Physical network structure question

Physical network structure question

Post by KDeGra » Mon, 10 Jul 2000 04:00:00



Hello all.  Sorry for the slightly off-topic post, but I couldn't find any
better group.  (Please feel free to suggest one.)

We are adding on to our high school, and we will have three new computer labs
(two with 15 workstations each and one with 25).  We will also have roughly
sixty machines scattered throughout classrooms, faculty lounges, libraries,
etc.  There are five administrative machines in a portable classroom about 200
feet from the school itself.  Currently, the admin building computers are on an
8-port switch, with coax running into the building to connect them to our
existing network.

We will have four servers.  One will run Win2000 Server to handle client logins
and application serving.  Three more machines, each of which will run either
Linux or FreeBSD, will be handling home directories (SMB), mail (IMAP), and
firewall/routing service for our T1 line.

We are in the process of pulling the Cat5 cable.  In another few weeks, every
network jack in the main building will terminate at patch panels in one room,
and the coax cable from the admin building will also terminate in that room,
which is adjacent to our server room.

Now, for the questions.  How should we structure the physical network?  Should
we use smaller hubs for each lab, and larger ones for the general/classroom
machines?  Should we not use hubs smaller than or greater than any given size?
Should we use hubs, switches, or a mixture?  How should we attach all the main
switches together?  How should we attach the servers?  (Gigabit Ethernet is out
of the question for our budget.)  Should we use 3Com stuff, or Cisco, or some
other brand?  How do we set up subnets?  Which (specifically) models of
equipment should we use?  Can we attach our coax line to any of the
hubs/switches?  Any other information you can give will be much appreciated.

Kevin DeGraaf

 
 
 

Physical network structure question

Post by np.. » Tue, 11 Jul 2000 04:00:00




Quote:> Hello all.  Sorry for the slightly off-topic post, but I couldn't find
any
> better group.  (Please feel free to suggest one.)

> We are adding on to our high school, and we will have three new
computer labs
> (two with 15 workstations each and one with 25).  We will also have
roughly
> sixty machines scattered throughout classrooms, faculty lounges,
libraries,
> etc.  There are five administrative machines in a portable classroom
about 200
> feet from the school itself.  Currently, the admin building computers
are on an
> 8-port switch, with coax running into the building to connect them to
our
> existing network.

> We will have four servers.  One will run Win2000 Server to handle
client logins
> and application serving.  Three more machines, each of which will run
either
> Linux or FreeBSD, will be handling home directories (SMB), mail
(IMAP), and
> firewall/routing service for our T1 line.

> We are in the process of pulling the Cat5 cable.  In another few
weeks, every
> network jack in the main building will terminate at patch panels in
one room,
> and the coax cable from the admin building will also terminate in that
room,
> which is adjacent to our server room.

> Now, for the questions.  How should we structure the physical network?
Should
> we use smaller hubs for each lab, and larger ones for the
general/classroom
> machines?  Should we not use hubs smaller than or greater than any
given size?
> Should we use hubs, switches, or a mixture?  How should we attach all
the main
> switches together?  How should we attach the servers?  (Gigabit
Ethernet is out
> of the question for our budget.)  Should we use 3Com stuff, or Cisco,
or some
> other brand?  How do we set up subnets?  Which (specifically) models
of
> equipment should we use?  Can we attach our coax line to any of the
> hubs/switches?  Any other information you can give will be much
appreciated.

> Kevin DeGraaf

theres some questions i have no answer to.
i'll just answer what i think i know.

you might put your question to comp.os.microsoft.nt.networking (or
systemadministration, whatever)  as well.

first you need to have a look at how much traffic a given machine
generates/will generate.
its different, for instance, if you put cad-machines together than mere
office_and_mail_machines.
so, when projecting subnets, have them about equal in traffic,
or, use better hardware in the power_machine ones.
like, 100Mb nics and hub instead of 10Mb.

so, lets say they produce about equal traffic,
put in about the same number of machines in each subnet.
(this is for client machines only).
this more or less gives you the size of hub you need for that subnet.

i'd put the servers in a different subnet, and put a switch there,
instead of a hub.
so while one server is like mailserving client a,
server b is free to serve client c.

next consideration is your backbone,(is whats connecting all your
hubs/switches)
it should be at least 100Mb .

routing, you either use routers to connect all hubs via the backbone,
or cheap old 486 with linux, 2 nics or more, kernel 'as router not as
host'.
you could make it more failsafe and maybe faster with redundant cabling,
going  from one hub/router not only to one other but maybe two,
and have something like self adjusting routing tables
(this is something i have not tried yet).

hth

--
'...' said the joker to the thief
'there's too much confusion, i cant get no relief...
so let us not talk falsely now, the hour's getting late'
(robert zimmermann)

Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
Before you buy.

 
 
 

Physical network structure question

Post by HF » Tue, 11 Jul 2000 04:00:00


Hi,

Just a quick suggestion

1. use a swich for the backbone
2. use a switching hub for the separte labs
3. Device from 3Com are allright
4. To setup VPN's (for you might want to protect the teachers from the
student or visa versa :-) you need more intelligent devices from
Cisco.

