30 GB free space and still "no enought space"

30 GB free space and still "no enought space"

Post by Jussi J??skel?in » Tue, 19 Sep 2000 14:14:07



Hi!
I have little - BIG problem...

I have 2 x 45 GB hard disks and I have made them act as RAID-1 (42 GB)
device with Ext-2 file system!

Problem is, that I can copy only about 11 GB data to that /dev/md0
before system says "No free spce left"...

Here what debugfs says:

Filesystem is read-only
Volume name = (none)
Last mounted directory = (none)
Filesystem UUID = 4908f938-8bac-11d4-824b-0000e84e746c
Last mount time = Sat Sep 16 11:49:38 2000
Last write time = Sat Sep 16 13:25:42 2000
Mount counts = 1 (maximal = 20)
Filesystem OS type = Linux
Superblock size = 1024
Block size = 1024, fragment size = 1024
Inode size = 128
11257856 inodes, 11242558 free
45030080 blocks, 29528393 free, 2251504 reserved, first block = 1
8192 blocks per group
8192 fragments per group
2048 inodes per group
5497 groups (172 descriptors blocks)

I seems to me that there is plenty of free space left (and Inodes and
other stuff)

And BTW, I just made test and format one of those disks to ext2.
Copied files to it and ... Same problem.. 12 GB copied and then "no
free space"..  Then I just try to copy MORE and result was that whole
ext2 filesystem broke down... (Atleast e2fsck found about million
different errors from it)

Do I have problem OR do I have PROBLEM!!!

Please, HELP!!!

 
 
 

30 GB free space and still "no enought space"

Post by Kevin Lawles » Sun, 31 Dec 1899 09:00:00


Hello,

I don't know if this is the problem but Linux may not be able to handle
drives larger than the 12Gb that you are able use. As with some other OS
designs, you may require special software to extend Linux's capability.
There is definitely an upper limit on the amount of memory Linux can 'see',
i.e. approx. 2Gb ( and half of that needs to be swap) and file sizes are
limited to ~ 2Gb. One straight forward solution that I think should work is
to repartition your drive into 3 separate partitions,  with  two partitions
of 12Gb apiece and a slightly smaller partition of 8 Gb.  You could mount
/usr and /home separately as these are more likely to run out of quota
before anything else.  Presumably your systems m/board and  BIOS is fairly
new and capable of recognising very large disk drives. Of course, unless you
need 20 or 30Gb of disk storage for large scale multimedia work etc, you
could use extra partitions  for another Linux installation, maybe another
distribution or a system purely for experimental whims!


Quote:> Hi!
> I have little - BIG problem...

> I have 2 x 45 GB hard disks and I have made them act as RAID-1 (42 GB)
> device with Ext-2 file system!

> Problem is, that I can copy only about 11 GB data to that /dev/md0
> before system says "No free spce left"...

> Here what debugfs says:

> Filesystem is read-only
> Volume name = (none)
> Last mounted directory = (none)
> Filesystem UUID = 4908f938-8bac-11d4-824b-0000e84e746c
> Last mount time = Sat Sep 16 11:49:38 2000
> Last write time = Sat Sep 16 13:25:42 2000
> Mount counts = 1 (maximal = 20)
> Filesystem OS type = Linux
> Superblock size = 1024
> Block size = 1024, fragment size = 1024
> Inode size = 128
> 11257856 inodes, 11242558 free
> 45030080 blocks, 29528393 free, 2251504 reserved, first block = 1
> 8192 blocks per group
> 8192 fragments per group
> 2048 inodes per group
> 5497 groups (172 descriptors blocks)

> I seems to me that there is plenty of free space left (and Inodes and
> other stuff)

> And BTW, I just made test and format one of those disks to ext2.
> Copied files to it and ... Same problem.. 12 GB copied and then "no
> free space"..  Then I just try to copy MORE and result was that whole
> ext2 filesystem broke down... (Atleast e2fsck found about million
> different errors from it)

> Do I have problem OR do I have PROBLEM!!!

> Please, HELP!!!


 
 
 

30 GB free space and still "no enought space"

Post by Grant Taylo » Sun, 31 Dec 1899 09:00:00



> ...Linux may not be able to handle drives larger than the 12Gb...
> ...There is definitely an upper limit on the amount of memory Linux
> can 'see', i.e. approx. 2Gb...
> ...( and half of that needs to be swap) ...
> ...and file sizes are limited to ~ 2Gb...

In fact, none of these things is correct.  More correct statements
would be:

 - Linux cannot boot from drive space not supported by the BIOS.
   Larger disks than the BIOS can handle can still be supported via
   creative partitioning; it's often advisable to make a small first
   partition located at /boot, where all the bootstrap files end up.
   These are the files which the BIOS is used to read at boot time.
   Linux itself (ie, everything after that little LILO message) will
   typically have no trouble with any IDE disk size.

 - Various methods for using memory beyond 2G exist for x86 boxen.
   Native 64 bit platforms (ie Alpha) do not have this restriction at
   all.

 - Swap size is entirely an administrative decision.  Linux will
   operate properly with zero swap in many configurations.  No
   particular multiple of memory size is required.

