Linux instead of NT server?

Linux instead of NT server?

Post by John Murph » Tue, 03 Jul 2001 03:17:40



Is it possible to use Linux in place of NT server? The clients are running
Win9X, about 20+ of them and they need file and print sharing as well as a
secure(ish) place for users' files.

If it is possible, what is needed to get the Win9x machines to logon to a
Linux box rather then NT server?

If these questions are ignorant of Linux, naive and trivial, well so am I!
:-)

--
John Murphy

 
 
 

Linux instead of NT server?

Post by Daniel Kenzelman » Tue, 03 Jul 2001 04:24:11




> Is it possible to use Linux in place of NT server? The clients are
> running Win9X, about 20+ of them and they need file and print sharing as
> well as a secure(ish) place for users' files.

yes!

Quote:> If it is possible, what is needed to get the Win9x machines to logon to
> a Linux box rather then NT server?

samba, for win95 boxes, samba 2.0.10 will be ok, for win2000 boxes use
samba 2.2.0a

Quote:> If these questions are ignorant of Linux, naive and trivial, well so am
> I! :-)

No, they only represent the average knowledge of a windows user
about linux.
:-)
Be aware.. for samba to work properly, you will have to edit the
config file (which can be a lot of work if you have many different
access rights for different users... check out the howtos
http://www.samba.org

TripleD
--
The day Microsoft makes something that does not suck,
is probably the day they start making vacuum cleaners.

GnuPG/OpenPGP key available on request

 
 
 

Linux instead of NT server?

Post by John Murph » Tue, 03 Jul 2001 06:12:21


Daniel Kenzelmann wrote in comp.os.linux.networking:


> Murphy"

>> Is it possible to use Linux in place of NT server? The clients are
>> running Win9X, about 20+ of them and they need file and print sharing
>> as well as a secure(ish) place for users' files.

> yes!

Okay. Thanks, better get a copy of this Linux thing then. And another
computer. :-)

Quote:>> If it is possible, what is needed to get the Win9x machines to logon
>> to a Linux box rather then NT server?

> samba, for win95 boxes, samba 2.0.10 will be ok, for win2000 boxes use
> samba 2.2.0a

Have I got this right? Samba will pretent to be an NT PDC server so I don't
need additional software for the Win9x machines. There was a ref. to
setting up Win95 on the samba download page but I got "Page not available".

Quote:>> If these questions are ignorant of Linux, naive and trivial, well so
>> am I! :-)

> No, they only represent the average knowledge of a windows user
> about linux.
>:-)

Just don't see much of it. Last week saw my second example ever. Someone
came in and set it up for us as a proxy server.

Quote:> Be aware.. for samba to work properly, you will have to edit the
> config file (which can be a lot of work if you have many different
> access rights for different users... check out the howtos
> http://www.samba.org

Didn't find that one but there were a whole bunch of others. No matter, got
to get a copy of Linux and get it installed. Learn new commands. Enough
problems there. :-)

Thanks for the reply.

--
John Murphy

 
 
 

Linux instead of NT server?

Post by David » Tue, 03 Jul 2001 10:15:11


You need to look into using Samba (www.samba.org) for file and print sharing
for Windows.

To get basic file and print sharing working is very easy and will knock the
socks of Windows for
reliability.

To get a PDC up and running is a bit more difficult especially with Windows
2000. It can be done
and security is employed through UNIX security and access control lists
within Samba.

You can have users shares and group shares and public shares etc.

Have a look at also Samba TNG (The Next Generation) at www.samba-tng.org
which is more
like Windows 2000 in nature.

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Quote:> Is it possible to use Linux in place of NT server? The clients are running
> Win9X, about 20+ of them and they need file and print sharing as well as a
> secure(ish) place for users' files.

> If it is possible, what is needed to get the Win9x machines to logon to a
> Linux box rather then NT server?

> If these questions are ignorant of Linux, naive and trivial, well so am I!
> :-)

> --
> John Murphy

 
 
 

Linux instead of NT server?

Post by Bill Pit » Tue, 03 Jul 2001 13:17:51



> Is it possible to use Linux in place of NT server? The clients are running
> Win9X, about 20+ of them and they need file and print sharing as well as a
> secure(ish) place for users' files.
> If it is possible, what is needed to get the Win9x machines to logon to a
> Linux box rather then NT server?
> If these questions are ignorant of Linux, naive and trivial, well so am I!
> :-)

Sure.  The only time when you will have a more difficult time in replacing
an NT server is when it's running Exchange and all of the clients are
configured for it.

