Stopping Access on Port 110

Stopping Access on Port 110

Post by x_pa.. » Thu, 06 Jan 2000 04:00:00



Could someone tell me how I can prevent a connection to port 110 of my
mail server?

ta.

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Stopping Access on Port 110

Post by Yann PERRI » Thu, 06 Jan 2000 04:00:00



Quote:

> Could someone tell me how I can prevent a connection to port 110 of my
> mail server?

as root fo:

vi /etc/inetd.conf
comment the line dealing about pop with #
/etc/rc.d/init.d/inet restart

 
 
 

Stopping Access on Port 110

Post by E. Eekh » Thu, 06 Jan 2000 04:00:00




>Could someone tell me how I can prevent a connection to port 110 of my
>mail server?

AFAIK you've got two options:

1. Add a # for the line containg pop3 in /etc/inetd.conf and do a 'killall
-HUP inetd'

2. Set up a firewall and block all traffic to port 110. Or even better,
block all trafic from port 110. This way you can detect who connects to port
110 without having anyone being able to use pop3

Succes,
Eric

--

"Whoa...I did a 'zcat /vmlinuz > /dev/audio' and I think I heard God..."
(mikecd on #Linux))

 
 
 

Stopping Access on Port 110

Post by Paul Blac » Thu, 06 Jan 2000 04:00:00



> 2. Set up a firewall and block all traffic to port 110. Or even better,
> block all trafic from port 110. This way you can detect who connects to port
> 110 without having anyone being able to use pop3

There's no difference between the two: the firewall can log attempted
access just as easily.

Paul

 
 
 

Stopping Access on Port 110

Post by E. Eekh » Thu, 06 Jan 2000 04:00:00




>> 2. Set up a firewall and block all traffic to port 110. Or even better,
>> block all trafic from port 110. This way you can detect who connects to port
>> 110 without having anyone being able to use pop3
>There's no difference between the two: the firewall can log attempted
>access just as easily.

You're right about that. The only reason why I mentioned the above solution
is that someone connecting to port 110 will result in one line in
/var/log/messages. When you use the firewall (using ipchains) to log stuff
you get an entry for every packet, which results in a 'polluted'
/var/log/messages. But then again, that's only my experience. I'm sure a nice
solution can be found for this.....

Greetz,
Eric

--

"Whoa...I did a 'zcat /vmlinuz > /dev/audio' and I think I heard God..."
(mikecd on #Linux))

 
 
 

Stopping Access on Port 110

Post by Tony Win » Thu, 06 Jan 2000 04:00:00


Remove -l option from chain and no logging will occur





> >> 2. Set up a firewall and block all traffic to port 110. Or even better,
> >> block all trafic from port 110. This way you can detect who connects to
port
> >> 110 without having anyone being able to use pop3
> >There's no difference between the two: the firewall can log attempted
> >access just as easily.

> You're right about that. The only reason why I mentioned the above
solution
> is that someone connecting to port 110 will result in one line in
> /var/log/messages. When you use the firewall (using ipchains) to log stuff
> you get an entry for every packet, which results in a 'polluted'
> /var/log/messages. But then again, that's only my experience. I'm sure a
nice
> solution can be found for this.....

> Greetz,
> Eric

> --

> "Whoa...I did a 'zcat /vmlinuz > /dev/audio' and I think I heard God..."
> (mikecd on #Linux))

 
 
 

Stopping Access on Port 110

Post by x_pa.. » Fri, 07 Jan 2000 04:00:00




Quote:> > Could someone tell me how I can prevent a connection to port 110 of
my
> > mail server?
> as root fo:

> vi /etc/inetd.conf
> comment the line dealing about pop with #
> /etc/rc.d/init.d/inet restart

Yes, but I have users within our company who use pop on the server.  I
want them to be able to use pop here, but not be able to access port 110
from home.  Is this a contradiction in terms?

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Stopping Access on Port 110

Post by x_pa.. » Fri, 07 Jan 2000 04:00:00




Quote:> Remove -l option from chain and no logging will occur

snip

i managed to contact my predecessor, and he told me that he didnt have
to chaneg the firewall; alll he did was to change 'domain rejecting'

sendmail, right?

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Stopping Access on Port 110

Post by Pete » Fri, 07 Jan 2000 04:00:00


you could just add your LAN to hosts.allow and all other traffic(ALL:ALL)
in hosts.deny.

Wouldn't that be an easier solution?  or do you run other services?

--peter




> > Remove -l option from chain and no logging will occur

> snip

> i managed to contact my predecessor, and he told me that he didnt have
> to chaneg the firewall; alll he did was to change 'domain rejecting'

> sendmail, right?

> Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
> Before you buy.

 
 
 

Stopping Access on Port 110

Post by Mark Po » Sun, 09 Jan 2000 04:00:00


-snip-

Quote:>Yes, but I have users within our company who use pop on the server.  I
>want them to be able to use pop here, but not be able to access port 110
>from home.  Is this a contradiction in terms?

No, it's not, and ipchains will handle this, assuming you can identify all
the possible 'outside' paths to your port 110 when they are at home.
For just the pop part, something like this (but not this simplistic):
ipchains -A -i external_interface -d server_ip:110 -j DENY
ipchains -A -i internal_interface -d server_ip:110 - j ACCEPT

But, once you start firewalling, you need to consider a _lot_ more than just
your pop server port.  Don't expect something as simple-minded as the above
to suffice, because it won't.  However, it can hopefully point you in the
direction of researching what ipchains can do for you.

Mark Post

To send me email, replace 'nospam' with 'home'.

 
 
 

1. Weird SCSI problem on Sun4/110 (Re: Solaris 2.4 traps on Sun 4/110)

Hi again,

I have big problems installing Solaris 2.4 on a Sun4/110. I finally
got only a 1Gb Fujitsu 2694ESA and a Sun CD-ROM drive connected to the
box.

After hours of booting Solaris 2.4 from the CD-ROM and crashing at
different stages, I now come to the conclusion that this must be some
sort of weird SCSI problem. (BTW: The Sun 4/110 SCSI controller is
titled as weird in the SunOS 4.1.2 GENERIC config file as well -
what's so weird about it?)

CD-ROM = SCSI-ID 6
FUJI Disk = SCSI-ID 3

I come differently far in the installation procedure. Amazingly I came
most far when the terminator was removed!! I already tried to change
cables, change the order of the devices but.... no luck.

Anyone any idea what I could try next or what is so weird (as said
in the SunOS 4.1.2 GENERIC config file) about the Sun 4/110 SCSI
controller. After hours of booting I can definately confirm that ;-)

Thanks -- Tom

--

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A-8010 Graz / Austria / Europe, Phone: +43-316-873-7455, Fax: +43-316-463-697
WWW home page: http://wiis.tu-graz.ac.at/people/tom.html

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