A Tale of 1 Emachines box, 2 Linux OS'es, 2 NICs, and Network Detection

A Tale of 1 Emachines box, 2 Linux OS'es, 2 NICs, and Network Detection

Post by Robert L. Cochran Jr » Sun, 11 Mar 2001 16:45:50



I am having a really tough problem getting an Emachines computer running
Linux to see my home network. Here is the background:

I took home an Emachines 533id2 box, 64 Mb RAM, running Windows 98
Second Edition and using a Linksys LNE100TX Fast Ethernet card (version
2.0). This is a Celeron processor machine. I connect it to my existing
3-computer network and it runs like a charm. It can see the other
machines and even has a Samba share on the Linux server.  Once I was
sure it could see my network under Windows, I printed a System Summary
in Device Manager for future reference and then entirely replaced
Windows 98 with a fresh install of Red Hat Linux 7. One crucial thing to
note is that I installed every available package. That was probably a
mistake.    

Under Red Hat Linux 7, the machine utterly refused to see my home
network. I couldn't add anything to the routing table. I kept getting
messages such as: SIOCADDRT: Network unreachable and eth0: delaying
initialization of eth0. I opened a support incident with Red Hat which
went on for more than a month. At first the tech suggested that the
Linksys card chip can't be seen by the kernel and I ought to replace the
card. So I replaced it with a new Netgear FA310TX card. (A funny
thing...the Netgear card is listed as rev 20 and the much older netgear
FA310TX card on my other server box has rev 21 listed as part of the
lspci output.)  I still couldn't add anything to the routing table. Then
it was suggested that my drivers needed updating. I followed a suggested
updating procedure using specially created pci-scan and tulip modules.
This resulted in a lot of errors. I was asked to disable my USB in the
system BIOS. Got the same errors. I belatedly remembered that the Red
Hat installation program didn't even detect my network card. I reran the
installation program (without actually reinstalling Red Hat 7) and
confirmed that the installer program didn't see the NIC. Then both I and
the support tech noticed that I was actually running the Red Hat
2.2.16-22Enterprise kernel, not the stock 2.2.16-22 kernel. I changed
over to the 2.2.16-22 kernel, but still couldn't get the network
functionality up and running.

I considered going back to Windows 98 because I knew for sure Windows
can see both the Netgear and Linksys cards.

But then I noticed SuSE 7.1 at CompUSA and the fact that it had the
2.4.0 kernel. Maybe that would help, I told myself. I paid my $73 for it
and installed it on the Emachines box last weekend. By the way, I'm very
impressed with YAST2 and the KDE interfaces (except for the ugly red
screen with "bombs" on it for root's desktop.)

I am getting exactly the same error messages under the 2.4.0 kernel as I
did with 2.2.15-22. However I am paying closer attention to what lspci
is telling me. The Netgear card shows up as having IRQ 255. So does the
Crystal CS4281 PCI Audio controller and the Conexant PCI Modem. It also
looks like the Intel 82801AA USB Universal Host Controller is being
assigned IRQ 11 which conflicts with other devices, and (is ? or perhaps
is not ?) showing as an 'unknown device'. What seems clear is that some
devices including the sound and NIC adapters are being assigned the
wrong IRQs and in a different IRQ assignment order than what Windows 98
SE did.    

Since I have almost no experience with SuSE 7.1, I think my next job is
to install the Netgear driver on the Emachines box. The default SuSE
install does not install the kernel sources, so I'll have to install
those with YAST2 before I can compile the driver. When I checked the
available packages, it looks like there are bunches of them for kernel
sources 2.2.x and I am not sure which package name is *the* package for
2.4.0's kernel sources. Can someone who knows SuSE 7.1 tell me which
kernel source package, by name, I need to install?

The short answer is that my Emachines box can't see the network under
SuSE, either. It did better under Red Hat because I notice that at least
lo was shown in the routing table. Under SuSE, there is no valid routing
table entry. I can ping the IP address I assigned to the Ethernet card.

Has anyone had these problems with Emachines boxes running Linux? Can
anyone point me in the right direction in getting the Emachines 533id2
to see the local network?    

--

Bob Cochran
I am a student of Linux, Java, database and web development.




 
 
 

A Tale of 1 Emachines box, 2 Linux OS'es, 2 NICs, and Network Detection

Post by nag » Tue, 13 Mar 2001 07:52:10


A Newbie answers, the wounds of battle still dripping with * :

Since the machine was intended for windows, the BIOS may have been set
for a "Plug-And-Play-OS", like win98 .
Can you tell the bios that you are not using a plug and play os ?

