HALP! Network wiring problem

HALP! Network wiring problem

Post by Jim Grunewal » Sat, 26 Aug 2000 04:00:00



I'm having a problem with my wiring in my house. I had an electrician
run a cat5 cable from my office downstairs to the kitchen next door and
upstairs to my daughter's room. The cables are routed through the walls.
Both cables were checked for continuity and passed. They were plugged
into my hub (and obviously the hub was connected to my Linux server).

1. The cable in the kitchen works fine. I tested this by putting my
second computer on the kitchen cable and logging in.
2. When I moved that computer upstairs it would not even ping.
3. Both ends of the cable were replaced - still no ping.
4. A long cable was made up and conected from the hub to the computer
upstairs. The cable was routed up the stairs - still no ping.
5. The cable made in #4 was plugged in the socket in the kitchen. It had
a dramatic effect on the computer - slowing it down even the mouse would
occasionally freeze.
6. The cables routed through the wall were tried in different ports in
the hub - still no ping., however nothing seems to work upstairs.

I thought the cables going upstairs in the wall might have been run near
some other wires that generated interference, but the cable routed
through the house in #4 didn't work either.

Does anybody have any suggestions as to what might be causing my
problem?
Any and all help would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks,
Jim

 
 
 

HALP! Network wiring problem

Post by DEEK » Sat, 26 Aug 2000 04:00:00


Jim Grunewald scribbled:

Quote:> I'm having a problem with my wiring in my house. I had an electrician
> run a cat5 cable from my office downstairs to the kitchen next door and
> upstairs to my daughter's room. The cables are routed through the walls.
> Both cables were checked for continuity and passed. They were plugged
> into my hub (and obviously the hub was connected to my Linux server).

> 1. The cable in the kitchen works fine. I tested this by putting my
> second computer on the kitchen cable and logging in.
> 2. When I moved that computer upstairs it would not even ping.
> 3. Both ends of the cable were replaced - still no ping.
> 4. A long cable was made up and conected from the hub to the computer
> upstairs. The cable was routed up the stairs - still no ping.
> 5. The cable made in #4 was plugged in the socket in the kitchen. It had
> a dramatic effect on the computer - slowing it down even the mouse would
> occasionally freeze.
> 6. The cables routed through the wall were tried in different ports in
> the hub - still no ping., however nothing seems to work upstairs.

> I thought the cables going upstairs in the wall might have been run near
> some other wires that generated interference, but the cable routed
> through the house in #4 didn't work either.

> Does anybody have any suggestions as to what might be causing my
> problem?
> Any and all help would be greatly appreciated.
> Thanks,
> Jim

How long is the cable running up the steps( through the wall up stairs) ?

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HALP! Network wiring problem

Post by Ken Johnso » Sat, 26 Aug 2000 04:00:00



> I'm having a problem with my wiring in my house. I had an electrician

First mistake   ;-)

Quote:> run a cat5 cable from my office downstairs to the kitchen next door and
> upstairs to my daughter's room. The cables are routed through the walls.
> Both cables were checked for continuity and passed. They were plugged
> into my hub (and obviously the hub was connected to my Linux server).

(list of test & failures deleted)

Quote:

> I thought the cables going upstairs in the wall might have been run near
> some other wires that generated interference, but the cable routed
> through the house in #4 didn't work either.

Cat-5 is rarely affected by this.

Quote:> Does anybody have any suggestions as to what might be causing my
> problem?
> Any and all help would be greatly appreciated.

The connectors are likely installed wrong.   You have a short run to the
kitchen, so it doesn't make much difference there, but your upstairs run
is considerably longer, and you must have the right wire pairs on the
right connector pins for the right impedance match.

If you look at the RJ45 connector (pins facing you, plastic lock tab
facing away from you, wire exits at the bottom) the pins are numbered
left-to-right 1 thru 8.   The wire colors should be:

1.  Orange stripe
2.  Orange
3.  Green stripe
4.  Blue
5.  Blue stripe
6.  Green
7.  Brown stripe
8.  Brown

All connectors must follow the same spec.   Try not to straighten out
the twists on the pairs more than you need to get the connector on.  
Connectors and crimp tools are becoming available at most home supply
stores.