A last tip: think about your traffic and wishes from 1,5 years from
now for you will still have the devices you buy right now.
Maybe it looks overdoen to by equipemnt you don't really need right
now but you may need it in the future. It would be a waste to have to
buy new stuff.

Needs Now+wishes near future = right equipemnt

Good luck




>> Hello all.  Sorry for the slightly off-topic post, but I couldn't find
>any
>> better group.  (Please feel free to suggest one.)

>> We are adding on to our high school, and we will have three new
>computer labs
>> (two with 15 workstations each and one with 25).  We will also have
>roughly
>> sixty machines scattered throughout classrooms, faculty lounges,
>libraries,
>> etc.  There are five administrative machines in a portable classroom
>about 200
>> feet from the school itself.  Currently, the admin building computers
>are on an
>> 8-port switch, with coax running into the building to connect them to
>our
>> existing network.

>> We will have four servers.  One will run Win2000 Server to handle
>client logins
>> and application serving.  Three more machines, each of which will run
>either
>> Linux or FreeBSD, will be handling home directories (SMB), mail
>(IMAP), and
>> firewall/routing service for our T1 line.

>> We are in the process of pulling the Cat5 cable.  In another few
>weeks, every
>> network jack in the main building will terminate at patch panels in
>one room,
>> and the coax cable from the admin building will also terminate in that
>room,
>> which is adjacent to our server room.

>> Now, for the questions.  How should we structure the physical network?
>Should
>> we use smaller hubs for each lab, and larger ones for the
>general/classroom
>> machines?  Should we not use hubs smaller than or greater than any
>given size?
>> Should we use hubs, switches, or a mixture?  How should we attach all
>the main
>> switches together?  How should we attach the servers?  (Gigabit
>Ethernet is out
>> of the question for our budget.)  Should we use 3Com stuff, or Cisco,
>or some
>> other brand?  How do we set up subnets?  Which (specifically) models
>of
>> equipment should we use?  Can we attach our coax line to any of the
>> hubs/switches?  Any other information you can give will be much
>appreciated.

>> Kevin DeGraaf

>theres some questions i have no answer to.
>i'll just answer what i think i know.

>you might put your question to comp.os.microsoft.nt.networking (or
>systemadministration, whatever)  as well.

>first you need to have a look at how much traffic a given machine
>generates/will generate.
>its different, for instance, if you put cad-machines together than mere
>office_and_mail_machines.
>so, when projecting subnets, have them about equal in traffic,
>or, use better hardware in the power_machine ones.
>like, 100Mb nics and hub instead of 10Mb.

>so, lets say they produce about equal traffic,
>put in about the same number of machines in each subnet.
>(this is for client machines only).
>this more or less gives you the size of hub you need for that subnet.

>i'd put the servers in a different subnet, and put a switch there,
>instead of a hub.
>so while one server is like mailserving client a,
>server b is free to serve client c.

>next consideration is your backbone,(is whats connecting all your
>hubs/switches)
>it should be at least 100Mb .

>routing, you either use routers to connect all hubs via the backbone,
>or cheap old 486 with linux, 2 nics or more, kernel 'as router not as
>host'.
>you could make it more failsafe and maybe faster with redundant cabling,
>going  from one hub/router not only to one other but maybe two,
>and have something like self adjusting routing tables
>(this is something i have not tried yet).

>hth

>--
>'...' said the joker to the thief
>'there's too much confusion, i cant get no relief...
>so let us not talk falsely now, the hour's getting late'
>(robert zimmermann)

>Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
>Before you buy.

 
 
 

1. Questions about network Structure Linux using Linux Router/Firewall

I
have questions about the firewall/router setting.

1) Is it possible that the structure inside having real network
   static ip. Description below:

    (ISP: outer network)
      |
      |(eg. IP 210.122.22.135)
    [linux router/ firewall]
      |(eg. IP 210.155.16.125)
      |
    [HUB]
      ++++
      [My Specfic Network Server]  IP 210.155.16.171
      [My WWW Server] IP 210.155.16.172
      [My DNS Server] IP 210.155.16.173

  If I must only use local domain's IP addresses(eg. 192.168.x.x)
   with Ip masq. / NAT, I think that it is not my purpose of
service.

  Or is it possible that another way.,

      (ISP)
      |
      [h/w router]
      |
      [hub]
      |
      [linux routers/firewalls] // each has network server groups.
      |                |
      [hub]         [hub]
      |                |
      [DNSsvr]    [TelnetSvr]
      [WWWSvr]  [MailSvr]

     It can be used for the same way?

2) Is it possible that make one server service with several ISP's
   T1 lines.  (for enlarging network bandwidth)
   Or, one ISP with T1 lines.

   Which is better?

   Where can I see the network structure for the serveral ISP's T1
   or more lines?

--
Hongki Lee.1107071-50071.http://www.chonga.pe.kr/

Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
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