I am not using ( and never have used) the machines you speak of, but from
the day that I installed Nt4, I've had nothing but trouble from the pnp
facility, which to this day I mistrust.

When you tell the bios that the OS is not pnp , then the BIOS will go
ahead and do a pnp setup. This might take care of those " irq 255" things
you mentioned.

Here's an interesting bit of info: windows 2000 will happily "save"
you resources on the pci bus and jam all devices onto the same irq.

So now I have irq 9 assigned to the GeForce MX and  the SbLive. So guess
what happens when I run a program like 3dmark2000  that makes use of the
sound card as well as the geforce 2 MX processor ... I am accorded the
exclusive previlidge of reaching under the table and yanking out the
power cord, and plugging it in again. Nothing, not even the
four-second-power-button-press  will make it reboot. Funny thing is, when
I boot win98 or linux on the same computer ( I have all 3 on the same
disk ) , the mx is on 9, the sblive goes to 11 , and things are just
fine.

Under linux, I have so far used the Open GL plugin ( xmms ) while playing
music, and nothing's crashed or frozen up.

hth



> I am having a really tough problem getting an Emachines computer running
> Linux to see my home network. Here is the background:

> I took home an Emachines 533id2 box, 64 Mb RAM, running Windows 98
> Second Edition and using a Linksys LNE100TX Fast Ethernet card (version
> 2.0). This is a Celeron processor machine. I connect it to my existing
> 3-computer network and it runs like a charm. It can see the other
> machines and even has a Samba share on the Linux server.  Once I was
> sure it could see my network under Windows, I printed a System Summary
> in Device Manager for future reference and then entirely replaced
> Windows 98 with a fresh install of Red Hat Linux 7. One crucial thing to
> note is that I installed every available package. That was probably a
> mistake.    

> Under Red Hat Linux 7, the machine utterly refused to see my home
> network. I couldn't add anything to the routing table. I kept getting
> messages such as: SIOCADDRT: Network unreachable and eth0: delaying
> initialization of eth0. I opened a support incident with Red Hat which
> went on for more than a month. At first the tech suggested that the
> Linksys card chip can't be seen by the kernel and I ought to replace the
> card. So I replaced it with a new Netgear FA310TX card. (A funny
> thing...the Netgear card is listed as rev 20 and the much older netgear
> FA310TX card on my other server box has rev 21 listed as part of the
> lspci output.)  I still couldn't add anything to the routing table. Then
> it was suggested that my drivers needed updating. I followed a suggested
> updating procedure using specially created pci-scan and tulip modules.
> This resulted in a lot of errors. I was asked to disable my USB in the
> system BIOS. Got the same errors. I belatedly remembered that the Red
> Hat installation program didn't even detect my network card. I reran the
> installation program (without actually reinstalling Red Hat 7) and
> confirmed that the installer program didn't see the NIC. Then both I and
> the support tech noticed that I was actually running the Red Hat
> 2.2.16-22Enterprise kernel, not the stock 2.2.16-22 kernel. I changed
> over to the 2.2.16-22 kernel, but still couldn't get the network
> functionality up and running.

> I considered going back to Windows 98 because I knew for sure Windows
> can see both the Netgear and Linksys cards.

> But then I noticed SuSE 7.1 at CompUSA and the fact that it had the
> 2.4.0 kernel. Maybe that would help, I told myself. I paid my $73 for it
> and installed it on the Emachines box last weekend. By the way, I'm very
> impressed with YAST2 and the KDE interfaces (except for the ugly red
> screen with "bombs" on it for root's desktop.)

> I am getting exactly the same error messages under the 2.4.0 kernel as I
> did with 2.2.15-22. However I am paying closer attention to what lspci
> is telling me. The Netgear card shows up as having IRQ 255. So does the
> Crystal CS4281 PCI Audio controller and the Conexant PCI Modem. It also
> looks like the Intel 82801AA USB Universal Host Controller is being
> assigned IRQ 11 which conflicts with other devices, and (is ? or perhaps
> is not ?) showing as an 'unknown device'. What seems clear is that some
> devices including the sound and NIC adapters are being assigned the
> wrong IRQs and in a different IRQ assignment order than what Windows 98
> SE did.    

> Since I have almost no experience with SuSE 7.1, I think my next job is
> to install the Netgear driver on the Emachines box. The default SuSE
> install does not install the kernel sources, so I'll have to install
> those with YAST2 before I can compile the driver. When I checked the
> available packages, it looks like there are bunches of them for kernel
> sources 2.2.x and I am not sure which package name is *the* package for
> 2.4.0's kernel sources. Can someone who knows SuSE 7.1 tell me which
> kernel source package, by name, I need to install?