In your case, I'm assuming you're talking about a corporate network, which
would hopefully allow for a Saturday or Sunday downtime.  (If not, brew up
a lot of coffee! :) )

If you're careful about it, you could actually make the change nearly
transparent.  You'll need to setup a Linux box with samba (see www.samba.org)
installed.  This is the order I would do things in:

1. Buy separate hardware for the new Linux server (this is also a good time
for disk upgrades, etc.) to minimize downtime.

2. Install the flavor of your choice and apply all of the latest security
patches and updates.  If the server is going to be connected to the Internet,
make sure that you close off *ALL* unneeded ports to the outside using some
sort of firewalling.

3. Set up Samba to handle domain logins and test it with a single client
machine.

4. If that works, then it's time to take the NT server off of the main
network segment and mirror over all user data (including usernames and
passwords) and do the final configuration on the Linux/Samba setup.

5. Assuming you got everything setup correctly, the Win9x machines should
now be able to log in using the Samba server as the PDC instead of the NT
machine.  (If you want to be really clever, you can set up the Linux box
to have all of the same network settings as the NT machine, and then the
Windows clients won't need any reconfiguration.)

-Bill

 
 
 

Linux instead of NT server?

Post by Dean Thompso » Tue, 03 Jul 2001 15:01:10


Hi!,

Quote:> Is it possible to use Linux in place of NT server? The clients are running
> Win9X, about 20+ of them and they need file and print sharing as well as a
> secure(ish) place for users' files.

> If it is possible, what is needed to get the Win9x machines to logon to a
> Linux box rather then NT server?

> If these questions are ignorant of Linux, naive and trivial, well so am I!
> :-)

Yes, Linux can do all of this.  You will need to install a program called
"SAMBA" onto your Liux box and make it act as a primary domain controller.
You might like to take a look at the information which can be found at
http://www.samba.org.  In the documentation section there are a couple of
documents which outline how SAMBA can be used as a PDC.

See ya

Dean Thompson

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Linux instead of NT server?

Post by John Murph » Tue, 03 Jul 2001 15:13:23


David T wrote in comp.os.linux.networking:

Quote:> You need to look into using Samba (www.samba.org) for file and print
> sharing for Windows.

> To get basic file and print sharing working is very easy and will knock
> the socks of Windows for
> reliability.
> To get a PDC up and running is a bit more difficult especially with
> Windows 2000. It can be done
> and security is employed through UNIX security and access control lists
> within Samba.

Using it with Win2K would be useful but can wait.

Quote:> You can have users shares and group shares and public shares etc.

> Have a look at also Samba TNG (The Next Generation) at
> www.samba-tng.org which is more
> like Windows 2000 in nature.

Thanks, will do.

--
John Murphy

 
 
 

Linux instead of NT server?

Post by John Murph » Tue, 03 Jul 2001 15:21:11


Bill Pitz wrote in comp.os.linux.networking:


>> Is it possible to use Linux in place of NT server? The clients are
>> running Win9X, about 20+ of them and they need file and print sharing
>> as well as a secure(ish) place for users' files.

>> If it is possible, what is needed to get the Win9x machines to logon
>> to a Linux box rather then NT server?

>> If these questions are ignorant of Linux, naive and trivial, well so
>> am I!
>> :-)

> Sure.  The only time when you will have a more difficult time in
> replacing an NT server is when it's running Exchange and all of the
> clients are configured for it.

We no longer run exchange. Too much hard work for me.

Quote:> In your case, I'm assuming you're talking about a corporate network,
> which would hopefully allow for a Saturday or Sunday downtime.  (If
> not, brew up a lot of coffee! :) )

It's my classroom.

Quote:> If you're careful about it, you could actually make the change nearly
> transparent.  You'll need to setup a Linux box with samba (see
> www.samba.org) installed.  This is the order I would do things in:

> 1. Buy separate hardware for the new Linux server (this is also a good
> time for disk upgrades, etc.) to minimize downtime.

> 2. Install the flavor of your choice and apply all of the latest
> security patches and updates.  If the server is going to be connected
> to the Internet, make sure that you close off *ALL* unneeded ports to
> the outside using some sort of firewalling.

This one isn't. But if this swap is successful ......

Quote:> 3. Set up Samba to handle domain logins and test it with a single
> client machine.

> 4. If that works, then it's time to take the NT server off of the main
> network segment and mirror over all user data (including usernames and
> passwords) and do the final configuration on the Linux/Samba setup.