 - File sizes are limited to 2G by the Unix API, which involves a 32
   bit signed number for file position.  The filesystem itself has no
   problems, and the API extensions necessary to eliminate this
   problem are well specified and available; shortly they will be
   standard (in glibc 2.2, I understand).  As usual, 64 bit systems do
   not suffer from this problem at all.  Some simple big file problems
   can be worked around with the creative use of pipes and the `split'
   command.

--

 Linux Printing Website and HOWTO:  http://www.linuxprinting.org/

 
 
 

30 GB free space and still "no enought space"

Post by j.. » Sun, 31 Dec 1899 09:00:00



>Hello,

>I don't know if this is the problem but Linux may not be able to handle
>drives larger than the 12Gb that you are able use. As with some other OS

        Nope. I've been using 20G & 30G drives for some time now.

[deletia]

        I've had partitions as large as 18G. However, I tend to keep
        them smaller these days. It makes suffling things around a
        bit easier that way. A spare 10G partition can be quite handy.

--

  You have a strong desire for a home and your family interests come first.

  IBM Pollyanna Principle:
        Machines should work.  People should think.

 
 
 

30 GB free space and still "no enought space"

Post by Bill Shirle » Sun, 31 Dec 1899 09:00:00


What command are you using to do the copy?  You could be copying the /proc
and other mounted files systems; like copying the filesystem you are copying
to!!

cd /directorywherethefilesare
cp -ax . /directorywhereyouwantthem
          ^
NOTICE the period!

should work nicely!


> Hello,

> I don't know if this is the problem but Linux may not be able to handle
> drives larger than the 12Gb that you are able use. As with some other OS
> designs, you may require special software to extend Linux's capability.
> There is definitely an upper limit on the amount of memory Linux can
'see',
> i.e. approx. 2Gb ( and half of that needs to be swap) and file sizes are
> limited to ~ 2Gb. One straight forward solution that I think should work
is
> to repartition your drive into 3 separate partitions,  with  two
partitions
> of 12Gb apiece and a slightly smaller partition of 8 Gb.  You could mount
> /usr and /home separately as these are more likely to run out of quota
> before anything else.  Presumably your systems m/board and  BIOS is fairly
> new and capable of recognising very large disk drives. Of course, unless
you
> need 20 or 30Gb of disk storage for large scale multimedia work etc, you
> could use extra partitions  for another Linux installation, maybe another
> distribution or a system purely for experimental whims!



> > Hi!
> > I have little - BIG problem...

> > I have 2 x 45 GB hard disks and I have made them act as RAID-1 (42 GB)
> > device with Ext-2 file system!

> > Problem is, that I can copy only about 11 GB data to that /dev/md0
> > before system says "No free spce left"...

> > Here what debugfs says:

> > Filesystem is read-only
> > Volume name = (none)
> > Last mounted directory = (none)
> > Filesystem UUID = 4908f938-8bac-11d4-824b-0000e84e746c
> > Last mount time = Sat Sep 16 11:49:38 2000
> > Last write time = Sat Sep 16 13:25:42 2000
> > Mount counts = 1 (maximal = 20)
> > Filesystem OS type = Linux
> > Superblock size = 1024
> > Block size = 1024, fragment size = 1024
> > Inode size = 128
> > 11257856 inodes, 11242558 free
> > 45030080 blocks, 29528393 free, 2251504 reserved, first block = 1
> > 8192 blocks per group
> > 8192 fragments per group
> > 2048 inodes per group
> > 5497 groups (172 descriptors blocks)

> > I seems to me that there is plenty of free space left (and Inodes and
> > other stuff)

> > And BTW, I just made test and format one of those disks to ext2.
> > Copied files to it and ... Same problem.. 12 GB copied and then "no
> > free space"..  Then I just try to copy MORE and result was that whole
> > ext2 filesystem broke down... (Atleast e2fsck found about million
> > different errors from it)

> > Do I have problem OR do I have PROBLEM!!!

> > Please, HELP!!!

 
 
 

1. Solaris 2.6, "minfree", 10% free space, tunefs and time vs space

Call me stupid, but even after reading various discussions about the minfree
parameter under Solaris (here and through DejaNews), I'm still confused about
what is the right thing to do.

We have a big mix of Sparc 5s, 10s, 20s, Ultra 1 & 2s, and assorted other
machines.  We have big disks and small disks (400 MB to 9 GB) on different
machines.  Right now, when I do a fresh install of 2.6 on a machine, it's
clearly setting minfree to 10% of the disk capacity, because when I hit 90%
full on a disk I get "no space left on device" errors.

I can already tell that our users will be unhappy when they do df on a disk,
find (say) 400 MB free (on a 4 GB drive), then start to get out-of-space
errors.

So I have three questions:

1) Should we reset the minfree parameter to 1% (or 0%, or other)?
2) Should the time/space optimization parameter be set to time or space?
3) What is the easiest way to set these parameters for jumpstart
   installations?

I checked the Solaris & Sun admin FAQs but didn't find answers to these.

--

 PhD to be, computational models of human visual processing (AI Lab)     of
   UNIX systems administrator & programmer/analyst (EECS DCO)         Michigan

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