> The short answer is that my Emachines box can't see the network under
> SuSE, either. It did better under Red Hat because I notice that at least
> lo was shown in the routing table. Under SuSE, there is no valid routing
> table entry. I can ping the IP address I assigned to the Ethernet card.

> Has anyone had these problems with Emachines boxes running Linux? Can
> anyone point me in the right direction in getting the Emachines 533id2
> to see the local network?    


 
 
 

A Tale of 1 Emachines box, 2 Linux OS'es, 2 NICs, and Network Detection

Post by Robert L. Cochran Jr » Tue, 13 Mar 2001 07:59:15


I'll give this a try. It might be very helpful. Thanks for the
suggestion!

Bob Cochran


> A Newbie answers, the wounds of battle still dripping with * :

> Since the machine was intended for windows, the BIOS may have been set
> for a "Plug-And-Play-OS", like win98 .
> Can you tell the bios that you are not using a plug and play os ?

> I am not using ( and never have used) the machines you speak of, but from
> the day that I installed Nt4, I've had nothing but trouble from the pnp
> facility, which to this day I mistrust.

> When you tell the bios that the OS is not pnp , then the BIOS will go
> ahead and do a pnp setup. This might take care of those " irq 255" things
> you mentioned.

> Here's an interesting bit of info: windows 2000 will happily "save"
> you resources on the pci bus and jam all devices onto the same irq.

> So now I have irq 9 assigned to the GeForce MX and  the SbLive. So guess
> what happens when I run a program like 3dmark2000  that makes use of the
> sound card as well as the geforce 2 MX processor ... I am accorded the
> exclusive previlidge of reaching under the table and yanking out the
> power cord, and plugging it in again. Nothing, not even the
> four-second-power-button-press  will make it reboot. Funny thing is, when
> I boot win98 or linux on the same computer ( I have all 3 on the same
> disk ) , the mx is on 9, the sblive goes to 11 , and things are just
> fine.

> Under linux, I have so far used the Open GL plugin ( xmms ) while playing
> music, and nothing's crashed or frozen up.

> hth



> > I am having a really tough problem getting an Emachines computer running
> > Linux to see my home network. Here is the background:

> > I took home an Emachines 533id2 box, 64 Mb RAM, running Windows 98
> > Second Edition and using a Linksys LNE100TX Fast Ethernet card (version
> > 2.0). This is a Celeron processor machine. I connect it to my existing
> > 3-computer network and it runs like a charm. It can see the other
> > machines and even has a Samba share on the Linux server.  Once I was
> > sure it could see my network under Windows, I printed a System Summary
> > in Device Manager for future reference and then entirely replaced
> > Windows 98 with a fresh install of Red Hat Linux 7. One crucial thing to
> > note is that I installed every available package. That was probably a
> > mistake.

> > Under Red Hat Linux 7, the machine utterly refused to see my home
> > network. I couldn't add anything to the routing table. I kept getting
> > messages such as: SIOCADDRT: Network unreachable and eth0: delaying
> > initialization of eth0. I opened a support incident with Red Hat which
> > went on for more than a month. At first the tech suggested that the
> > Linksys card chip can't be seen by the kernel and I ought to replace the
> > card. So I replaced it with a new Netgear FA310TX card. (A funny
> > thing...the Netgear card is listed as rev 20 and the much older netgear
> > FA310TX card on my other server box has rev 21 listed as part of the
> > lspci output.)  I still couldn't add anything to the routing table. Then
> > it was suggested that my drivers needed updating. I followed a suggested
> > updating procedure using specially created pci-scan and tulip modules.
> > This resulted in a lot of errors. I was asked to disable my USB in the
> > system BIOS. Got the same errors. I belatedly remembered that the Red
> > Hat installation program didn't even detect my network card. I reran the
> > installation program (without actually reinstalling Red Hat 7) and
> > confirmed that the installer program didn't see the NIC. Then both I and
> > the support tech noticed that I was actually running the Red Hat
> > 2.2.16-22Enterprise kernel, not the stock 2.2.16-22 kernel. I changed
> > over to the 2.2.16-22 kernel, but still couldn't get the network
> > functionality up and running.

> > I considered going back to Windows 98 because I knew for sure Windows
> > can see both the Netgear and Linksys cards.

