Printing to a remote TCP/IP printer

Printing to a remote TCP/IP printer

Post by dun.. » Fri, 19 Jun 1998 04:00:00



Hiya Folks-
I've been setting up a Linux machine in my office, and I'd like to set
it to print to our ethernetted printers.  They all have valid IPs and
entries in our print server, which is running NT Server.  I have no
idea how to configure the printcap file, and all of the man pages I
read completely baffle me.  I also cant seem to find a decent how-to
on the subject.

Anyone know how to do this?  Thanks in advance for any assistance.
-Michael

 
 
 

Printing to a remote TCP/IP printer

Post by Brian McCaule » Fri, 19 Jun 1998 04:00:00



> Hiya Folks-
> I've been setting up a Linux machine in my office, and I'd like to set
> it to print to our ethernetted printers.  They all have valid IPs and
> entries in our print server, which is running NT Server.  I have no
> idea how to configure the printcap file, and all of the man pages I
> read completely baffle me.  I also cant seem to find a decent how-to
> on the subject.

The printers could be running one or more of a number of protocols
over ethernet.  (LPD, SMB, reverse-telnet...)

The simplest is probably to use smbclient to print to the NT server so
that your jobs get queued along with everyone elses.  It also avoids
you finding out which prorocol the printers themselves talk.

See SMB-HOWTO for details.

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Printing to a remote TCP/IP printer

Post by Grant Taylo » Fri, 19 Jun 1998 04:00:00



> I've been setting up a Linux machine in my office, and I'd like to set
> it to print to our ethernetted printers.  They all have valid IPs and
> entries in our print server, which is running NT Server.  I have no
> idea how to configure the printcap file, and all of the man pages I
> read completely baffle me.  I also cant seem to find a decent how-to
> on the subject.

The man pages are a bit cryptic, but the Printing HOWTO does have a
large section on this.  The most relevant parts are below.  The whole
thing is at http://www.picante.com/~gtaylor/pht/

Feel free to pester me if you can't get it going from the HOWTO...

  11.  How to print to a printer over the network

  One of the features of lpd is that it supports printing over the
  network to printers physically connected to a different machine.  With
  the careful combination of filter scripts and assorted utilities, you
  can make lpr print transparently to printers on all sorts of networks.

  11.1.  To a Unix/lpd host

  To allow remote machines to print to your printer, you must list the
  machines in /etc/hosts.equiv or /etc/hosts.lpd.  (Note that
  hosts.equiv has a host of other effects; be sure you know what you are
  doing if you list any machine there).  You can allow only certain
  users on the other machines to print to your printer by usign the rs
  attribute; read the lpd man page for information on this.

  11.1.1.  With lpd

  To print to another machine, you make an /etc/printcap entry like
  this:

  # REMOTE djet500
  lp|dj|deskjet:\
          :sd=/var/spool/lpd/dj:\
          :rm=machine.out.there.com:\
          :rp=printername:\
          :lp=/dev/null:\
          :sh:

  Note that there is still a spool directory on the local machine man-
  aged by lpd.  If the remote machine is busy or offline, print jobs
  from the local machine wait in the spool area until they can be sent.

  [...]

  11.5.  To an HP or other ethernet printer

  HPs and some other printers come with an ethernet interface which you
  can print to directly using lpd.  You should follow the instructions
  that came with your printer or its network adaptor, but in general,
  such printers are "running" lpd, and provide one or more queues which
  you can print to.  An HP, for example, might work with a printcap
  like:

       lj-5|remote-hplj:\
               :lp=/dev/null:sh:\
               :sd=/var/spool/lpd/lj-5:\
               :rm=printer.name.com:rp=raw:

  HP Laserjet printers with Jet Direct interfaces generally support two
  built in lpd queues - "raw" which accepts PCL (and possibly
  Postscript) and "text" which accepts straight ascii (and copes
  automatically with the staircase effect).  If you've got a JetDirect
  Plus3 three-port box, the queues are named "raw1", "text2", and so
  forth.

  In a large scale environment, especially a large environment where
  some printers do not support PostScript, it may be useful to establish
  a dedicated print server to which all machines print and on which all
  ghostscript jobs are run.

  This also allows your Linux box to act as a spool server for the
  printer so that your network users can complete their print jobs
  quickly and get on with things without waiting for the printer to
  print any other job that someone else has sent.

  To do this, set up a queue on your linux box that points at the
  ethernet equipped HP LJ (as above). Now set up all the clients on your
  LAN to point at the Linux queue (eg lj-5 in the example above).

  Some HP network printers apparently don't heed the banner page setting
  sent by clients; you can turn off their internally generated banner
  page by telnetting to the printer, hitting return twice, typing
  "banner: 0" followed by "quit".  There are other settings you can
  change this way, as well; type "?" to see a list.

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Printing to a remote TCP/IP printer

Post by Clarence Wilkers » Fri, 19 Jun 1998 04:00:00


Some have a builtin LPD daemon. Typically it's not very rugged.
LPrng has support for network prints. There's a rpm for
Red Hat installations.
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1. HELP: Printing on remote printer via TCP/IP

I'm writing a piece of web-based software that is going to be used in a
doctor's in the area.  I need to be able to print from our remote server
directly to the postscript printer located in the doc's office.  I've been
told that this is possible, but not how to do it. ;)

Here's the setup:  Our server (with Linux/Apache/Perl/PHP) is off site (in
another state) and has a static IP address.  The doc's office is local and
is running a LAN, on which all of the computers and the printers have static
IP addresses relative to the LAN.  That is, they are all of the format
151.0.0.XXX (including the printer, which is 151.0.0.100).  If it matters,
the printer is a HP LaserJet 5 connected to a HP JetDirect port.  I also
know the static IP address coming into the LAN's router- for discussion
let's say it's "215.123.123.123".

I have almost no experience printing with Linux CLI (nor have I been able to
test any of this yet), so I'm just taking a stab at this from reading a
bunch of man pages.  My guess it that the first thing I need to do is set
the router in the doc's office to point a specific unused port (let's say
port 55) at the printer's local IP address.  Then I use lpr to send the
print job to the printer with syntax similar to:

lpr -P215.123.123.123:55 fileToPrint.ps

Am I on the right track?  Is lpr the right command to be using?  Is there
any authentication that I can set up so that only my server can print to the
printer?  Any help or references that you could point me to would be much
appreciated.  Thanks in advance.

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