Wireless LAN Adapters

Wireless LAN Adapters

Post by Matthew Winthe » Tue, 28 Oct 1997 04:00:00



I need to set up a wireless LAN several miles apart I have seen that the
linux Kernel 2.30 in redhat 4.2 supports several types of radio NIC's.
If anyone has had any experience with any of them, or beefing them up
with amplifiers Yagi ant. etc. please let me know what your experience
was.

Matt Winther

 
 
 

Wireless LAN Adapters

Post by d.. » Thu, 30 Oct 1997 04:00:00


: 5 kms or so , you may even get away with the little plastic patch antennas
: that come with the cards, (provided that you have line of sight].
: To get further you will need a gain antenna.
: I am using small parabolic grid antennas which are popular here is Australia
: for pay TV , which operates in an adjacent band to the Wavelan cards.
: They come is 16 and 24 dbi gain versions.
: The older style Wavelan cards are slowly being obsoleted , but they are
: relatively cheap if you can find a source.
: The newer half length cards are also Linux supported , but cost about double
: the price.

You can actually get about 5kms out of these things.  Hmmm, thats about 2.3 miles.  I would be very interested to know exactly how you did that because I
would love to be able to communicate with my college, which is within that
range.

As a side note do these cards allow multiple people to use them, say
having one machine fixed to a wired ethernet, the rest using radio cards.

As a side note does anybody know a British source for the older cards.

Yours,
Dave Brown.


 
 
 

Wireless LAN Adapters

Post by Maurie Da » Thu, 30 Oct 1997 04:00:00




>Subject: Wireless LAN Adapters
>Date: Mon, 27 Oct 1997 12:40:50 -0700
>I need to set up a wireless LAN several miles apart I have seen that the
>linux Kernel 2.30 in redhat 4.2 supports several types of radio NIC's.
>If anyone has had any experience with any of them, or beefing them up
>with amplifiers Yagi ant. etc. please let me know what your experience
>was.
>Matt Winther


Ive used a number of the older style ATT Wavelan cards with Linux for some
years now.
They work well and if the distance over which you wish to operate is short , <
5 kms or so , you may even get away with the little plastic patch antennas
that come with the cards, (provided that you have line of sight].
To get further you will need a gain antenna.
I am using small parabolic grid antennas which are popular here is Australia
for pay TV , which operates in an adjacent band to the Wavelan cards.
They come is 16 and 24 dbi gain versions.
The older style Wavelan cards are slowly being obsoleted , but they are
relatively cheap if you can find a source.
The newer half length cards are also Linux supported , but cost about double
the price.
I dont have experiance with the newer cards.

cheers
MD

 
 
 

Wireless LAN Adapters

Post by Ker.. » Thu, 30 Oct 1997 04:00:00



> I need to set up a wireless LAN several miles apart I have seen that
> the
> linux Kernel 2.30 in redhat 4.2 supports several types of radio NIC's.

> If anyone has had any experience with any of them, or beefing them up
> with amplifiers Yagi ant. etc. please let me know what your experience

> was.

> Matt Winther


 I just got the latest issue of Network Computing (11/1/97) and they do
a review of 3 new wireless network routers(?).

These routers do 10-Mbps, using spread spectrum, and can communicate
upto 25 miles.

BTW, the winner was Speedlan 10, from Wave Wireless Networking
(www.speedlan.com). cost is $9500 per node.

HTH

Kerry

 
 
 

Wireless LAN Adapters

Post by Achie Li » Fri, 31 Oct 1997 04:00:00




> > I need to set up a wireless LAN several miles apart I have seen that
> > the
> > linux Kernel 2.30 in redhat 4.2 supports several types of radio NIC's.

> > If anyone has had any experience with any of them, or beefing them up
> > with amplifiers Yagi ant. etc. please let me know what your experience

> > was.

> > Matt Winther

>  I just got the latest issue of Network Computing (11/1/97) and they do
> a review of 3 new wireless network routers(?).

> These routers do 10-Mbps, using spread spectrum, and can communicate
> upto 25 miles.

> BTW, the winner was Speedlan 10, from Wave Wireless Networking
> (www.speedlan.com). cost is $9500 per node.

That's a lot of money for home use. There are solutions available
(wireless, sightless point-to-point link) for about $5000. The speed is
2Mbit/s.