> > But then I noticed SuSE 7.1 at CompUSA and the fact that it had the
> > 2.4.0 kernel. Maybe that would help, I told myself. I paid my $73 for it
> > and installed it on the Emachines box last weekend. By the way, I'm very
> > impressed with YAST2 and the KDE interfaces (except for the ugly red
> > screen with "bombs" on it for root's desktop.)

> > I am getting exactly the same error messages under the 2.4.0 kernel as I
> > did with 2.2.15-22. However I am paying closer attention to what lspci
> > is telling me. The Netgear card shows up as having IRQ 255. So does the
> > Crystal CS4281 PCI Audio controller and the Conexant PCI Modem. It also
> > looks like the Intel 82801AA USB Universal Host Controller is being
> > assigned IRQ 11 which conflicts with other devices, and (is ? or perhaps
> > is not ?) showing as an 'unknown device'. What seems clear is that some
> > devices including the sound and NIC adapters are being assigned the
> > wrong IRQs and in a different IRQ assignment order than what Windows 98
> > SE did.

> > Since I have almost no experience with SuSE 7.1, I think my next job is
> > to install the Netgear driver on the Emachines box. The default SuSE
> > install does not install the kernel sources, so I'll have to install
> > those with YAST2 before I can compile the driver. When I checked the
> > available packages, it looks like there are bunches of them for kernel
> > sources 2.2.x and I am not sure which package name is *the* package for
> > 2.4.0's kernel sources. Can someone who knows SuSE 7.1 tell me which
> > kernel source package, by name, I need to install?

> > The short answer is that my Emachines box can't see the network under
> > SuSE, either. It did better under Red Hat because I notice that at least
> > lo was shown in the routing table. Under SuSE, there is no valid routing
> > table entry. I can ping the IP address I assigned to the Ethernet card.

> > Has anyone had these problems with Emachines boxes running Linux? Can
> > anyone point me in the right direction in getting the Emachines 533id2
> > to see the local network?

--

Bob Cochran
I am a student of Linux, Java, database and web development.

From now until March 14, 2001, I can be reached at the following email
addresses:




From March 14 until I complete DSL service installation, please send
email to:


 
 
 

A Tale of 1 Emachines box, 2 Linux OS'es, 2 NICs, and Network Detection

Post by Robert L. Cochran Jr » Tue, 13 Mar 2001 08:24:57


I just did exactly what you told me to do: I went into my BIOS, turned
off the Plug-and-Play Aware OS setting, and like magic my Netgear card
now works!!! It is on IRQ 5. So the answer to more than one month of
frustration and tearing my hair out is extremely simple: all I had to do
was turn off that particular BIOS setting (on my Emachines 533id2, it
should change to "Other".)

Probably this is also the answer to my problems with Red Hat 7
Professional. I'll let the support tech know. Now that I have SuSE 7.1
able to internet I'm extremely curious about it and rather like the
interface. So I'll keep it on the Emachines and continue with Red Hat 7
on my server.

Thank you very much for all your help, now I'm happily internetting and
I can see my network!

Bob Cochran


> I'll give this a try. It might be very helpful. Thanks for the
> suggestion!

> Bob Cochran


> > A Newbie answers, the wounds of battle still dripping with * :

> > Since the machine was intended for windows, the BIOS may have been set
> > for a "Plug-And-Play-OS", like win98 .
> > Can you tell the bios that you are not using a plug and play os ?

> > I am not using ( and never have used) the machines you speak of, but from
> > the day that I installed Nt4, I've had nothing but trouble from the pnp
> > facility, which to this day I mistrust.

> > When you tell the bios that the OS is not pnp , then the BIOS will go
> > ahead and do a pnp setup. This might take care of those " irq 255" things
> > you mentioned.

> > Here's an interesting bit of info: windows 2000 will happily "save"
> > you resources on the pci bus and jam all devices onto the same irq.

> > So now I have irq 9 assigned to the GeForce MX and  the SbLive. So guess
> > what happens when I run a program like 3dmark2000  that makes use of the
> > sound card as well as the geforce 2 MX processor ... I am accorded the
> > exclusive previlidge of reaching under the table and yanking out the
> > power cord, and plugging it in again. Nothing, not even the
> > four-second-power-button-press  will make it reboot. Funny thing is, when
> > I boot win98 or linux on the same computer ( I have all 3 on the same
> > disk ) , the mx is on 9, the sblive goes to 11 , and things are just
> > fine.

> > Under linux, I have so far used the Open GL plugin ( xmms ) while playing
> > music, and nothing's crashed or frozen up.

