IPv6 module of Kernel 2.4.x & Kernel 2.6.x

IPv6 module of Kernel 2.4.x & Kernel 2.6.x

Post by karthikbalagur » Sat, 19 Dec 2009 05:16:50



Hi,
Is it possible to use the IPv6 module of linux kernel 2.6.x
in linux kernel 2.4.x ?

Thx in advans,
Karthik Balaguru

 
 
 

IPv6 module of Kernel 2.4.x & Kernel 2.6.x

Post by Aragor » Sat, 19 Dec 2009 05:24:38


On Thursday 17 December 2009 21:16 in comp.os.linux.networking, somebody

Quote:identifying as karthikbalaguru wrote...
> Hi,
> Is it possible to use the IPv6 module of linux kernel 2.6.x
> in linux kernel 2.4.x ?

Most likely not.  The kernel API for modules has changed between 2.4 and
2.6.  There may however be people who have backported IPv6 support to
2.4 kernels, but this I don't know.

--
*Aragorn*
(registered GNU/Linux user #223157)

 
 
 

IPv6 module of Kernel 2.4.x & Kernel 2.6.x

Post by karthikbalagur » Tue, 22 Dec 2009 08:42:34



Quote:> On Thursday 17 December 2009 21:16 in comp.os.linux.networking, somebody

> identifying as karthikbalaguru wrote...
> > Hi,
> > Is it possible to use the IPv6 module of linux kernel 2.6.x
> > in linux kernel 2.4.x ?

> Most likely not. ?The kernel API for modules has changed between 2.4 and
> 2.6. ?There may however be people who have backported IPv6 support to
> 2.4 kernels, but this I don't know.

What are the changes to be taken into consideration
for backporting from 2.6 to 2.4 ?

Thx in advans,
Karthik Balaguru

 
 
 

IPv6 module of Kernel 2.4.x & Kernel 2.6.x

Post by Aragor » Tue, 22 Dec 2009 09:18:08


On Monday 21 December 2009 00:42 in comp.os.linux.networking, somebody

identifying as karthikbalaguru wrote...

>> On Thursday 17 December 2009 21:16 in comp.os.linux.networking,
>> somebody identifying as karthikbalaguru wrote...

>> > Is it possible to use the IPv6 module of linux kernel 2.6.x
>> > in linux kernel 2.4.x ?

>> Most likely not. ?The kernel API for modules has changed between 2.4
>> and 2.6. ?There may however be people who have backported IPv6
>> support to 2.4 kernels, but this I don't know.

> What are the changes to be taken into consideration
> for backporting from 2.6 to 2.4 ?

Ehm, rewriting your code to match the 2.4 kernel API, perhaps? ;-)

I'm not a developer, let alone a kernel guru, but there should be
documentation out there on the kernel API.

(Note: Many regulars filter out posts coming in from Google Groups due
to the amount of spam distributed from there, along with other
annoyances such as multi-posting.  I would advise you to subscribe to a
real Usenet news service - there are several free ones if your ISP does
not provide for one; look at the one I'm using, for instance - and to
use a real newsreader instead.  Google is best used as a search engine,
and perhaps that is exactly what you should use it for? :p)

--
*Aragorn*
(registered GNU/Linux user #223157)

 
 
 

IPv6 module of Kernel 2.4.x & Kernel 2.6.x

Post by D. Stuss » Tue, 22 Dec 2009 13:25:08



Quote:> Hi,
> Is it possible to use the IPv6 module of linux kernel 2.6.x
> in linux kernel 2.4.x ?

The main IPv6 driver, although it can be, should not be compiled as a
module.  If you're going to use it, it should be permanently resident.
 
 
 

IPv6 module of Kernel 2.4.x & Kernel 2.6.x

Post by Mark Hobl » Tue, 22 Dec 2009 20:08:02



> The main IPv6 driver, although it can be, should not be compiled as a
> module.  If you're going to use it, it should be permanently resident.

Why is that then? Doesn't it work as a module?

Mark.

--
Mark Hobley
Linux User: #370818  http://markhobley.yi.org/

 
 
 

IPv6 module of Kernel 2.4.x & Kernel 2.6.x

Post by D. Stuss » Wed, 23 Dec 2009 07:46:57




> > The main IPv6 driver, although it can be, should not be compiled as a
> > module.  If you're going to use it, it should be permanently resident.

> Why is that then? Doesn't it work as a module?

It's because it's one of those things that if you're using it, you need it
100% of the time.  Therefore, it should be included statically into the
kernel - to avoid the module overhead.
 
 
 

IPv6 module of Kernel 2.4.x & Kernel 2.6.x

Post by Mark Hobl » Wed, 23 Dec 2009 22:08:02



> It's because it's one of those things that if you're using it, you need it
> 100% of the time.  Therefore, it should be included statically into the
> kernel - to avoid the module overhead.

That is interesting. Is there much overhead in a module then?
I thought that the real overhead in this was having module loading
capabilities.

If the kernel has been built with a module loader (ie it is not monolithic),
then isn't it is best to take advantage of this by having the components as
modules?

