How to speed up NFS?

How to speed up NFS?

Post by Patrick Asc » Thu, 21 Dec 1995 04:00:00



Is it possible to speed up NFS (by changing the kernel-source)?
In a Linux-Ethernet-Network (NE2000) I get 150KB/s with NFS and 500+KB/s with
FTP.

Any ideas?

Thank in advance for reply

   Patrick

 
 
 

How to speed up NFS?

Post by Big-Kahuna » Fri, 22 Dec 1995 04:00:00



>Is it possible to speed up NFS (by changing the kernel-source)?
>In a Linux-Ethernet-Network (NE2000) I get 150KB/s with NFS and 500+KB/s with
>FTP.

>Any ideas?

Strange. You could use the code for NFS via tcp (which ftp uses) rather than
udp (which it uses now). That SHOULD slow NFS down, because it has to do
checking, but if your ftp is flying . . .

--
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How to speed up NFS?

Post by Ian Camer » Thu, 28 Dec 1995 04:00:00



>Is it possible to speed up NFS (by changing the kernel-source)?
>In a Linux-Ethernet-Network (NE2000) I get 150KB/s with NFS and 500+KB/s with
>FTP.

I think the default read and write sizes are 1024 bytes.  One way to
speed up NFS may be to change them to 8192 bytes.

In fstab, as an option use: rsize=8192, wsize=8192

Hope this helps.

Cheers, Ian.

 
 
 

How to speed up NFS?

Post by Rick Hic » Thu, 28 Dec 1995 04:00:00




>>Is it possible to speed up NFS (by changing the kernel-source)?
>>In a Linux-Ethernet-Network (NE2000) I get 150KB/s with NFS and 500+KB/s with
>>FTP.

>I think the default read and write sizes are 1024 bytes.  One way to
>speed up NFS may be to change them to 8192 bytes.
>In fstab, as an option use: rsize=8192, wsize=8192

The defaults should be 8192 already, but if not definately change them.

There are numerous other things to look at, including:
**      the timeouts - are packets being re-transmitted or dropped?
**      more timeouts - for caching TTL
**      caching on the server
**      etc......

For more info check out 'NFS and NIS' from O'Reilly & Associates

Rick

________________________________________
Rick Hicks
Systems Specialist
Hussmann Corporation

 
 
 

How to speed up NFS?

Post by John Timmer » Thu, 28 Dec 1995 04:00:00





> >>Is it possible to speed up NFS (by changing the kernel-source)?
> >>In a Linux-Ethernet-Network (NE2000) I get 150KB/s with NFS and 500+KB/s with
> >>FTP.

> >I think the default read and write sizes are 1024 bytes.  One way to
> >speed up NFS may be to change them to 8192 bytes.

> >In fstab, as an option use: rsize=8192, wsize=8192

> The defaults should be 8192 already, but if not definately change them.

> There are numerous other things to look at, including:
> **      the timeouts - are packets being re-transmitted or dropped?
> **      more timeouts - for caching TTL
> **      caching on the server

Pardon my impudence, but that line above got my curiousity "caching on the
server" -- I didn't really want to go out and buy the book mentioned below
(although I already have a whole library of O'Reilly books -- they're great) so
I am asking here;

Could someone explain that cacheing NFS a bit more, and how does somebody (like
me, fr'instance) set that up (keep it down to 50 words or less, though, please;
no need to spill all the secrets...)  Thanks.

Quote:> **      etc......

> For more info check out 'NFS and NIS' from O'Reilly & Associates

> Rick

> ________________________________________
> Rick Hicks
> Systems Specialist
> Hussmann Corporation

regards, john
--
...my other signature is illegible...


 
 
 

How to speed up NFS?

Post by Klaus Steinberg » Thu, 28 Dec 1995 04:00:00


|> >

|> >

|> > >>Is it possible to speed up NFS (by changing the kernel-source)?
|> > >>In a Linux-Ethernet-Network (NE2000) I get 150KB/s with NFS and 500+KB/s with
|> > >>FTP.
|> > >>
|> >
|> > >I think the default read and write sizes are 1024 bytes.  One way to
|> > >speed up NFS may be to change them to 8192 bytes.
|> >
|> > >In fstab, as an option use: rsize=8192, wsize=8192
|> >
|> > The defaults should be 8192 already, but if not definately change them.
Currently in Linux the default is 1024

My two cents to this:

1. I'm not sure if it's really a good idea to have rsize=8192 on a NE2000.
   I don't know how much back-to-back packets it could receive without loosing.
   But the NE2000 is sure not the best you could find in networking.
   With most boards, which have only 8k, a rsize of 2k or maybe 4k should
   work.

2. If you have rsize=8192, then it's very dependent on the server. But most
   servers give you at least 500-600 kBytes/sec. Even the User Level nfsd
   on Linux could give you  700-800k on a fast hardware with a good ethernet
   board. (I'm using PCI boards with DEC21140 chip)

3. Currently Linux does not very much on NFS caching on the client side.
   Other systems like SGI IRIX 5.x could do that. That enhances performance
   in great way, but has many caveats, so its implementation has to be done
   very carefully.

Sincerly,
Klaus

--
Klaus Steinberger               Beschleunigerlabor der TU und LMU Muenchen
Phone: (+49 89)3209 4287        Hochschulgelaende, D-85748 Garching, Germany

URL: http://www.bl.physik.tu-muenchen.de/~k2/k2.html

 
 
 

How to speed up NFS?

Post by Miguel de Ica » Sun, 31 Dec 1995 04:00:00


Quote:> >Is it possible to speed up NFS (by changing the kernel-source)?
> >In a Linux-Ethernet-Network (NE2000) I get 150KB/s with NFS and 500+KB/s with
> >FTP.

> >Any ideas?

> Strange. You could use the code for NFS via tcp (which ftp uses) rather than
> udp (which it uses now). That SHOULD slow NFS down, because it has to do
> checking, but if your ftp is flying . . .

He may just increase the rsize and wsize to something reasonable like
8192.  In the other hand: NFS over TCP is good for non local networks
while UDP does better for local networks.

Miguel.
--

The Midnight Commander: http://stekt.oulu.fi/~jtklehto/mc/

 
 
 

How to speed up NFS?

Post by Juergen Ho » Wed, 03 Jan 1996 04:00:00



> 2. If you have rsize=8192, then it's very dependent on the server. But most
>    servers give you at least 500-600 kBytes/sec. Even the User Level nfsd

Right, Linux 1.3.49 client (P133 with DEC21141 chip) on HP9k/730 HPUX9.05
gives with the simple iozone program:

        IOZONE writes a 2 Megabyte sequential file consisting of
        512 records which are each 4096 bytes in length.

IOZONE performance measurements:
        127254 bytes/second for writing the file
        797396 bytes/second for reading the file

#####  BUT #####
        IOZONE writes a 2 Megabyte sequential file consisting of
        4096 records which are each 512 bytes in length.

IOZONE performance measurements:
        19535 bytes/second for writing the file
        806596 bytes/second for reading the file

HP filesystem was mounted with rsize=4096, wsize=4096

- So, don't compile with gcc on a nfs mounted filesystem, because the
  assembler  writes many little blocks to the object file!
- Use rcp instead of cp on nfs mounted filesystems for large files

Quote:> 3. Currently Linux does not very much on NFS caching on the client side.
>    Other systems like SGI IRIX 5.x could do that. That enhances performance
>    in great way, but has many caveats, so its implementation has to be done
>    very carefully.

Currently Linux is nearly unusable with nfs exported home directories!

Sincerly, jh

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