Obtaining Class C IP address block.

Obtaining Class C IP address block.

Post by j.. » Wed, 25 Aug 1999 04:00:00



Hi,

 Can  someone assist me in obtaining  IP address block for internet
use. I am planning on setting up several web servers which will have
their own name server. The web servers would all have static IP
addresses with a domain name bound to each.

I need  a block of 50 to start with.
My co-location ISP told me he could rent a block to me. But what would
happen if I decide to move to another location some time in the
future.  Do I loose the IP addresses and have to register new ones or
rent new ones from another ISP?
Can I get a block of IP addresses that are unique - which I can keep
to myself. Something like a domain name that I register.
Where do I get this from.

 Your help will be highly regarded.

 Thanks & regards,

 
 
 

Obtaining Class C IP address block.

Post by Ke » Wed, 25 Aug 1999 04:00:00


You are probably better off renting from you ISP, and then updating
your InterNIC records if/when you change providers unless you have a
stack of ducats available and can demonstrate a justifiable need and
convince ARIN to allocate you a Class C block.  You're talking a min
of $2,500/year though, if I understand correcctly.

hth-- ken


>Hi,

> Can  someone assist me in obtaining  IP address block for internet
>use. I am planning on setting up several web servers which will have
>their own name server. The web servers would all have static IP
>addresses with a domain name bound to each.

>I need  a block of 50 to start with.
>My co-location ISP told me he could rent a block to me. But what would
>happen if I decide to move to another location some time in the
>future.  Do I loose the IP addresses and have to register new ones or
>rent new ones from another ISP?
>Can I get a block of IP addresses that are unique - which I can keep
>to myself. Something like a domain name that I register.
>Where do I get this from.

> Your help will be highly regarded.

> Thanks & regards,


 
 
 

Obtaining Class C IP address block.

Post by Andrey Smirno » Wed, 25 Aug 1999 04:00:00


Your ISP should provide you with IP block (you can't get 50, but you can get
60 usable!).

Normally ISPs rent ip addresses to customers, unless you are T1 or higher
bandwidth customer, than you can get IP block as a part of your contract.

Also you need to be prepared to explain why you need that many IP addresses
to you ISP.

And when you change your ISP, you lose addresses!

Good luck!


Quote:> Hi,

>  Can  someone assist me in obtaining  IP address block for internet
> use. I am planning on setting up several web servers which will have
> their own name server. The web servers would all have static IP
> addresses with a domain name bound to each.

> I need  a block of 50 to start with.
> My co-location ISP told me he could rent a block to me. But what would
> happen if I decide to move to another location some time in the
> future.  Do I loose the IP addresses and have to register new ones or
> rent new ones from another ISP?
> Can I get a block of IP addresses that are unique - which I can keep
> to myself. Something like a domain name that I register.
> Where do I get this from.

>  Your help will be highly regarded.

>  Thanks & regards,

 
 
 

Obtaining Class C IP address block.

Post by Miguel Cr » Wed, 25 Aug 1999 04:00:00



> I need  a block of 50 to start with.
> My co-location ISP told me he could rent a block to me. But what would
> happen if I decide to move to another location some time in the
> future.  Do I loose the IP addresses and have to register new ones or
> rent new ones from another ISP?

That's what DNS is for. If you need to change IP numbers later, just adjust
your name server data and nobody will be the wiser.

miguel

 
 
 

Obtaining Class C IP address block.

Post by Andrew Ern » Thu, 26 Aug 1999 04:00:00


Good luck trying to get a C class block from anyone but your ISP, and
chances are if you only need 50, then you're not going to get a full
C.  If you're lucky you might get a /28 from them (well if they
consider your actual needs prior to talking money) :)

        -- Andrew

Andrew Ernst
Network Operations
W3 Internet Services Ltd.
http://www.w3internet.com


>You are probably better off renting from you ISP, and then updating
>your InterNIC records if/when you change providers unless you have a
>stack of ducats available and can demonstrate a justifiable need and
>convince ARIN to allocate you a Class C block.  You're talking a min
>of $2,500/year though, if I understand correcctly.

>hth-- ken