Sounds easy. :-)

Quote:> 5. Assuming you got everything setup correctly, the Win9x machines
> should now be able to log in using the Samba server as the PDC instead
> of the NT machine.  (If you want to be really clever, you can set up
> the Linux box to have all of the same network settings as the NT
> machine, and then the Windows clients won't need any reconfiguration.)

Yep, that's the cunning plan. :-)

--
John Murphy

 
 
 

Linux instead of NT server?

Post by John Murph » Tue, 03 Jul 2001 15:22:26


Dean Thompson wrote in comp.os.linux.networking:

Quote:

> Hi!,

>> Is it possible to use Linux in place of NT server?

> Yes, Linux can do all of this.  You will need to install a program
> called "SAMBA" onto your Liux box and make it act as a primary domain
> controller. You might like to take a look at the information which can
> be found at http://www.samba.org.  In the documentation section there
> are a couple of documents which outline how SAMBA can be used as a PDC.

Thanks. You realise I'm bound to be back now, "How do I ....".

--
John Murphy

 
 
 

Linux instead of NT server?

Post by Bill Pit » Tue, 03 Jul 2001 15:59:25



> Bill Pitz wrote in comp.os.linux.networking:

>>> Is it possible to use Linux in place of NT server? The clients are
>>> running Win9X, about 20+ of them and they need file and print sharing
>>> as well as a secure(ish) place for users' files.

>>> If it is possible, what is needed to get the Win9x machines to logon
>>> to a Linux box rather then NT server?

>>> If these questions are ignorant of Linux, naive and trivial, well so
>>> am I!
>>> :-)

>> Sure.  The only time when you will have a more difficult time in
>> replacing an NT server is when it's running Exchange and all of the
>> clients are configured for it.
> We no longer run exchange. Too much hard work for me.

I seem to remember telling myself the same story a few times... :-)

Quote:> Sounds easy. :-)

I bought a book a few years ago that put the last few pieces of the puzzle
together for me with regards to setting up Samba as a PDC.  (Roving profiles
were the biggie for me).  I think it was "teach yourself samba in 24 hours"
publised by Sams.

Of course, if O'Reilly publishes a Samba book, it's probably better. :)

Good luck...

-Bill

 
 
 

Linux instead of NT server?

Post by Johannes Bretsch » Tue, 03 Jul 2001 18:47:24



> Daniel Kenzelmann wrote in comp.os.linux.networking:


>> Murphy"

>>> Is it possible to use Linux in place of NT server? The clients are
>>> running Win9X, about 20+ of them and they need file and print sharing
>>> as well as a secure(ish) place for users' files.
> Okay. Thanks, better get a copy of this Linux thing then. And another
> computer. :-)

You dont need the new computer. A Linux system can run more then one
server software. But if you wont this new machine then go and buy :-).

Quote:

>> samba, for win95 boxes, samba 2.0.10 will be ok, for win2000 boxes use
>> samba 2.2.0a

> Have I got this right? Samba will pretent to be an NT PDC server so I don't
> need additional software for the Win9x machines.

Yes.

 There was a ref. to

Quote:> setting up Win95 on the samba download page but I got "Page not available".

Ther is a lot of documentation on the Linux computer on /usr/doc and
/usr/share/doc . Whats perhaps new for a former Windoze user: This
docs are really useful.

Quote:>>> If these questions are ignorant of Linux, naive and trivial, well so
>>> am I! :-)

>> No, they only represent the average knowledge of a windows user
>> about linux.
>>:-)

> Just don't see much of it. Last week saw my second example ever. Someone
> came in and set it up for us as a proxy server.

Then much success with your "first time".

Quote:

>> Be aware.. for samba to work properly, you will have to edit the
>> config file (which can be a lot of work if you have many different
>> access rights for different users... check out the howtos
>> http://www.samba.org

> Didn't find that one but there were a whole bunch of others. No matter, got
> to get a copy of Linux and get it installed. Learn new commands. Enough
> problems there. :-)

The first thing to learn is how to get information. My experience is,
not many Windoze user know this. Try typing "man <problem>" at the
console prompt. If this doesnt help try "info" or
"apropos <problem>".

Quote:> Thanks for the reply.

HTH
 Johannes

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God, Root, what is difference?
   Illiad

 
 
 

Linux instead of NT server?

Post by Rod Smi » Tue, 03 Jul 2001 21:55:39




Quote:

> The first thing to learn is how to get information. My experience is,
> not many Windoze user know this. Try typing "man <problem>" at the
> console prompt. If this doesnt help try "info" or
> "apropos <problem>".