- Show quoted text -

Quote:> HTH

> Kerry

 
 
 

Wireless LAN Adapters

Post by Achie Li » Fri, 31 Oct 1997 04:00:00





> >Subject: Wireless LAN Adapters
> >Date: Mon, 27 Oct 1997 12:40:50 -0700

> >I need to set up a wireless LAN several miles apart I have seen that the
> >linux Kernel 2.30 in redhat 4.2 supports several types of radio NIC's.
> >If anyone has had any experience with any of them, or beefing them up
> >with amplifiers Yagi ant. etc. please let me know what your experience
> >was.

> >Matt Winther

> Ive used a number of the older style ATT Wavelan cards with Linux for some
> years now.
> They work well and if the distance over which you wish to operate is short , <
> 5 kms or so , you may even get away with the little plastic patch antennas
> that come with the cards, (provided that you have line of sight].

I contacted a local reseller of Lucent Technologies products (Wavelan
cards) and they told me one cannot bridge more than 500 meters with the
standard antennas.

- Show quoted text -

Quote:> To get further you will need a gain antenna.
> I am using small parabolic grid antennas which are popular here is Australia
> for pay TV , which operates in an adjacent band to the Wavelan cards.
> They come is 16 and 24 dbi gain versions.
> The older style Wavelan cards are slowly being obsoleted , but they are
> relatively cheap if you can find a source.
> The newer half length cards are also Linux supported , but cost about double
> the price.
> I dont have experiance with the newer cards.

> cheers
> MD

 
 
 

Wireless LAN Adapters

Post by Uri Blumentha » Sat, 01 Nov 1997 04:00:00


People, what are you talking about?

It appears that PCMCIA Wireless cards, such as DEC RoamAbout/DS,
are about $500 per card (not $5,000, thank God! :-), standard
antenna included - so cost per node should be $500. Range
would be between 30m (inside the building) to 200m in
the open (if my memory serves me - I'm quoting the
specs form memory).

Bridging over longer distances would certainly employ directional
antennas, plus possibly a bridging unit (I'd suspect - it transmits
more power?)...

Now, my question would be: I used to think that these Wireless
PCMCIA cards can talk not only to each other (assuming of course
they all are DS, and same frequency set and such), but also to
their ISA analogs? In an e-mail from Black Box tech. support
I was told that this is not the case?! How come? Comments?
--
Regards,  
Uri      

<Disclaimer>

 
 
 

Wireless LAN Adapters

Post by Maurie Da » Wed, 05 Nov 1997 04:00:00


.

Quote:>I contacted a local reseller of Lucent Technologies products (Wavelan
>cards) and they told me one cannot bridge more than 500 meters with the
>standard antennas.

.

Probably correct.
A dealer will simply tell you the maximum range over which they will guarantee
that the cards will work.
It doesnt mean that they wont work over longer ranges.
There seems to be a small spread in the sensitivity of the reciever which
permits operation over longer distances simply by swapping cards.
Under these conditions you do need line of sight with nothing but air between
the two antennas.

MD

 
 
 

Wireless LAN Adapters

Post by Brian C. La » Mon, 10 Nov 1997 04:00:00



>..

>>I contacted a local reseller of Lucent Technologies products (Wavelan
>>cards) and they told me one cannot bridge more than 500 meters with the
>>standard antennas.
>..

>Probably correct.
>A dealer will simply tell you the maximum range over which they will guarantee
>that the cards will work.

  The key word is 'standard antenna' -- It may or may not be legal where you
live, but a different antenna, say a beam, with more directionality, would
give you a longer distance. It also depends on the enviornment, whether its
inside or outside, metal stud building, etc.

  Brian

--
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Software & Electronics for Linux               http://www.eskimo.com/~nexus

Inside is a comfortable 71.44 F and Outside is a chilly 46.58 F

 
 
 

Wireless LAN Adapters

Post by malcol » Wed, 19 Nov 1997 04:00:00


Quote:>>I contacted a local reseller of Lucent Technologies products (Wavelan
>>cards) and they told me one cannot bridge more than 500 meters with the
>>standard antennas.

Depending on where you are, and therefore what version of WaveLan cards you
have, the range may be less than this.  The ETSI standard 2.4GHz cards are
specified at 180 meters with standard antennas.  There ARE legal and ETSI
approved outdoor antennas which work up to 9Km available, even further in
non-ETSI environs (e.g. USA) ... at a price.
 
 
 

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