If you're using jacks on wall plates (the right way to do it) follow the
EIA-568B wiring plan, which should be imprinted on the jack.   (The A
plan is for telephone wiring.)

K.

 
 
 

HALP! Network wiring problem

Post by Valentin Guille » Sat, 26 Aug 2000 04:00:00


Jim,

First off, your issue could stem from quite different problems and still
appear to be the same issue.

I believe at this point, on the basis of info provided, that your's is
an interference problem rather than a "faulty or defective" circuit.

Both will appear similar in symptom.  

You haven't said whether the actual conductors were individually for
continuity, and for correct polarity, but I'm virtually certain that
those are not the issue.  

I beleive you're suffering from some signal degradation due to ?

Being how this is a problem, you first off will wish to ensure that you
now install some cabling which is shielded.  Category 5 is still what
you want, especially with broadband/optical upon us in many markets, but
you appear to be in a situation in which shielding the conductors (as in
shielded cable) is what you need.  This type cabling is available in
types which have a metallic foil surrounding all of the conductors, or
will have a woven wire braid surrounding.   In many types of sensitive
applications, shielded cable is required, because a signal is much more
difficult to "snoop" with a wireless "tap" on shielded cable.  Well,
you're in a situation where you're more worried about what signals will
be absorbed into the wires, than what is leaking off of it.

Possible culprits:

Electronic phones, solid state light dimmers, touch-metal light switches
of the type where you touch a metal part on lamp to turn on, another
computer, any other FCC category B devices in home, like digital CD
players, computers, VCRs, digital clocks and thermostats, etc.  

Possible things to try before yanking out existing  cabling.

Obtain and install "ferite bead" rf filters on each end of each cable
length.  These are obtainable where network materials are sold, like
where you buy your rj45 modular plugs and crimper.  These will hopefully
attenuate rf interference which the cabling picks up like and antenna,
at either end of the cable.  

Try powering the circuit which controls the router/hub/switch on, as
well as just the upstairs computer on, and EVERYTHING else in the house
off.  Establish a connection.  Then methodically start turning on
breakers in the house till your connection dies.  Then, turn on again,
go to that area of abode, and start turning on/off individual devices,
lights, appliances,etc, until you find the main culprit.  

Remember that any individual length of cat 5(24 gauge) is only good to
320ft max.  

Check out your network card to find out if it has indicators, and how
they work.  Many network cards will have one or more indicators, one of
which will indicate if a connection to valid, operating network device
is made, some others will have traffic activity indicators, etc.  See
which yours has to see if you are connecting but just not able to
transfer any valid data.  A connection indicator would tell you that
your physical connections are good.  You could then concentrate on
abatement of the signal degradation.

Another required diagnostic is to take the "upstairs computer" and
connect it someplace else into the network.  If it works in another
network outlet, then you know with certitude that it's not a
configuration error, as opposed to a connection or data corruption
error.  

Regards,
Valentin

 
 
 

1. [Fwd: Re: HALP! Network wiring problem]


Subject: Re: HALP! Network wiring problem
Newsgroups: comp.os.linux.networking

First mistake   ;-)

(list of test & failures deleted)

Cat-5 is rarely affected by this.

The connectors are likely installed wrong.   You have a short run to the
kitchen, so it doesn't make much difference there, but your upstairs run
is considerably longer, and you must have the right wire pairs on the
right connector pins for the right impedance match.

If you look at the RJ45 connector (pins facing you, plastic lock tab
facing away from you, wire exits at the bottom) the pins are numbered
left-to-right 1 thru 8.   The wire colors should be:

1.  Orange stripe
2.  Orange
3.  Green stripe
4.  Blue
5.  Blue stripe
6.  Green
7.  Brown stripe
8.  Brown

All connectors must follow the same spec.   Try not to straighten out
the twists on the pairs more than you need to get the connector on.  
Connectors and crimp tools are becoming available at most home supply
stores.

If you're using jacks on wall plates (the right way to do it) follow the
EIA-568B wiring plan, which should be imprinted on the jack.   (The A
plan is for telephone wiring.)

K.

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