These are all useful tips in general. In the case of Samba, the
smb.conf man page (type "man smb.conf") is unusually complete, but like
most man pages, it's more of a reference tool than a tutorial. For a
new Samba user, better sources of information include the SMB HOWTO
(http://www.linuxdoc.org/HOWTO/SMB-HOWTO.html, among other places), the
electronic version of Eckstein, Collier-Brown, and Kelly's _Using
Samba_ (http://www.oreilly.com/catalog/samba/chapter/book/; it also
comes with most Samba packages), or a hardcopy Samba book (I list
several, including one by me, at
http://www.rodsbooks.com/books/books-samba.html).

For somebody who's also new to Linux, other HOWTO documents, assorted
Web pages, and introductory Linux books are all useful resources. Many
distributions are available in cheap downloadable versions, from
cut-rate CD-ROM duplicators, in the backs of books (usually a version
or two out of date, but sometimes you can luck out and get something
current), or in "official" retail packages that include manuals. The
better of these are actually useful.

--

http://www.rodsbooks.com
Author of books on Linux & multi-OS configuration

 
 
 

Linux instead of NT server?

Post by James Knot » Tue, 03 Jul 2001 22:10:42



> I bought a book a few years ago that put the last few pieces of the puzzle
> together for me with regards to setting up Samba as a PDC.  (Roving profiles
> were the biggie for me).  I think it was "teach yourself samba in 24 hours"
> publised by Sams.

> Of course, if O'Reilly publishes a Samba book, it's probably better. :)

I picked up a good recently.  It's "SAMBA   Unix & NT Internetworking"
by James W. Deroest.

--
Replies sent via e-mail to this address will be promptly ignored.

 
 
 

Linux instead of NT server?

Post by John Murph » Wed, 04 Jul 2001 01:46:10


Bill Pitz wrote in comp.os.linux.networking:

Quote:

>> We no longer run exchange. Too much hard work for me.

> I seem to remember telling myself the same story a few times... :-)

Hard work is bad for me. Good for everybody else.

Quote:>> Sounds easy. :-)

> I bought a book a few years ago that put the last few pieces of the
> puzzle together for me with regards to setting up Samba as a PDC.
> (Roving profiles were the biggie for me).  I think it was "teach
> yourself samba in 24 hours" publised by Sams.

Must get a book. Just need to get something running first. Which we have.
Redhat 6.2 and Samaba. It's showing up on Network Neighbourhood on the
Win9x machines as MyGroup  but not letting us play just yet.

--
John Murphy

 
 
 

Linux instead of NT server?

Post by John Murph » Wed, 04 Jul 2001 02:01:00


Johannes Bretscher wrote in comp.os.linux.networking:

Quote:>> Okay. Thanks, better get a copy of this Linux thing then. And another
>> computer. :-)

> You dont need the new computer. A Linux system can run more then one
> server software. But if you wont this new machine then go and buy :-).

I dare not.

Quote:

>> Have I got this right? Samba will pretent to be an NT PDC server so I
>> don't need additional software for the Win9x machines.

> Yes.

Thanks for the check.

Quote:> Ther is a lot of documentation on the Linux computer on /usr/doc and
> /usr/share/doc . Whats perhaps new for a former Windoze user: This
> docs are really useful.

Maybe later, at the moment they are too much.

Thanks

--
John Murphy

 
 
 

1. Using Linux instead of NT Server in home environment....

I started out running Linux at home on a 386dx/33 which was sold to me
for pocket change.  Ran X Windows, an earlier version of Navigator, etc.
Did fine.  People around me were making payments on a Pentium to do
mostly the same thing with MS.   While they were plunking down $50 here
and there for software, I was spending that money on incremental hardware
upgrades.   In a few months, I *sold* a system equal to the one outta which
they are *today* still trying to squeeze their money's worth.

I skipped the 486 myself, but I installed Linux on one while replacing a hd
for a coworker.  It performed *beyond* my expectations, and experience
said it'd do alright...

If you're accustomed to MS, I'd recommend installing Linux alone on an
older computer before I'd recommend running a dual OS on a Pentium.  In
the later case, I have seen it a few times, you rely on MS for habitual
tasks and let Linux go bit rot, then think it's the fault of Linux.  If you
dedicate an older computer to it, it can be your pet project to learn.  
Soon enough you say, "wow, what this could do on a superior machine!"

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