HELP --- really, really strange network problem!!

HELP --- really, really strange network problem!!

Post by Kevin Tucke » Sun, 09 Aug 1998 04:00:00



Hi, here's the situation:

I've got a desktop PC with an ISA NE2000 compatible NIC (10BaseT), with
PnP disabled, and set for IRQ11, I/O Address 0x300.  It's a triple boot
system with RH 4.2 Linux (2.0.30), NT 4.0 (SP3), and Win98.  The card is
recognized by all 3 systems with no conflicts, and in all 3 OS'es I have
assigned the desktop machine IP 192.168.1.1, subnet 255.255.255.0.  OK,
under all three OS'es, I can ping this IP address with no problems.  I
have connected, with Cat5 crossover cable, my laptop (running Win95)
which I have assigned IP 192.168.1.2, subnet 255.255.255.0.  Now, here's
the problem:

When my desktop machine is booted into Win98, the two machines
communicate flawlessly. TCP/IP, NetBeui, you name it, work just fine.
However, under NT or Linux, neither machine can see one another!  Each
machine can ping it's own IP address (desktop ping 192.168.1.1 ok,
laptop pings 192.168.1.2 ok), but pinging the other machine, forget
about it!  No dice!  NetBeui under NT does not work either!

I am just about at my wit's end!  At this point, my best diagnosis is
that the NE2000 drivers for both NT and Linux have problems with this
particular card, but what a coincidence if that's true!  To me, the fact
that Win98 and Win95 work fine seems to eliminate any hardware problems,
so perhaps I am missing a network setting somewhere? I have checked the
bindings, made sure that the NT workgroup name matches the Win95 (on the
laptop) workgroup name), and under Linux, have run netstat, tcpdump, and
even arp, everything indicating that the desktop's NIC is just not aware
of the network!

Please, any recommendations, advice, or insight is welcome.  If you need
me to elaborate on anything, I'll be happy to oblige.  Also, please post
the replies so that others out there with similar problems may benefit
from the thread.  Thanks in advance,

Kevin

 
 
 

HELP --- really, really strange network problem!!

Post by Allan Holtzman » Sun, 09 Aug 1998 04:00:00



> I am just about at my wit's end!  At this point, my best diagnosis is
> that the NE2000 drivers for both NT and Linux have problems with this
> particular card, but what a coincidence if that's true!

    It's more than likely your card - most chipsets that I've come in
contact with don't truly run NE2000 compatible unless they are configured
for IRQ 3, I/O 300h.  If you aren't using COM 2 or 4 for anything, you might
try that.  Elsewise, check to see that both NT and Linux are being told the
card's exact address and interrupt.

 
 
 

HELP --- really, really strange network problem!!

Post by Kevin Tucke » Sun, 09 Aug 1998 04:00:00


Problem solved!!

Shortly after posting this message, I actually fixed the problem!  It
was a very, very joyous moment indeed!  Anyway, this was the solution:

Since the one thing that Linux and NT have in common is that they are
non-PnP OS's, I figured this may be the problem.  Thus, just for kicks I
went into my systems's BIOS, and low and behold, there were settings for
Plug and Play management, specifically, settings for different IRQ
values.  In my case, IRQ 11, the BIOS setting was set to "Available".
The other setting was "Used by ISA card", or something along those
lines, so I set it to that, rebooted into Linux, and voila!  I was now
able to ping back and forth!  I'm not exactly sure why this worked, but
it does, so evidently for BIOS's such as this (with PnP options similar
to those described above), non-PnP OS's must have the IRQ channel
dedicated to an ISA card!  Strange problem, but I've certainly learned
alot!  Good luck everyone!

Kevin

 
 
 

HELP --- really, really strange network problem!!

Post by Peter Getty » Mon, 10 Aug 1998 04:00:00



> Problem solved!!

> Shortly after posting this message, I actually fixed the problem!  It
> was a very, very joyous moment indeed!  Anyway, this was the solution:

> Since the one thing that Linux and NT have in common is that they are
> non-PnP OS's, I figured this may be the problem.  Thus, just for kicks I
> went into my systems's BIOS, and low and behold, there were settings for
> Plug and Play management, specifically, settings for different IRQ
> values.  In my case, IRQ 11, the BIOS setting was set to "Available".
> The other setting was "Used by ISA card", or something along those
> lines, so I set it to that, rebooted into Linux, and voila!  I was now
> able to ping back and forth!  I'm not exactly sure why this worked, but
> it does, so evidently for BIOS's such as this (with PnP options similar
> to those described above), non-PnP OS's must have the IRQ channel
> dedicated to an ISA card!  Strange problem, but I've certainly learned
> alot!  Good luck everyone!

> Kevin

I've only seen that option on IBM systems(Valuepoint)?
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1. Really, really strange crash...

I am experiencing a strange reproducable crash. I run Linux 5.0 from
the latest SuSE distribution (July97). My system is a Siemens Scenic
Mobile 700 Notebook. When I remove the floppy drive to put in the
battery everything is still fine (yes, following my manual this is
perfectly secure and it never caused any problems with Windoze).
But the moment I unplug the computer from the socket it freezes.
The only thing left is a complete power off...

People suggested that it was due to the floppy driver and I should
recompile the kernel with the floppy driver as a module. I compiled
other kernel settings before but now "make zImage" returns an error.
I did not invest a lot of time into finding out why. Do I have to
"make modules" before "make zImage"?

But anyway: a friend of mine told me that there was indeed a piece of
code executed when unplugging the computer (laptop) from the socket,
at least with the kernel setting APM (advanced power management) enabled.
So it is likely that this code causes the crash. Does anybody know about
this and how to solve this problem? At the moment my laptop is "nailed"
to my desk and that wasn't what the inventor meant it to be...

Any help welcomed,
Phil.

--

  in pricipio erat verbum - the rest is silence
  (John)                               (Hamlet)

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