Routing dialup dedicated Internet Lan connection with Linux/NT?

Routing dialup dedicated Internet Lan connection with Linux/NT?

Post by CT » Fri, 08 Nov 1996 04:00:00



Hi (If you have seen more than one copy of this message please e-mail
me it does not appear on my news server),

We have a small Windows NT/ Windows 95 Network in our office and are
about to get a 24/7 dedicated dial up Internet connection. Our
provider is providing us with 3 IP address for machines on our
network. (This is the number of machines our project requires us to
have fixed IP's for. I'll use Wingate on an NT machine if I need more,
but it's only a 33.6 connection). DNS will be at their end and I'll
set up hosts files on all of the machines on ours. The ISP assures me
that they won't have a problem getting the IP's to route as a subnet
off of their network. Once it gets to mine it's my problem. I've read
that Linux will act as a router. So what I'd like to do is have the
modem connected to the Linux box (PPP) which I want to handle routing
to the other PC's with IP #'s. I need to know how to make it all work.
I've installed Linux before and used it on a network but my tcp/ip
knowledge is not terrific by any means (but I read well and learn real
fast).
        The other problem is how to keep the modems connected full
time we will have USR Couriers at both ends so that should keep modem
related disconnects to a minimum but since the Telco breaks
connections every so many hours unexpected disconnects must be dealt
with somehow, How do I make Linux monitor and relogin each time a
disconnect happens.  
        Is there a good reference on the net or in hard copy for this
type of connection?
        Or should I try it all with NT? Or should I cancel the whole
thing now?

Thanks in advance for any suggestions

Jason Conway

Please CC responses via e-mail
CTC Computer-Tech Consultants Ltd.
http://www.islandnet.com/~ctc10000/

 
 
 

Routing dialup dedicated Internet Lan connection with Linux/NT?

Post by Wesl » Fri, 08 Nov 1996 04:00:00


I have the exact situation as you do.  I have the latest Red Hat Linux
4.0 installed.  In its X-windows, you can add a PPP connection with just
a few point and clicks and it keep your connection 24hours a day.  Hey,
what if the telco drop your line?  I tried unplugging the phone line.  
The line dropped.  I pluged it back it, it redial back up in less than a
minute.  Nice!  

BUT, I still haven't been able to have the Linux box route the traffic
to/from the rest of the machines from my network to the internet.  Just
the gateway machine can be seen by the internet.  All my IPs are
real IPs.  I have two subnet connected to this dialup machine with two
ethernet card and the routing between the two networks is doing OK, too.  
Just the dame PPP connection doesn't route!

By the way, I tried IP masquerade!  My whole network can go thought the
PPP line with no problem at all.  But then, as you know, if you want the
internet see the rest of your network, IP masquerade is not the
solution.  

So far, nobody can give me any hint on what's going wrong at all.  I'm
still working on it, but I'm getting a little frustrated....

Wes

: Hi (If you have seen more than one copy of this message please e-mail
: me it does not appear on my news server),

: We have a small Windows NT/ Windows 95 Network in our office and are
: about to get a 24/7 dedicated dial up Internet connection. Our
: provider is providing us with 3 IP address for machines on our
: network. (This is the number of machines our project requires us to
: have fixed IP's for. I'll use Wingate on an NT machine if I need more,
: but it's only a 33.6 connection). DNS will be at their end and I'll
: set up hosts files on all of the machines on ours. The ISP assures me
: that they won't have a problem getting the IP's to route as a subnet
: off of their network. Once it gets to mine it's my problem. I've read
: that Linux will act as a router. So what I'd like to do is have the
: modem connected to the Linux box (PPP) which I want to handle routing
: to the other PC's with IP #'s. I need to know how to make it all work.
: I've installed Linux before and used it on a network but my tcp/ip
: knowledge is not terrific by any means (but I read well and learn real
: fast).
:       The other problem is how to keep the modems connected full
: time we will have USR Couriers at both ends so that should keep modem
: related disconnects to a minimum but since the Telco breaks
: connections every so many hours unexpected disconnects must be dealt
: with somehow, How do I make Linux monitor and relogin each time a
: disconnect happens.  
:       Is there a good reference on the net or in hard copy for this
: type of connection?
:       Or should I try it all with NT? Or should I cancel the whole
: thing now?

: Thanks in advance for any suggestions

: Jason Conway

: Please CC responses via e-mail
: CTC Computer-Tech Consultants Ltd.
: http://www.islandnet.com/~ctc10000/

 
 
 

1. FS: Dedicated dialup Internet connection

Available immediately: dedicated Internet connection from the Colorado
Internet Cooperative Association.  This is a full-time connection
dialup connection for the Boulder/Denver area via 33.6K modem that
costs $50/month + $100/year for Coop annual membership (paid up
through through December 1998).

This dedicated connection allows you do to many things not possible
with conventional dialup connections.  Most importantly, it allows you
to run a WWW or other server that must remain available at all times.
This could be useful if you need to run E-Commerce applications or
other CGI applications that other ISPs cannot support, or use a Mac or
Windows-based WWW server.  It also allows unlimited email address
creation and unlimited database sizes because you control the server.

While the limited bandwidth of a 33.6K line would seem to be a
problem, it really isn't in many applications because you can store
images and other large data that must be transfered to the browser on
remote servers with higher-bandwidth connections (see
http://www.firesite.com/ for a product that automates this process).

The startup charge for new service of this type is currently $1700
(which is the same price we paid 3 years ago).  See
http://www.coop.net/services/dial.htm for details.  Rather than let
this investment just go to waste, the Coop will allow us to transfer
this connection and our membership to another organization at no
charge.  Startup charges from other ISPs are much lower, but monthly
rates are much higher.  For example:

Rocky Mountain Internet
http://www.rmi.net/home/services/dialup.shtml
Private Port Service
      $100 account setup charge
      $199 per calendar month

OnRamp
http://www.orci.com/neworci/pages/service.dedicated.html
Dedicated Connection
      $75 setup
      $200 monthly

easy.net
http://eazy.net/
Dedicated 33.6K
      $100 startup
      $175 monthly

Dimensional:
http://www.dimensional.com/price.html
Dedicated Dialup (33.6Kbps)
      $150/month + $100 setup ($1650/year)

We are asking $850 for this connection, which represents a payback
time of 4-7 months when compared with using one of these other ISPs.
We've been extremely satisfied with the service and reliability of
this service which was our primary connection at first and is
currently in use as a backup route.  For more information, please

PS: This is a pretty unusual thing to be offering for sale, and I'd
appreciate any forwards to any individuals who may be interested in a
service like this, or suggestions about where else to post this
announcement.

--
*********************************************************

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