Linux:

>>>echo "1" > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/ip_forward

>>IP forwarding is on, and the default gateway for the windows boxes is
>>the linux box, but I still can't ping from one windows box to another.

> I suspect that you're mistaken about one of those two things. In Linux,
> try typing the following command and report back the results:

> cat /proc/sys/net/ipv4/ip_forward

> If IP forwarding is enabled, the result will be "1"; if not, it'll be "0".
> It's also possible that you've got packet-filter firewall rules set up to
> block packets from being routed. Try typing this command to check:

> iptables -L

> You'll have to be root to use that one. You should see output like this:

> Chain INPUT (policy ACCEPT)
> target     prot opt source               destination

> Chain FORWARD (policy ACCEPT)
> target     prot opt source               destination

> Chain OUTPUT (policy ACCEPT)
> target     prot opt source               destination

> If any of the policies (especially FORWARD or OUTPUT) is not ACCEPT, then
> the system may be dropping forwarded packets. Likewise if there are a
> bunch of rules listed under these policies. If this is the case you'll
> need to track down your firewall script and modify it.

>>Is there anywhere on the linux system that logs are kept, so that I
>>might be able to see where the failure is when I try to ping through the
>>box.

> Linux doesn't normally log every packet it receives, although it can be
> configured to do so with the help of various tools (iptables, Snort,
> etc.). That said, most Linux log files are in /var/log or its
> subdirectories. Chances are they won't help you much in this case, but you
> can certainly check them. Try using the "tail" command to view the last
> few lines of a log file after performing an action that should produce
> logging.

>>Just to help my understanding, I want to explain what it is I think I am
>>doing, and then maybe somone could correct me.

>>Win1 (192.168.0.10)            ----------------
>>GateW(192.168.0.1)  -----------|192.168.0.1
>>                               |
>>Win2 (192.168.1.10)            |
>>GateW(192.168.1.1)  -----------|192.168.1.1  linux box
>>                               |
>>Win3 (192.168.2.10)            |
>>GateW(192.168.2.1)  -----------|192.168.2.1
>>                                ----------------
>>All Subnet masks 255.255.255.0

>>Say Win1 wants to talk to the linux box, it knows its on the same
>>network, so it just send IP packets with to (192.168.0.1)
>>If Win1 wants to talk to Win2, its not on the same network, so it looks
>>up the default gateway which is the linux box on (192.168.0.1), and then
>>sends out the IP packets with headers (192.168.1.10) to (192.168.0.1),
>>the linux box recieves these, and then knows that they are not for it,
>>but are to be forwarded to (192.169.1.10), so it sends them out from
>>(192.168.1.1) to Win2.

> That's the way it should work, yes.

>>What should the linux box think the default gateway is (Ie it is the
>>default gateway???)

> Given the information you've presented, it shouldn't have one. If it's got
> another network connection, though (say, to a DSL connection or even a PPP
> dialup link), the default gateway would be to it.

>>If I ping an internet address from Win1 eg google (216.239.33.101)
>>whilst I have a dial up connection established on Win1, how does that
>>box know  not to use the Gateway on the Lan (192.168.0.1) but use the
>>gateway at the end of the modem instead?

> You didn't say anything about dial-up connections. They're a potential
> monkey wrench, particularly on the Windows boxes. I don't know offhand
> what Windows does when you establish a dial-up connection. It might
> replace the default route, in which case it'd break your connection to
> other systems on your LAN, with the possible exception of the Linux box.
> In theory, another way to configure it is to make the dial-up
> connection's router the default route and to make your Linux box the
> route only for the 192.168.x.x addresses. I don't know offhand how you'd
> configure Windows to do this.

> If the Linux box has an Internet connection, this is much simpler -- but
> there is another complication. To let the Windows boxes have access to the
> Internet via the Linux gateway, you'd need to enable network address
> translation (NAT). You should be able to do this by typing the following
> command once the connection is up:

> iptables -t nat -A POSTROUTING -o ppp0 -j MASQUERADE

> This assumes that it's a PPP connection and that you've only got one PPP
> connection. You may also need to load a module by typing "modprobe
> iptable_nat" (without the quotes) before typing the above command. Also,
> I've never tried to do QUITE this thing, so there may be some factor I'm
> overlooking or forgetting.

Thank you everyone for all your help, it apears that the problem was
actualy on the windows boxes. After beating my head against a wall I
noticed that the network card lights were flashing on Win1 when Win2
tried to ping it (through the network), but the ping request was
unanswered. I then tried to ping Win2 from Win3 and that worked.

Win2 - Win3 Pings sucsessfully both ways
Win2 - Win1 Ping Fails
Win3 - Win1 Ping Fails
Win1 - linux Pings sucsessfully both ways
Win2 - linux Pings sucsessfully both ways
Win3 - linux Pings sucsessfully both ways

A quick reinstal of the network card on Win1, and now the ping fails
between Win1 and linux.

I think that a reinstall of Windows is on the cards.

I think that this little episode has proved to me what everyone else
already knows, question the windows part of the network before the linux
part.

Again many many thanks for all the help.

Dominic

 
 
 

Basic Netwoking

Post by Rod Smi » Fri, 14 Mar 2003 12:54:05




Quote:

> Thank you everyone for all your help, it apears that the problem was
> actualy on the windows boxes. After beating my head against a wall I
> noticed that the network card lights were flashing on Win1 when Win2
> tried to ping it (through the network), but the ping request was
> unanswered. I then tried to ping Win2 from Win3 and that worked.

> Win2 - Win3 Pings sucsessfully both ways
> Win2 - Win1 Ping Fails
> Win3 - Win1 Ping Fails
> Win1 - linux Pings sucsessfully both ways
> Win2 - linux Pings sucsessfully both ways
> Win3 - linux Pings sucsessfully both ways

> A quick reinstal of the network card on Win1, and now the ping fails
> between Win1 and linux.

> I think that a reinstall of Windows is on the cards.

It could also be you've got bad hardware. If these NICs are all the same
model, try swapping the card from Win1 into the Linux box and see if it
works there. (Windows might detect such a change as new hardware and force
a driver reinstall, which could mess things up.)

--

http://www.rodsbooks.com
Author of books on Linux, networking, & multi-OS configuration

 
 
 

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