> > hth



> > > I am having a really tough problem getting an Emachines computer running
> > > Linux to see my home network. Here is the background:

> > > I took home an Emachines 533id2 box, 64 Mb RAM, running Windows 98
> > > Second Edition and using a Linksys LNE100TX Fast Ethernet card (version
> > > 2.0). This is a Celeron processor machine. I connect it to my existing
> > > 3-computer network and it runs like a charm. It can see the other
> > > machines and even has a Samba share on the Linux server.  Once I was
> > > sure it could see my network under Windows, I printed a System Summary
> > > in Device Manager for future reference and then entirely replaced
> > > Windows 98 with a fresh install of Red Hat Linux 7. One crucial thing to
> > > note is that I installed every available package. That was probably a
> > > mistake.

> > > Under Red Hat Linux 7, the machine utterly refused to see my home
> > > network. I couldn't add anything to the routing table. I kept getting
> > > messages such as: SIOCADDRT: Network unreachable and eth0: delaying
> > > initialization of eth0. I opened a support incident with Red Hat which
> > > went on for more than a month. At first the tech suggested that the
> > > Linksys card chip can't be seen by the kernel and I ought to replace the
> > > card. So I replaced it with a new Netgear FA310TX card. (A funny
> > > thing...the Netgear card is listed as rev 20 and the much older netgear
> > > FA310TX card on my other server box has rev 21 listed as part of the
> > > lspci output.)  I still couldn't add anything to the routing table. Then
> > > it was suggested that my drivers needed updating. I followed a suggested
> > > updating procedure using specially created pci-scan and tulip modules.
> > > This resulted in a lot of errors. I was asked to disable my USB in the
> > > system BIOS. Got the same errors. I belatedly remembered that the Red
> > > Hat installation program didn't even detect my network card. I reran the
> > > installation program (without actually reinstalling Red Hat 7) and
> > > confirmed that the installer program didn't see the NIC. Then both I and
> > > the support tech noticed that I was actually running the Red Hat
> > > 2.2.16-22Enterprise kernel, not the stock 2.2.16-22 kernel. I changed
> > > over to the 2.2.16-22 kernel, but still couldn't get the network
> > > functionality up and running.

> > > I considered going back to Windows 98 because I knew for sure Windows
> > > can see both the Netgear and Linksys cards.

> > > But then I noticed SuSE 7.1 at CompUSA and the fact that it had the
> > > 2.4.0 kernel. Maybe that would help, I told myself. I paid my $73 for it
> > > and installed it on the Emachines box last weekend. By the way, I'm very
> > > impressed with YAST2 and the KDE interfaces (except for the ugly red
> > > screen with "bombs" on it for root's desktop.)

> > > I am getting exactly the same error messages under the 2.4.0 kernel as I
> > > did with 2.2.15-22. However I am paying closer attention to what lspci
> > > is telling me. The Netgear card shows up as having IRQ 255. So does the
> > > Crystal CS4281 PCI Audio controller and the Conexant PCI Modem. It also
> > > looks like the Intel 82801AA USB Universal Host Controller is being
> > > assigned IRQ 11 which conflicts with other devices, and (is ? or perhaps
> > > is not ?) showing as an 'unknown device'. What seems clear is that some
> > > devices including the sound and NIC adapters are being assigned the
> > > wrong IRQs and in a different IRQ assignment order than what Windows 98
> > > SE did.

> > > Since I have almost no experience with SuSE 7.1, I think my next job is
> > > to install the Netgear driver on the Emachines box. The default SuSE
> > > install does not install the kernel sources, so I'll have to install
> > > those with YAST2 before I can compile the driver. When I checked the
> > > available packages, it looks like there are bunches of them for kernel
> > > sources 2.2.x and I am not sure which package name is *the* package for
> > > 2.4.0's kernel sources. Can someone who knows SuSE 7.1 tell me which
> > > kernel source package, by name, I need to install?

> > > The short answer is that my Emachines box can't see the network under
> > > SuSE, either. It did better under Red Hat because I notice that at least
> > > lo was shown in the routing table. Under SuSE, there is no valid routing
> > > table entry. I can ping the IP address I assigned to the Ethernet card.

> > > Has anyone had these problems with Emachines boxes running Linux? Can
> > > anyone point me in the right direction in getting the Emachines 533id2
> > > to see the local network?

> --

> Bob Cochran
> I am a student of Linux, Java, database and web development.

> From now until March 14, 2001, I can be reached at the following email
> addresses:




> From March 14 until I complete DSL service installation, please send
> email to:



--

Bob Cochran
I am a student of Linux, Java, database and web development.

From now until March 14, 2001, I can be reached at the following email
addresses:




From March 14 until I complete DSL service installation, please send
email to: