Need help convincing my company Linux TCP/IP stack is safe.

Need help convincing my company Linux TCP/IP stack is safe.

Post by Stephen Carvill » Tue, 08 Jun 1999 04:00:00




> Hi,

> the company I work for has been experiencing networking problems
> recently, and they've started to take a look at everything that's
> connected to their internal network. That includes my Linux box. So I'd
> need help convincing them that Linux's TCP/IP stack doesn't cause
> network floods, is well implemented, etc. I know this is a bit silly,
> but...

IF Linux was that screwed up, it wouldn't be so popular with ISP's.  If you
are having broadcast storms the first place to look is your NT boxes.  I
have done dozens of trace captures with a GN sniffer and it is the NT boxes
that generate the broadcast traffic.  The damned browser alone can be a
network butcher but when you add to that a lot of cross-mapping between
workstations and you have a recipe for disaster.  I have seen broadcast
storms averaging 2000 packets per second lasting up to 10 minutes on
networks with only abotu 100 NT stations.  Beleive me when I tell you that
can slow a swithed environment to a crawl.

The dozen or so Linux boxes on our network are almost invisible.

Quote:> So, I'd appreciate pointers to resources showing that Linux's TCP/IP
> stack is implemented according to the RFCs. Pointers to resources
> showing that people actually use Linux on the Internet without causing
> problems (so-and-so % of
> the Internet's web servers are running Linux, company x relies on
> Linux's TCP/IP stack for their business, company y uses Linux for its
> servers, etc.) would also be great. Anything.

NBase-Xyplex use Linux in teh OSR8040 Switch Router.  You can't get more
critical than that.  I haven't had a chance to play with one but the specs
look better than the Cisco 5500's are those suckers are _fast_.

Quote:> If there are other appropriate forums for this kind of questions, I'd
> like hearing about them too.

--
Stephen Carville

----------------------------------------------------
It's all right to have geniuses build systems for use by idiots, but
the path from laboratory to marketplace needs to go through the
proving ground of prudent engineering.
                                        Peter Coffee
 
 
 

Need help convincing my company Linux TCP/IP stack is safe.

Post by Christian Hudo » Wed, 09 Jun 1999 04:00:00


Hi,

the company I work for has been experiencing networking problems
recently, and they've started to take a look at everything that's
connected to their internal network. That includes my Linux box. So I'd
need help convincing them that Linux's TCP/IP stack doesn't cause
network floods, is well implemented, etc. I know this is a bit silly,
but...

So, I'd appreciate pointers to resources showing that Linux's TCP/IP
stack is implemented according to the RFCs. Pointers to resources
showing that people actually use Linux on the Internet without causing
problems (so-and-so % of
the Internet's web servers are running Linux, company x relies on
Linux's TCP/IP stack for their business, company y uses Linux for its
servers, etc.) would also be great. Anything.

If there are other appropriate forums for this kind of questions, I'd
like hearing about them too.

Thanks in advance.

  Christian

 
 
 

Need help convincing my company Linux TCP/IP stack is safe.

Post by Nicholas E Couchma » Wed, 09 Jun 1999 04:00:00


Tell them it's safer than WinNT, because it truly is.  The best place to go
for Linux docs is www.linux.org.  They have info on the latest kernels, as
well as documentation on networking and TCP/IP.  www.linux.org is running
off an actual Linux server (2 of them, but who's counting?), plus there are
countless web servers for people's personal home pages that have switched
from NT to Linux for there primary storage systems.
Don't let them take away Linux!!  If you need to, take your Linux machine
down for a while and (hope) to prove to them that your box isn't causing
the problem.

--Nick


> Hi,

> the company I work for has been experiencing networking problems
> recently, and they've started to take a look at everything that's
> connected to their internal network. That includes my Linux box. So I'd
> need help convincing them that Linux's TCP/IP stack doesn't cause
> network floods, is well implemented, etc. I know this is a bit silly,
> but...

> So, I'd appreciate pointers to resources showing that Linux's TCP/IP
> stack is implemented according to the RFCs. Pointers to resources
> showing that people actually use Linux on the Internet without causing
> problems (so-and-so % of
> the Internet's web servers are running Linux, company x relies on
> Linux's TCP/IP stack for their business, company y uses Linux for its
> servers, etc.) would also be great. Anything.

> If there are other appropriate forums for this kind of questions, I'd
> like hearing about them too.

> Thanks in advance.

>   Christian

 
 
 

Need help convincing my company Linux TCP/IP stack is safe.

Post by David Efflan » Thu, 10 Jun 1999 04:00:00


On Tue, 08 Jun 1999 04:15:19 GMT, Christian Hudon


>Hi,

>the company I work for has been experiencing networking problems
>recently, and they've started to take a look at everything that's
>connected to their internal network. That includes my Linux box. So I'd
>need help convincing them that Linux's TCP/IP stack doesn't cause
>network floods, is well implemented, etc. I know this is a bit silly,
>but...

As far as I know, the Linux box that our factory uses for SMTP, POP3 and
web proxy (squid) has been faultless.  Their NT/Netware has given them
frequent problems, but fortunately we do not use that at our office.  We
are supposed to be using the Netware box for DHCP, but after that failed a
couple of times, I hardcoded the IP's on our subnet so we can connect to
the Linux mail server and our mainframe even when the factory's NT/Netware
system is totally haywire and their PC's can't even get on the network.

--

http://www.xnet.com/~efflandt/

 
 
 

Need help convincing my company Linux TCP/IP stack is safe.

Post by Kevin Ormbre » Thu, 10 Jun 1999 04:00:00


I love linux...but
There was even a recent 2.2 that had a fault in the networking that
caused the network to flood.  Of course there was a fix within a week
where MS would take a couple of months.
If your company's problem is truly a flooding issue then they aren't
that bright.  With any network management software you can tell the MAC
address of the computer causing problems.  They should sniff some
packets before they go around harassing nice linux users


> Hi,

> the company I work for has been experiencing networking problems
> recently, and they've started to take a look at everything that's
> connected to their internal network. That includes my Linux box. So I'd
> need help convincing them that Linux's TCP/IP stack doesn't cause
> network floods, is well implemented, etc. I know this is a bit silly,
> but...

> So, I'd appreciate pointers to resources showing that Linux's TCP/IP
> stack is implemented according to the RFCs. Pointers to resources
> showing that people actually use Linux on the Internet without causing
> problems (so-and-so % of
> the Internet's web servers are running Linux, company x relies on
> Linux's TCP/IP stack for their business, company y uses Linux for its
> servers, etc.) would also be great. Anything.

> If there are other appropriate forums for this kind of questions, I'd
> like hearing about them too.

> Thanks in advance.

>   Christian

--

  Ormbrek  (o o)    http://www.kettering.edu/~ormb7576/
--------oo0-(_)-0oo----------------------------------------------------
 
 
 

Need help convincing my company Linux TCP/IP stack is safe.

Post by Lee Shar » Thu, 10 Jun 1999 04:00:00


On Tue, 08 Jun 1999 04:15:19 GMT, Christian Hudon


>Hi,

>the company I work for has been experiencing networking problems
>recently, and they've started to take a look at everything that's
>connected to their internal network. That includes my Linux box. So I'd
>need help convincing them that Linux's TCP/IP stack doesn't cause
>network floods, is well implemented, etc. I know this is a bit silly,
>but...

   A common thing in the industry is blame the thing you know the least
about. :-)  However, you can help them.  First, is to defend the stack.
Many people can help by stating that Linux has a robust stack that is as
good or better than NT.  <Myself included, I do this for a living>
   Second is to solve there flooding issue.  If they are having this
problem, they need a sniffer.  Sniffers are expensive.  But there is a GPL
clone of one for Linux! :-)  http://ethereal.zing.org/  It is betaish, but
stable enough for most troubleshooting on IP networks.

                        Lee
--
SCSI is *NOT* magic. There are *fundamental technical reasons* why it is
necessary to sacrifice a young goat to your SCSI chain now and then. *
Black holes are where God divided by zero. - I am speaking as an
individual, not as a representative of any company, organization or other
entity.  I am solely responsible for my words.

 
 
 

Need help convincing my company Linux TCP/IP stack is safe.

Post by Duncan Simps » Thu, 10 Jun 1999 04:00:00




>> Hi,

>> the company I work for has been experiencing networking problems
>> recently, and they've started to take a look at everything that's
>> connected to their internal network. That includes my Linux box. So I'd
>> need help convincing them that Linux's TCP/IP stack doesn't cause
>> network floods, is well implemented, etc. I know this is a bit silly,
>> but...
>IF Linux was that screwed up, it wouldn't be so popular with ISP's.  If you
>are having broadcast storms the first place to look is your NT boxes.  I
>have done dozens of trace captures with a GN sniffer and it is the NT boxes
>that generate the broadcast traffic.  The damned browser alone can be a
>network butcher but when you add to that a lot of cross-mapping between
>workstations and you have a recipe for disaster.  I have seen broadcast
>storms averaging 2000 packets per second lasting up to 10 minutes on
>networks with only abotu 100 NT stations.  Beleive me when I tell you that
>can slow a swithed environment to a crawl.

I would add that running tcpdump will reveal which machines are
flooding the network with what packets. This probably points to gratitous
SMB broadcasts by NT. In the unlike case it your linux your you will
know to0 (and *should* be able to fix it).

--
Duncan (-:
"software industry, the: unique industry where selling substandard goods is
legal and you can charge extra for fixing the problems."

 
 
 

Need help convincing my company Linux TCP/IP stack is safe.

Post by Jim Richards » Fri, 11 Jun 1999 04:00:00


On Tue, 08 Jun 1999 04:15:19 GMT,

 brought forth the following words...:

Quote:>Hi,

>the company I work for has been experiencing networking problems
>recently, and they've started to take a look at everything that's
>connected to their internal network. That includes my Linux box. So I'd
>need help convincing them that Linux's TCP/IP stack doesn't cause
>network floods, is well implemented, etc. I know this is a bit silly,
>but...

>So, I'd appreciate pointers to resources showing that Linux's TCP/IP
>stack is implemented according to the RFCs. Pointers to resources
>showing that people actually use Linux on the Internet without causing
>problems (so-and-so % of
>the Internet's web servers are running Linux, company x relies on
>Linux's TCP/IP stack for their business, company y uses Linux for its
>servers, etc.) would also be great. Anything.

>If there are other appropriate forums for this kind of questions, I'd
>like hearing about them too.

>Thanks in advance.

>  Christian

If you grab a copy of iptraf and sniffit, you can track the packets and see
where they are comming from. (hostwise.) Prob NT...

--
Jim Richardson
        Anarchist, pagan and proud of it
WWW.eskimo.com/~warlock
        Linux, because life's too short for a buggy OS.

 
 
 

Need help convincing my company Linux TCP/IP stack is safe.

Post by Jonathan Johns » Mon, 14 Jun 1999 04:00:00



> I love linux...but
> There was even a recent 2.2 that had a fault in the networking that
> caused the network to flood.  Of course there was a fix within a week
> where MS would take a couple of months.

Can you expound on this?  I've had some problems... found a temporarily
permanent solution of killing icmplog daemon... (I don't know why, but it
worked, I think...)

--Jon

 
 
 

Need help convincing my company Linux TCP/IP stack is safe.

Post by Gilford Wimbl » Tue, 15 Jun 1999 04:00:00


On Tue, 08 Jun 1999 04:15:19 GMT, Christian Hudon


>Hi,

>the company I work for has been experiencing networking problems
>recently, and they've started to take a look at everything that's
>connected to their internal network. That includes my Linux box. So I'd
>need help convincing them that Linux's TCP/IP stack doesn't cause
>network floods, is well implemented, etc. I know this is a bit silly,
>but...

>So, I'd appreciate pointers to resources showing that Linux's TCP/IP
>stack is implemented according to the RFCs. Pointers to resources
>showing that people actually use Linux on the Internet without causing
>problems (so-and-so % of
>the Internet's web servers are running Linux, company x relies on
>Linux's TCP/IP stack for their business, company y uses Linux for its
>servers, etc.) would also be great. Anything.

>If there are other appropriate forums for this kind of questions, I'd
>like hearing about them too.

There's one called "comp.os.linux.advocacy"
I bet those folks can dig up some stats for you.

Quote:>Thanks in advance.

>  Christian

Good luck!
GW
 
 
 

Need help convincing my company Linux TCP/IP stack is safe.

Post by Matthew Marlow » Tue, 15 Jun 1999 04:00:00


Gilford,

I doubt that it's the stack - they might be pretty unclued if they
think that it is.  It could be a bad ethernet card on the network,
bad wiring, etc....rather than wasting their time guessing, they
should do some network troubleshooting or bring in a network tester.

Thanks,
Matt


> On Tue, 08 Jun 1999 04:15:19 GMT, Christian Hudon

> >Hi,

> >the company I work for has been experiencing networking problems
> >recently, and they've started to take a look at everything that's
> >connected to their internal network. That includes my Linux box. So I'd
> >need help convincing them that Linux's TCP/IP stack doesn't cause
> >network floods, is well implemented, etc. I know this is a bit silly,
> >but...

> >So, I'd appreciate pointers to resources showing that Linux's TCP/IP
> >stack is implemented according to the RFCs. Pointers to resources
> >showing that people actually use Linux on the Internet without causing
> >problems (so-and-so % of
> >the Internet's web servers are running Linux, company x relies on
> >Linux's TCP/IP stack for their business, company y uses Linux for its
> >servers, etc.) would also be great. Anything.

> >If there are other appropriate forums for this kind of questions, I'd
> >like hearing about them too.

> There's one called "comp.os.linux.advocacy"
> I bet those folks can dig up some stats for you.

> >Thanks in advance.

> >  Christian

> Good luck!
> GW

--
Matthew Marlowe       http://www.jalan.com/   (p) 909.799.3805

"Quality Web Hosting, Network, Linux, and Solaris Consulting"
 
 
 

Need help convincing my company Linux TCP/IP stack is safe.

Post by Larry Iron » Fri, 18 Jun 1999 04:00:00



> Gilford,

> I doubt that it's the stack - they might be pretty unclued if they
> think that it is.  It could be a bad ethernet card on the network,
> bad wiring, etc....rather than wasting their time guessing, they
> should do some network troubleshooting or bring in a network tester.

> Thanks,
> Matt


> > On Tue, 08 Jun 1999 04:15:19 GMT, Christian Hudon

> > >Hi,

> > >the company I work for has been experiencing networking problems
> > >recently, and they've started to take a look at everything that's
> > >connected to their internal network. That includes my Linux box. So I'd
> > >need help convincing them that Linux's TCP/IP stack doesn't cause
> > >network floods, is well implemented, etc. I know this is a bit silly,
> > >but...

> > >So, I'd appreciate pointers to resources showing that Linux's TCP/IP
> > >stack is implemented according to the RFCs. Pointers to resources
> > >showing that people actually use Linux on the Internet without causing
> > >problems (so-and-so % of
> > >the Internet's web servers are running Linux, company x relies on
> > >Linux's TCP/IP stack for their business, company y uses Linux for its
> > >servers, etc.) would also be great. Anything.

> > >If there are other appropriate forums for this kind of questions, I'd
> > >like hearing about them too.

> > There's one called "comp.os.linux.advocacy"
> > I bet those folks can dig up some stats for you.

> > >Thanks in advance.

> > >  Christian

> > Good luck!
> > GW

> --
> Matthew Marlowe       http://www.jalan.com/   (p) 909.799.3805

> "Quality Web Hosting, Network, Linux, and Solaris Consulting"

I just had a major problem with a bad network card on a Linux server. It
was a Realtek based NIC. It was causing all kinds of problems on a mixed
Unix and Windows network. The Linux box even locked up! I have never
seen that before, because Linux is very stable; more stable than
anything else I have seen. Anyway, I replaced the network card with a
3-Com card and everything is smooth as silk now. I don't know if the
driver is bad for the card or if the card went south (most likely). My
client was losing faith in my suggestion of using Linux, but now they
love the situation.

Larry

--
Larry Irons
A Direct Descendant of William the Conqueror, Charlemagne, Clovis,
Edward III, Edward I Longshanks, and King John

http://www.irons-assoc.com/

 
 
 

Need help convincing my company Linux TCP/IP stack is safe.

Post by Ron Bombar » Fri, 18 Jun 1999 04:00:00




> > Gilford,

> > I doubt that it's the stack - they might be pretty unclued if they
> > think that it is.  It could be a bad ethernet card on the network,
> > bad wiring, etc....rather than wasting their time guessing, they
> > should do some network troubleshooting or bring in a network tester.

> > Thanks,
> > Matt


> > > On Tue, 08 Jun 1999 04:15:19 GMT, Christian Hudon

> > > >Hi,

> > > >the company I work for has been experiencing networking problems
> > > >recently, and they've started to take a look at everything that's
> > > >connected to their internal network. That includes my Linux box. So I'd
> > > >need help convincing them that Linux's TCP/IP stack doesn't cause
> > > >network floods, is well implemented, etc. I know this is a bit silly,
> > > >but...

> > > >So, I'd appreciate pointers to resources showing that Linux's TCP/IP
> > > >stack is implemented according to the RFCs. Pointers to resources
> > > >showing that people actually use Linux on the Internet without causing
> > > >problems (so-and-so % of
> > > >the Internet's web servers are running Linux, company x relies on
> > > >Linux's TCP/IP stack for their business, company y uses Linux for its
> > > >servers, etc.) would also be great. Anything.

> > > >If there are other appropriate forums for this kind of questions, I'd
> > > >like hearing about them too.

> > > There's one called "comp.os.linux.advocacy"
> > > I bet those folks can dig up some stats for you.

> > > >Thanks in advance.

> > > >  Christian

> > > Good luck!
> > > GW

> > --
> > Matthew Marlowe       http://www.jalan.com/   (p) 909.799.3805

> > "Quality Web Hosting, Network, Linux, and Solaris Consulting"

> I just had a major problem with a bad network card on a Linux server. It
> was a Realtek based NIC. It was causing all kinds of problems on a mixed
> Unix and Windows network. The Linux box even locked up! I have never
> seen that before, because Linux is very stable; more stable than
> anything else I have seen. Anyway, I replaced the network card with a
> 3-Com card and everything is smooth as silk now. I don't know if the
> driver is bad for the card or if the card went south (most likely). My
> client was losing faith in my suggestion of using Linux, but now they
> love the situation.

> Larry

> --
> Larry Irons
> A Direct Descendant of William the Conqueror, Charlemagne, Clovis,
> Edward III, Edward I Longshanks, and King John

> http://www.irons-assoc.com/

Hi,
My two cents:

I just had the same problem as Larry.... NIC went south.  caused the
linux box to hang and disconnected about 30 pc's from the network.
(screw 'em if they can't take a joke....)

Replaced the card and all is well.  I have 2 linux servers. Both running
redhat.  One is our company's mail server (over 100 users). The other is
a file server for about 40 users running samba.  Not bad when you can
build a fileserver and it only costs you a couple of grand, including
the OS!   Damn, linux makes me look good!

Ron

--
Ron Bombard,  Network Administrator

PO Box 2567, Glens Falls, Ny 12801
http://members.theglobe.com/virtual_ron

Sometimes loosing a wife can be hard... in my
case it was nearly impossible!!!
---------------------------------------------------
   _O_        _____         _<>_          ___  
 /     \     |     |      /      \      /  _  \
|==/=\==|    |[/_\]|     |==\==/==|    |  / \  |
|  O O  |    / O O \     |   ><   |    |  |"|  |
 \  V  /    /\  -  /\  ,-\   ()   /-.   \  X  /
 /`---'\     /`---'\   V( `-====-' )V   /`---'\
 O'_:_`O     O'M|M`O   (_____:|_____)   O'_|_`O
  -- --       -- --      ----  ----      -- --  
  STAN         KYLE        CARTMAN       KENNY

 
 
 

1. Telnet sessions hangs TCP/IP Stack !!!! HELP Needed.

Hello !

We where using a Unix SCO Based System and Serial connections to Ascii
terminal on customer side.

We have installed TCP/IP on the Unix Box, connected it to a Hub thought
a NetFlex Ethernet Adapter and configure TCP/IP as we supposed it has to
be..

The ping from / to a other device is OK, FTP from / to seems to be OK,
the only (but most important) problem we have is that when we telnet the
Unix Box, we have the signon Unix screen, we can use the program
installed on it for few minutes and ... we are frozen.., the TCP/IP
Stack hangs on the Unix side and no more ping possible From / to the
Unix box, no FTP possible, the system need to be restarted to re-enable
TCP/IP.

I suspected a TCP/IP configuration problem.. can someone give me some
advice to configure the TCP/IP Stacks on the basis you will find below,
or any other idea to solve our problem ????, what have to be put in the
Host file, / what have to be the result of netstat -r ?.. a lot of
questions indeed, a lot of answers i hope !!

Unix Box TCP/IP Adress   : 195.79.194.67
Unix box Name            : UK64_01
Subnet mask              : 255.255.255.192 (Subnetting for 62 Hosts)
Gateway (Router) IP Adrs : 195.79.194.65

Thanks

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