The advantages of modular implementations (off the top of my head) are:

Small core - suitable for embedded systems
Scalable - same core on embedded systems, desktops and servers
Reduced footprint - only include the modules that you require
Buggy modules can be left out - if a module contains a bug, the core is still
  useable
Alternatives - Alternative module versions can be used
Less rebuilding - You don't need to recompile the core to add or change a module

Are my ideas wrong about this?

Mark.

--
Mark Hobley
Linux User: #370818  http://markhobley.yi.org/

 
 
 

IPv6 module of Kernel 2.4.x & Kernel 2.6.x

Post by D. Stuss » Thu, 24 Dec 2009 09:02:00




> > It's because it's one of those things that if you're using it, you need
it
> > 100% of the time.  Therefore, it should be included statically into the
> > kernel - to avoid the module overhead.

> That is interesting. Is there much overhead in a module then?
> I thought that the real overhead in this was having module loading
> capabilities.

> If the kernel has been built with a module loader (ie it is not
monolithic),
> then isn't it is best to take advantage of this by having the components
as
> modules?

> The advantages of modular implementations (off the top of my head) are:

> Small core - suitable for embedded systems
> Scalable - same core on embedded systems, desktops and servers
> Reduced footprint - only include the modules that you require
> Buggy modules can be left out - if a module contains a bug, the core is
still
>   useable
> Alternatives - Alternative module versions can be used
> Less rebuilding - You don't need to recompile the core to add or change a
module

> Are my ideas wrong about this?

Regarding modules in general, no.

Regarding THIS service (IPv6 core):  Yes.

If one uses it, then under what circumstances would one ever shut it off
(by booting without it or by rmmodding it)?

Would you compile the IPv4 networking core as a module?

 
 
 

IPv6 module of Kernel 2.4.x & Kernel 2.6.x

Post by Mark Hobl » Thu, 24 Dec 2009 11:08:02



> Would you compile the IPv4 networking core as a module?

Yes of course. This allows a change, such as a bug fix or security update
to be applied to the IPv4 module code, and the module to recompiled and
reloaded for the fix to be put into effect without the need to rebuild the
core.

Mark.

--
Mark Hobley
Linux User: #370818  http://markhobley.yi.org/

 
 
 

IPv6 module of Kernel 2.4.x & Kernel 2.6.x

Post by D. Stuss » Thu, 24 Dec 2009 11:43:32




> > Would you compile the IPv4 networking core as a module?

> Yes of course. This allows a change, such as a bug fix or security update
> to be applied to the IPv4 module code, and the module to recompiled and
> reloaded for the fix to be put into effect without the need to rebuild
the
> core.

That's you.  I certainly don't.  I always need it available.

As for changes to a subsystem, there's very little difference between
recompiling and installing it as a module vs. the kernel-resident version.

 
 
 

IPv6 module of Kernel 2.4.x & Kernel 2.6.x

Post by Mark Hobl » Thu, 24 Dec 2009 19:08:02



> If one uses it, then under what circumstances would one ever shut it off
> (by booting without it or by rmmodding it)?

You could have a network that uses IPv4 internally but uses a routing
machine that uses IPv6 externally. This saves the internal lan from having
to carry IPv6 traffic.

Having IPv6 as a module means that only the routing machine has to load it.
The IPv4 clients do not need to carry the unused IPv6 module.

I am assuming here that the same code is deployed across all machines on the
network.

Mark.

--
Mark Hobley
Linux User: #370818  http://markhobley.yi.org/

 
 
 

IPv6 module of Kernel 2.4.x & Kernel 2.6.x

Post by Mark Hobl » Thu, 24 Dec 2009 19:08:02



> That's you.  I certainly don't.  I always need it available.

It is always available. A simple modprobe in the startup scripts and its there

Quote:> As for changes to a subsystem, there's very little difference between
> recompiling and installing it as a module vs. the kernel-resident version.

If you know the core works, there is no need to risk breakage. A module is
good here.

I don't know how much overhead this costs. Do we have any comparison data for
a kernel with loaded modules and a kernel that is identical except that
one of its modules is static?

Mark.

--
Mark Hobley
Linux User: #370818  http://markhobley.yi.org/

 
 
 

1. Prevent kernel 2.6 ipv6 module from being loaded

I am running Red Hat 9 on Fujitsu Lifebook S6120 laptop. For
better ACPI support, I managed to upgrade to kernel
2.6.0-test9-mm1. I am quite satisfied with the improved
performance of the new kernel. But I found that some websites
became unable to respond to my browser's request properly
Either the connection request will be timed out, or the sites
just refuse my request. It looks like some out-of-date DNS
resolvers out there which can not properly handle ipv6 query are
the culprit. The ipv6 support is compiled as loadable module in
my kernel config (CONFIG_IPV6=m). Everytime when I boot, ipv6
module will always be loaded, and it won't be rmmod'ed even after
I shutdown network by 'service network stop', giving an error
"FATAL: Module ipv6 is in use."

It's strange that my old 2.4.20 kernel also has CONFIG_IPV6=m,
but the booting process won't load it since I don't set the
varialbe NETWORKING_IPV6 in the /etc/sysconfig/network config
file. Would anybody please tell me where/how I can prevent the
kernel 2.6 ipv6 module from being loaded automatically when booting?
Or the only solution for me is to disable it (CONFIG_IPV6=n) in the
very first when configuring the kernel?
Many thanks.

--Khoguan Phuann

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